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I have a 2000 lb boat on a trailer that I need to park in my back yard. This is about 150 feet on a very slight incline over grass, repeatedly.

Will a
JD 265 handle that kind of work?
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Oh boy, be careful. Boat trailers can do strange things when attached to light duty vehicles, especially if the trailer gets on an incline, fore and aft, or right or left, or one tire gets blocked. In my bad experience way back in the 1970s, just as I was lowering the ball hitch onto the ball, my boat trailer wheels edged over the lip of a garage floor, and took my hand and arm with the ball hitch as it pushed through the tail light of my Dodge K Car. I still have the scars from that one. Yes I was careless, but the potential behavior of a trailer has to be respected.
 

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I have a front hitch on my 1991 Wheel Horse 416H. I moved a 3000lb+ boat/trailer combo around for years with the tractor and never had any problems. But it was on relatively flat asphalt. I always kept the trailer jack wheel close to the ground just in case. I also owned a JD 265 for many years, and feel like it would actually handle the load better than the 416H. I say go for it, but just be careful learning the limitations.

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What are you doing for a hitch? I made a sleeve hitch receiver that will accept standard truck hitch tow bars. This gives a wide range of height options. Trailer angle (hitch height) and tongue weight will matter. You will likely want weights for the front of the tractor. I have a two axle car trailer that I have moved piled with firewood with my 318 and 425. They both needed weight in the front.


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The standard answer is that you shouldn't exceed the tractor + operator weight for towing. My guess is that there is no way the combination weighs more than the boat and trailer. On flat ground that has low rolling resistance, you can exceed that. The reason for the limit is so you have some hope of being able to stop the load.

If your concern is can the JD265 move that large a load without destroying itself? The answer is probably yes. Is it safe? That depends on what you consider safe. I move my 2000 lb chipper with my tractor. It is a lot larger than the JD265 (by a lot) but the combination is probably just under the weight of the chipper. I have to put it into low and 4WD to get up some of the hills I have on my trails. The low really helps control it. I wouldn't consider moving it on my trails with my X534, but it could probably handle the load just fine.
 

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If you decide to go with the 265 I would recommend some more aggressive rear tires weighted with RimGuard to get as much grip as possible. Any moisture and the turf tires will slip pretty easily! HDAP's would be preferable.
 

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Frogmore is 100% right. Your tractor can probably move the rig no problem, but stopping, even on a slight slope may be more "adventurous" that you can imagine!
 

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I have moved my 17 cu-ft garden cart with a heaped load of dirt (about 1800 lb) with my 450 lb LT with no extra ballast. No problem on grass, gravel, or asphalt with the stock turf tires..

If the hydro can get the load moving, it can also stop the load. It takes the same force and traction for either.

A 6000 lb pickup can tow a travel trailer weighing twice as much down the highway at 60+ mph. A GT has a top speed of 9 mph and an LT of 5.5 mph. Transport tractors weigh 21,000 lb and tow loads of over 120,00 lb. In Australia, the road train loads can be over 300,000 lb. So much for not exceeding the tow vehicle's weight with the weight being towed.

Tractors in general are designed for towing. The weak link that limits towing capacity is the transmission.
 

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Trailers over the road usually have their own brakes. Does the boat trailer have hydraulic surge brakes? More importantly, what is the surface like that you want to move across?

This forum likes pictures. We need to see the boat also.


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I'm guilty of pushing a little as well. I brought that down the slight incline next to the house to part on the rocks next to the shed. Went very slow because I was concerned about it getting away from me.
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I use my 318 to park a very heavy trailer in my yard. It is a load to pull, but I am confident that the tractor can handle it. The hill and the grass is the issue - so it depends on how much of an incline you are talking about.

Driving down a grassy hill, if the rear tires start to slip...it can quickly become a free wheeling adventure. The tractor will suddenly be moving at a good speed....while the back tires aren't moving at all or may even be turning backwards. All you can do is steer (steer straight - don't try turning) and wait for tires to catch traction again. I've had this happen once while parking the trailer with my 318. Mowing grass on steep western PA hills with a 430 with liquid filled tires, I've had that happen a few times as well. It's a VERY dis-orientating experience (the tractor doesn't seem to be responding to your forward/reverse control or brakes) and a potentially fatal experience. I've only experienced it going in the forward direction - being pulled backwards would be really freaky.

I'd say it depends on what you mean by a "slight incline" and what is at the bottom of the incline (flat area to recover or things to crash into?). Not trying to scare you, but I wish the best for your health and well being.
 

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My X534 has one of those too, but those are only Class 1, maybe 2 with a 1-1/4 receiver. So supposed to only use the smallest ball, but people do put 2" ones on them.

Many people do things that are not safe. The challenge is stopping. If it doesn't stop when you want, what is the worst that can happen? If you are okay with that scenario, go for it. If you are going to be moving the trailer everyday, I would suggest a bigger tractor.
 

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Something I found super helpful, dry dock at the marina. Cheap.. don't have to tow my boat more than 200 feet and easy on the lawn.
 

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Trailers over the road usually have their own brakes. Does the boat trailer have hydraulic surge brakes? More importantly, what is the surface like that you want to move across?
True! But how far will a 2000 lb trailer coast on a level lawn when the speed is limited to what a GT can generate? The answer; not very far.

Slopes are a different story, but common sense should prevail. Obviously, a 20° slope (36% grade) is going to require a heavier tractor than a 2.3° slope (4% grade) when trailer braking is not available.

From 9 mph (top speed of a GT), my 6000 lb van doesn't coast all that far in neutral, even on asphalt. It will stop a darn sight quicker on a lawn. Most trailer movements using LTs/GTs are done at considerably lower speeds, usually less than 5 mph (7.33'/sec).
 

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I specifically went to x500 over x300 to get diff. lock because one of my tractors duties is moving the boats around! the x500 moves then forward no problem but has an issue pushing them backwards,it may be my pedal adjustments because I have it set for full forward speed! I'll need to readjust the pedals for more reverse pressure and see how it does! these boats are very light but the 21 with tandem axles and twin outboards is making the machine work!
boat trio.jpg
 
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