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OK it got way from me. While cutting the Mississippi levee up and down again,I got to the top and wanted to slip it out if gear and put it into reverse instead. Down the levee we went until the sulky jack knifed and me and the "L" flipped on the side. I pulled the choke to stop it. I stood back up inspected for damage, no major bleeding, and then I pulled the "L" back on its wheels and inspected for damage, found none. I have some brused ribs which hurt really bad, but OK. Put the rope to the "L" :praying: and she started up on the second pull. I cut about 60' of the levee so that people in the neighborhood can walk and ride their bikes.

Is there any way to keep the sulky from jack knifing?
What other damage should I look for on the "L", I could not find any. I was not cutting at the time, so the PTO was out of gear.

BUD
 

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The most important thing is that you should never ever ride on a sulky when working on any kind of slope. It will hurt you real quick. Unhook the suly and walk! Concider your self very lucky you only have a few bruses.
 

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Uuuummmm, my reaction is, thank God you're ok first. Second, believe me your Gravely is fine, because if you ended up with just bruised ribs the Gravely didn't feel a thing. And third don't do that at the top of the levy next time and the jack-knifing thing will be a mute point. Glad you're OK.
 

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The advice here is all good. If you have only a slight incline or decline, for a short distance, you can often remain on the sulky. But it won't take much for the sulky and/or tractor tires to start spinning. About the worst thing you can do is disengage the forward or reverse gearing and place it in "neutral." The beast is going to take off at full speed and when you attempt to place it in gear to slow it down, you stand the chance of being bounced right out of the chair from the sudden speed reduction. I use a steering sulky, which is more difficult to unfasten than a non-steering one. So if I start to slip on a couple of the slopes I have, I'll get off the tractor and walk beside it for a short distance. Good to hear that only your ribs are bruised up and not something worse! And rest assured that everyone of us here has done something of a similar nature.........
 

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Glad you're OK. That could have been disastrous.

I agree with the above posters in that sulky + slope = uhhhohhh.

Just be careful. I love my Gravely, but believe me, and I think you found out, they don't care a bit about their operators. They will try to kill you if you let your guard down.
 

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A friend of mine told me many years ago, "Those Gravelys are man-killers!". I told him that wasn't true as they only kill boys.:D Gravely 2 wheel tractors and their implements come with a "learning curve" unlike any other tractor. Less than 4 bloody rags, 10 stitches or damage to "The Boys" is a good day in school!:ROF

Can't "jack knife" in reverse if you're walking it... Gravely was mainly designed to work with operator afoot on slopes (notice narrow wheel tread distance and handlebar end/operator clearance) dual wheels will "help" but will also help you into more desperate situations. That "forward, reverse, neutral" braking thing is a learned art with Gravelys and takes nerves of steel when faced with drop-offs, obstacles, or deep water.:)

Just chalk it up to experience and smile... you didn't damage anything important.:)
 
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