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If you really want help with getting them working again, or at least understanding why they stopped, you'll need to provide more info about how they were operating when they were running, and then how they stopped running/starting. Those saws you described are good brands, and even cheap versions of they last more than a few hours of use. The ones you say stopped working after a few days of clearing trees after a hurricane, to me that sounds like something like water in the fuel or intake, or the air cleaner plugged, or the fuel was the wrong mix for the saw (either too little or too much oil or the wrong oil in the gas).

Looking at the spark plug, seeing how it feels/sounds when pulling the starter, just to start with, can give you a clue. Now, presumably the saws have been sitting for years, it's probably a bigger job of cleaning the carb and gas tank, replacing fuel lines and fuel filter, cleaning/replacing air filter and spark plug, and going from there (assuming it feels like the saws spin over ok and have decent compression).
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I mean like huge fallen down oak tres. Usually ill be sawing and the thing stops. I got em checked out by a tractor mechanic. He said that he has had it happen to him. No matter what I do I cant fix em.(Im not cutting down trees or making wood for a fire. These trees are huge
 

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Maybe the saws are too small for the job and are overheating. What size is a 'huge' tree and what model of saw and bar length are you using? Is the chain properly sharpened?
 

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I have a Stihl 026 Pro that I 've had since 1997, I used to have a wood-burning stove for the house and would cut maybe 10 - 15 cord a year with it and only thing I've done was had bar dressed, new chains and a tune up about once every 4 -5 years. Can still go out today and it'll run strong with just a few pulls. I agree, you must not have your mix correct, it is better to run slightly rich than lean on the mix.
I've got an older 260 Pro as well. Love that old girl! This is it sitting next to my 462 when I bought it last year. I've also got a 261 that I love as well. I fully expect all three of those saws to last me for the rest of my life, and then go on to somebody in my family if they want them. I've never owned a Husky, so I know nothing about them. But there are plenty of pros that use them every day, all day, for years on end. And the OP didn't mention which MODEL of those saws he had. Were they the cheap "farm boss" or homeowner grade with the plastic cases vs. the magnesium cases? The OP gave almost zero information, so that makes it difficult to steer him in the right direction.

I'm REALLY wanting to get the new 500i that's just now starting to become available in the States. I'd love to try a fuel injected saw. Don't really know that I "need it" though.
 

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USA oak is fairy foss comparred to Aussie Iron Bark , Kurri , Jarra etc.
1/2 of the worlds railways were running on Aussie railway sleepers at one time
And these saws will cut them like butter
Natives in New Guinea who had never seen a chain saw spent days & nights cutting down native teak and the only wood harder to cut than that is 1/2 burned gum trees, and hundreds of forestry workers are doing this right now cleaning up after last years bush fires .
The size of the tree is fairly well irrelevant .
All you need is a sharp blade and you can cut a 200' oak with a 10" 25cc saw.
But again stopped working ?
Chain stops spinning ?
Chain spins but dose not cut ?
Chain burns in the groove ?

The only time I have seen a saw that definately would not cut had the blade on backwards because I told him to flip the bar every time he filled the tank so he put the chain on the bar then flipped the bar so the chain was running backwards

So there is some thing wrong with your method or saw preperation.
Most saws will run on any fuel mix from 25 :1 through to 50 : 1 and any bar oil from baby oil through to veggie oil and even old sump oil ( some people are just too cheap for words )
 

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Easy Guys... there's probably a solution to be had here but intense interrogation may not be the kindest way. 🙂🍻

But yes... what everyone is asking is what was the mode of failure?

Without knowing that we've got nothing to go by.
 

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I feel like this is one of those times where a helpful friend watching what is happening would be best. It took me a long time to figure out not to force the saw down. It oils and cuts better to let the weight of the saw take it thru the wood.

I was overheating the bar and chain pushing down too hard and it was not oiling well.
 

