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Back in the day I kept a red oak log behind our store for demonstrating use prior to sell or when a customer couldn't accurately describe the issue with their Stihl chainsaw then out to the log we went. For the normal lay person it's hard to describe the condition but watching them actually use it and seeing the issue answers most questions.

I don't know how many times a customer came in saying his saw was locked up then you reach down and release the chain brake knowing you had demonstrated it to them during the sale. They look at you real funny.
 

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2013 Husqvarna R322T, JD 990, Poulan Pro
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Bertsmobile has me pegged as a sissy man due to that I use a sharp chain (I sharpen on the job), never force the bar into the wood, flip the bar every five sharpenings or so, replace the sprocket, bar, and chain when they are warn to reason. Are those really girly things or can a he-man like me be considerate of his saw? Oh yes I keep the chain running with the sharp part forward too!
 

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I just shot this video today, 1968 Homelite XL12, 100% original. I also have one of Dad's 100CC Homelite Super 1050's that I use for milling. Plus these saws went through 20+ years of commercial service before Dad gave them to me when he retired in 1986. To answer your question, NO it's not normal. This blue XL12 has sat for about two years since I last played with it. I put a shot of 50:1 Stihl fuel mix in the carb, cranked 3-4 times and it fired. Then I filled the tank and primed it again, started and it was drawing from the tank fine. Let it run a few minutes and went and cut this log up, Joe.

 

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Back in the day I kept a red oak log behind our store for demonstrating use prior to sell or when a customer couldn't accurately describe the issue with their Stihl chainsaw then out to the log we went. For the normal lay person it's hard to describe the condition but watching them actually use it and seeing the issue answers most questions.

I don't know how many times a customer came in saying his saw was locked up then you reach down and release the chain brake knowing you had demonstrated it to them during the sale. They look at you real funny.
Back in the day, for us too, there was always a big Oak log out back. Used to tune them in the cut. Sometimes in good weather I'd sneak out to the log to sharpen my saws in one of the grooves at the used up end.
 

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I just shot this video today, 1968 Homelite XL12, 100% original. I also have one of Dad's 100CC Homelite Super 1050's that I use for milling. Plus these saws went through 20+ years of commercial service before Dad gave them to me when he retired in 1986. To answer your question, NO it's not normal. This blue XL12 has sat for about two years since I last played with it. I put a shot of 50:1 Stihl fuel mix in the carb, cranked 3-4 times and it fired. Then I filled the tank and primed it again, started and it was drawing from the tank fine. Let it run a few minutes and went and cut this log up, Joe.
Cool old saw for sure we sold a ton of them back in the day; I trust you didn't fill the tank with 50:1:eek:
 

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I don't know about that, it might be his #6 :eek:
But I hear ya; my little picked before it was grown top handle Echo bought umpteen years ago is like a Timex watch, takes a licking keeps on ticking.
I have two Echo CS280E's. Top handles, I think mine have Timex stamped on them too, they just keep going.
 

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In the '70s , Poulon was a top of the line saw...at that time around here its main competition were McCullough and Homelite ....I have a new Echo that I bought last Summer....it is a smooth nice cutting saw (y)
I should have read the whole post first, now I'm going from reply to reply. I got this 1968 Poulan Super 68, 82CC's with a 31 inch bar last year. It's one of my favorites. Only thing is I'm afraid to run it much, it has 1/2 inch pitch chain and if you have to buy it off Ebay, it can go for $1 or more per link.
 

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I guess I'm glad I missed this original post. I might have tried to assist, and been frustrated like several of you. I guess the short answer to the original question is: No.
 

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Cool old saw for sure we sold a ton of them back in the day; I trust you didn't fill the tank with 50:1:eek:
Yes, I run Stihl Ultra in all of my saws, even the ones that called for 16:1 when they were new. I run 50:1 in my beloved Homelite Super 1050 that I use for milling. Back when it was new it called for 32:1, so did the XL12 series. This pic it has the original 36" bar, it's now wearing a 45". If I could find a 60" for it, I'd have it on there. Sorry for all the pics. It's kind of my way of politely saying there is something wrong here. These saws are 40-50 years old, ran 5-6 days a week for 20+ years. Even the box store saws will run 5-10 years with proper service. I think it's been mentioned already that fuel is the big killer now a days. We can argue oil all day. But, I run nothing but a top shelf oil in my saws. I ran my Stihl 660 the week before the covid lock down hit. It sat in my garage until Thanksgiving with a full tank of fuel. It started and ran fine. Cheap oil with no stabilizers probably won't last that long. I have pulled carbs off that were jelled solid with nasty smelling fuel that all of the ethanol had evaporated out of, and the only thing left were the detergents that are in the fuel. If I get a saw and it has compression, and spark, it will run, unless the carb is clogged. I use a plastic syringe I get at Ace hardware, a 3 pack for two bucks, and shoot a squirt down the carb. Depending on how big the saw is and how big of a shot of fuel, it may start in two or three pulls. If I flooded it bad, it might take 15 pulls. You can tell when it's flooded because raw fuel will come out of the muffler with each pull. Sure wish I could see the OP's saws. Pull the muffler and the piston will tell the tale. Thinking of mufflers, I've seen 2-3 saw that the owners ran so much oil the exhaust port carboned over and it wouldn't run because the exhaust could not get out of the cylinder.

