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Discussion Starter #1
The hood on my STX 38 is kinda messed up. Cracked and broken in a couple of places.

My thought is to clean the inside of the hood the scuff it up a bit with steel wool. Then add a layer of jb weld and then a thin piece of steel as a backing and clamp together.

I do not want to have to buy a new hood at this time and funds are a little tight for a rebuild at this stage.

Has anyone tried this or am I just totally off my rocker on this.

Any and all suggestions appreciated.
 

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I would clean the area good with lacquer thinner, sand it, and fiberglass it. You could glass the outside too, blend & feather it, and repaint after.
 

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The hood on my STX 38 is kinda messed up. Cracked and broken in a couple of places.

My thought is to clean the inside of the hood the scuff it up a bit with steel wool. Then add a layer of jb weld and then a thin piece of steel as a backing and clamp together.

I do not want to have to buy a new hood at this time and funds are a little tight for a rebuild at this stage.

Has anyone tried this or am I just totally off my rocker on this.

Any and all suggestions appreciated.
I made a similar repair on my wife's front bumper cover on her car. The material had a very clear cut in it. I left the damaged area as it was and only cleaned the rear of the damaged area. That way the cut went together as it was before torn. I put a very little bit of epoxy in the cut and heavy on the rear areas. I then reinforced the area with a fiber cloth/screen and allowed the epoxy to be absorbed into the screen and then smoothed out the screen. Hasn't split since and cant even tell it was repaired. I will say her car is a real deep blue, not green. So in green it probably will be more noticeable. Cost me maybe 12$.

Hope that helps.

NIck
 

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One of the hood mounts was broken off the 318 I recently purchased . I'm hoping I can use fiberglass repair with the fiberglass material for a little reinforcement . This is where I'm at right now with it .


4-27-2013 025.jpg



4-27-2013 026.jpg

And this is the piece thats just sitting in place . I'm thinking fiberglass will bond better than JB Weld , but again , I've never tried the JB Weld on something like this . If anybody has a known good fix for these repairs , please let us know .
Frank
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Are you guys referring to the Bondo Home solutions resin and fiberglass mesh from Home Depot?
 

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I would use an epoxy for plastic and reinforce it with layers of mesh and epoxy. Your hood is plastic not fiberglass. Despite your best efforts there is no generate the repair will hold up. Could you show some close up pictures of the broken hood?
 

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I used Devcon plastic weld and I think it worked alot better than JB Weld. I was able to grind it down in about an hour and seems to hold better.
 

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Whatever you do I think youre going to need to rough the area with something more aggressive than steel wool to give your epoxy something to bite into.
 

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Yesterday I cut some clearance relief holes in the sides of my plastic hood on the GT242, as I had replaced the motor with a Briggs v-twin and the larger engine had major clearance issues if I was to use a hood at all. I ended up trimming the inside hood panel just inside the reinforcements to let the unit sit low enough on the new engine, and then found that the edges of the vee were binding with the upper part of the sides where they turn in under the top panel. So I cut two rectangular relief holes from the side panels at those areas and the whole thing now closes as it was intended to, albeit with a very tight fit.

But hey crikey! This material is diabolical. First I found it would shatter in a heartbeat - fractures like crazy. I ended up using a wheel cutter blade on an air tool as about the only thing that would cut this material without violence, and it worked only because it would melt the material away.

I did find that a fine toothed Japanese woodworking saw - cuts on the pull stroke - worked beautifully. Unfortunately I have only one, large such saw and its utility is limited. So maybe the message is this material is hand cut only and with small, very sharp saws and a great deal of time. I have the relief cuts I need, but it looks rough and I'll have to go over it again once I figure out how to do it without destroying things.

I also had the top hood fracture problem; I suspect the material degrades with exposure to sunlight, which could be why the old hoods fracture. I gave up trying a fix and replaced the hood panel, which bolts on with only 4 fasteners and looks great. I picked up the hood panel on ebay for about $180 and it felt like the thing arrived about the same time I shut off the computer. Fast anyway.