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There are not too many things to cause the same thing to several saws in such a short time
1) Fuel problem....not enough oil in the gas mix..using 87 instead of 89?
2) Dirty or no air filter
3) Ran out of chain oil ( I much preferred the old ones with the manual oilers)...this will also dull the chain, causing the engine to work harder...
Just because they are big pieces does not mean that they are going to end the useful life of a virtually new saw....unless you are constantly "pinching" the bar causing the chain to stop and stressing every moving part....As @Steve Urquell said...an experienced friend to observe and give some constructive criticism would probably go pretty far..and let the saw do the work
 

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What happens to them?..The only thing I can imagine is that you are not using the correct fuel mixture...I don't particularly care for Stihl, myself, but they are recognized as a good piece of equipment...Josered is the premiere saw.....not sure about Huskee
husqvarna owns gardena, mcculloch, poulan pro, weed eater, jonsered ,redmax and others with most sharing many parts save the plastic covers
if one is killing good name saws i would look at a lock of proper oil mixes first,
i have both husky and stihl with them run well over 200 hours each without any problem
 

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Very likely, what Chiefland33 is referring to is the water oak. It's very prevalent here in Florida and also related to the live oak, both of which are different than the oaks of the North. These trees are massive with trunks at the base often over 6 feet thick. Both the water and live oak have a very high water content in the living trees and tend to rot while still appearing healthy. People learn the hard way (like me!) that one does not park their vehicle under a live or water oak. I've tried splitting water oak that is freshly cut with an ax and it just bounces off, both end or lengthwise. The high water content is very rough on saws, both the chain and the engine have to work much harder to cut even smaller pieces.
 

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They make chainsaws that can cut concrete! The saw engine doesn’t fail. The chain wears but in the end the concrete is sliced in two. You tell me I’ll ruin my saw on wet tree wood? I doubt it.
 

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Yeah, these water & live oaks are different than what you may be used to when compared to the oaks of the North. I shattered the gears of a B & D pole saw trying to trim a limb off the trunk. That saw had no problem with the camphor & mimosa trees.
 

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They make chainsaws that can cut concrete! The saw engine doesn’t fail. The chain wears but in the end the concrete is sliced in two. You tell me I’ll ruin my saw on wet tree wood? I doubt it.
Not sure what you're talking about. Saws fail all the time.
 

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Not sure what you're talking about. Saws fail all the time.
I guess it depends on the definition of "fail." If you mean "fails to cut wood," then yes, that happens all the time. In my experience, this is almost always because the chain goes dull. If you mean "fail" in the catastrophic, saw-needs-repair sense, then I disagree.

When I first got into chainsawing, this was the biggest surprise to me. It made plenty of sense that it needed fuel, bar oil, and a clean air filter. I didn't realize how important proper chain maintenance was, and what a world of difference a sharp chain makes. I now spend time before each saw day tending to my chains with a file. I enjoy doing it, and it makes life a heck of a lot easier when your job is to "hold the saw back" instead of pushing it into the tree.

I know plenty of casual homeowner types who never think about the chain. I wonder how often they come to the conclusion that because the saw won't cut, or dies when bogged down in a tree, that it is in need of extensive repair.
 

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Five in two years? There is something wrong with the way it is being used. Cut off saws use an engine similar to a chainsaw but have an abrasive or cutting disc, not a chain. Completely different application.
 

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Unfortunately any fool can walk into a shop & walk out with a chain saw
Right now those in charge of these things down here are trying to restrict chain saw purchasing to people who have done the 5 hour chain saw safety certificate course similar to firearm purchasing .
Judging from the stuff that comes into my workshop I am inclined to agree with this.
As dflocks says a properly sharpened saw will cut under the weigh of the saw and this is regardless of the wood being cut.
The only difference is some woods dull the blade faster and some woods, like your water oaks may require a different profile chain to cut efficiently.
I can always tell a man's saw from a woman's saw.
The man's saw will have serious undercutting on the bar directly under the bumper spikes where the oafs have been forcing a dull saw to cut, cause "they only have a couple more to do ".
A woman's saw will have a pristine bar.
A man sees it as a mark of this skill to use a drum & spur thill the sprocket is almost cut in 1/2
A woman will come in and tell me "it seems to be vibrating" as the spur gears wear & the chain runs tight - loose - tight - loose
A man will not replace the chain till the cutting edge extends to the back of the teeth

I could go on but the mods will get cranky with me.

If any of you know any A & E staff, ask them what they think about chain saw safety .
Down here they come second only to motor vehicle accidents for hospital admissions .

As to interogations.
No one can help Chiefland33 if we don't actually know what his problem actually is and he seems steadfast in not divulging any useful information , deliberately using ambigious terms that have no specific meaning like "go through & won't work" to the point where one might wonder if he really has a problem or is just fishing for comments or trying to start a brand war.
Usually if a customer is having problems they want to tell me everything up to what they had for breakfast because they want their problem solved.
 
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