 

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I prime my saws with a squirt of mixed fuel down the carb or in the plug hole. DO NOT use either, or starting fluid on a two stroke. The either will wash all the oil from mixed fuel off the cylinder and make it run very lean. Lean is death to 2 strokes. The only chainsaw I ever bought off Ebay was a Homelite XL700 and the guy had video of the saw running. When I got it, the compression was so low it wouldn't run. I pulled the muffler and the rings were melted into the piston. Turned out the guy was spraying either in the saw to keep it running, he never put fuel in his saws, then he would have to clean them out to ship.
 

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I just shot this video today, 1968 Homelite XL12, 100% original. I also have one of Dad's 100CC Homelite Super 1050's that I use for milling. Plus these saws went through 20+ years of commercial service before Dad gave them to me when he retired in 1986. To answer your question, NO it's not normal. This blue XL12 has sat for about two years since I last played with it. I put a shot of 50:1 Stihl fuel mix in the carb, cranked 3-4 times and it fired. Then I filled the tank and primed it again, started and it was drawing from the tank fine. Let it run a few minutes and went and cut this log up
Cut through it like buttah! (y)
 

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I have gone through Five, A Huskee, Two Sthils and two Josereds. I use them maybe once or twice a month to clean up fallen trees in pastures. I lost two when A Hurricane blew through and a spent three days clearing fallen oak trees.
I've had my Jonsered for 20 years now, and although one of the best saws I've owned, it is also one of the most finicky. It has a high compression engine that will only run on higher octane gas, but it has been a great saw. Something is definitely wrong if your saws are not lasting. Either you have the worst luck with saws I've ever seen, or you're doing something wrong.
 

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Unfortunately any fool can walk into a shop & walk out with a chain saw
Right now those in charge of these things down here are trying to restrict chain saw purchasing to people who have done the 5 hour chain saw safety certificate course similar to firearm purchasing .
Judging from the stuff that comes into my workshop I am inclined to agree with this.
As dflocks says a properly sharpened saw will cut under the weigh of the saw and this is regardless of the wood being cut.
The only difference is some woods dull the blade faster and some woods, like your water oaks may require a different profile chain to cut efficiently.
I can always tell a man's saw from a woman's saw.
The man's saw will have serious undercutting on the bar directly under the bumper spikes where the oafs have been forcing a dull saw to cut, cause "they only have a couple more to do ".
A woman's saw will have a pristine bar.
A man sees it as a mark of this skill to use a drum & spur thill the sprocket is almost cut in 1/2
A woman will come in and tell me "it seems to be vibrating" as the spur gears wear & the chain runs tight - loose - tight - loose
A man will not replace the chain till the cutting edge extends to the back of the teeth

I could go on but the mods will get cranky with me.

If any of you know any A & E staff, ask them what they think about chain saw safety .
Down here they come second only to motor vehicle accidents for hospital admissions .

As to interogations.
No one can help Chiefland33 if we don't actually know what his problem actually is and he seems steadfast in not divulging any useful information , deliberately using ambigious terms that have no specific meaning like "go through & won't work" to the point where one might wonder if he really has a problem or is just fishing for comments or trying to start a brand war.
Usually if a customer is having problems they want to tell me everything up to what they had for breakfast because they want their problem solved.
Right on Bert !!
Because the problem remains unclear, the responses have wandered all over the place.
Would be so helpful to all readers (and the archives) if comments could have been directed to whatever the problem is and now, after three pages, may have been helpful to the OP.
 

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Well, so far, the closest we've got to what happens to the O.P.'s chainsaws is "Usually ill be sawing and the thing stops". To me, it seems likely to be an end-user-issue, such as bad mix or poor maintenance or perhaps even somehow sawing incorrectly, but without more detailed info on how the saws fail, I think all we can really say that it's very unusual for saws to fail that soon after purchase if they are properly maintained and operated.
 
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