The other thing I noticed was a fracture in the hinge area; I drilled out the center of the hinge pivot through the outside of the hood and inserted a bolt/nut on either side to act as the actual hinge. Time will tell whether this helps or makes things worse, but for now it's working and if it acts to stabilize the hinge assembly it should help.
 

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I would use an epoxy for plastic and reinforce it with layers of mesh and epoxy. Your hood is plastic not fiberglass. Despite your best efforts there is no generate the repair will hold up. Could you show some close up pictures of the broken hood?
Hi fletch, JDSTX is right . We used the same thing to repair a STX hood to great results!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
have been researching and researching......

Looking at possibly using loctite plastic epoxy.

Now to clean the area with soapy water on the parts needed and then clean again using acetone a few times.

Scratch the surface with some 120 grit sandpaper as well then acetone again a few times.

Should I get some fiberglass mat and put that on there as well for some rigidity when the epoxy cures?
 

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ABS plastic ( i think that is what these hoods are) deteriates when the UV rays from the sun bakes them when left outside.Stored inside they are happier, same thing happens to modern car clear headlights.Plastic has a natural coating that prevents anything from permanatly bonding to it, you can get non abs products to stick but it will not bond forever.There is on the market a PLASTIC WELDER that will fix the crack.JB Weld not too long back had a plastic product but i dont know if it is still on the market.
 

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I looked at jb weld site and they do have a plastic repair product.using it with a small piece of screen would probably work fine.
 

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Apparently Deere uses soybean oil to make the resin and corn cobs for filler to make this stuff instead of petroleum derivatives. So Deere machines harvest the raw materials that are used to make more Deere machines... Clever!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Pictures of the cracks and pieces broken on the hood.

I have the piece of hood that goes in the hood louver section.
 

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I have repaired two John Deere plastic hoods one from a JD GT245 and the other from JD 325 which are the same. I couldn't find any good info or anybody that had done it so I experimented and what I did worked well.

Here is what I did:

1. I roughed up the area - about 2"- 3" on each side of the crack with 80 grit sand paper on a palm sander and cleaned it with soap and water.

2. I used highest PSI Loctite all purpose epoxy from the hardware store and forced it into the crack. I flexed the hood up/down to get it into the crack. You will get some epoxy on the surface but that's okay.

3. Immediately after epoxying the crack i used tape to pull the joint together and hold hood in place until the epoxy dried. I crisscrossed on the top of the hood, running taped perpendicular to the crack. It looked like stitches when it was taped.

4. I used fiberglass mesh and overlaid the crack and epoxied it to the bottom side of the hood centered on the crack. I basically used the epoxy like resin and used a putty knife to flatten everything out

5. After the mesh set up I took 2" stainless steel body washers and epoxied them along the entire length of the crack. I centered the washer on the crack. I applied another layer of expoxy and mesh over the washers up towards the top where force is applied to open the hood (don't know if that was necessary).

6. After done epoxying everything I pulled the tape and of course there is epoxy that needs to be removed from the top of the hood. I palm sanded the entire the seam to remove the residual eposxy 120 grit sand paper, followed by 220 and then wet sanded with 400, 600, 800 and then used 1000 over thh top of the hood. I then buffed the hood out with rubbing compound and a buffer.

You can hardly seed the crack and the shine is very close to the factory shine. I wish I had 1500 paper - I could have made it that much better. The repair is stronger than the hood ever was from the start. Resin will not stick and the plastic epoxy didn't work for me either. The loctite epoxy is strong - it will peel the face of the plastic before it lets go.

Finished Product:




Underside of Hood:

 

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Discussion Starter #18
Here are pictures finally.
 

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I purchased my '03 x595 last year for a very fair price - in part due to a cracked hood and a cracked fender deck. The hood had a nasty crack directly above the right headlight. I cleaned & roughed the inside, and then carefully fiberglassed the damage. I think I applied three layers of cloth, in an area larger than the damage. It's held up just fine. The crack is still completely visible on the hood, but it adds character. :)

The cracked fender deck may be more challenging. I removed it the other day to figure out a dead fuel sender and noticed that the deck has reinforcing ribs in the area of the crack.


Andreas
 
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