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I would think about it if in the states, but it’s hard to beat the tool truck coming right to the shop weekly with no questions asked warranty
 

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I don't think so ......I do not consider myself to be a professional, but I own a business and I have pros work for me, and they consider anything from HF to be a joke....personally I consider their stuff to be disposable...it is cheaply made and not professional grade....it is going to be a difficult image for them to overcome
 

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I love my 54" HF tool box. I have no need for something that big.

If I worked in a garage again I would like the "warranty" guys to be there weekly as I have been there and done that. BUT I have bought stuff that they fixed 3 times and stopped the warranty on something I could have gotten 3 times cheaper and replaced if needed for 1/2 what I paid.

BUT the prices outweigh the benefits. I would love to buy American but it's hard to find, and even snap-on stuff is made in China. So where do you drawl the line?
 

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All the Sears stores and anything that sells craftsman are no longer available close to me, NAPA closed down, and only thing really left selling tools is WalMart, Advanced Auto, and O'Rileys, and Ace Hardware; but we now have a small Harbor Freight close by. I don't normally buy their hand tools but those look pretty good! I will have to check them out.
 

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I have a couple of the 22x26 US General cabinets. They're heavier steel than my old Craftsman cabinets from the 1980's and the drawer slides are much smoother. I like the shallower drawers for hand tools and the price is right.
Hopefully the introduction of the ICON brand doesn't mean they are discontinuing the US General cabinets as they are actually a good value for the money.

The Icon cabinets are well built and similar to the Tool Truck units but I'm not interested in either one. They cost enough that the depreciation is significant. Just like cars and trucks... they're not worth the price to buy new. I'd buy used tool truck cabinets if I was interested in units like that.

I don't buy HF hand tools. The Borg have Husky and Kobalt with lifetime warranties. I haven't tested whether those warranties are worth the paper they're printed on... If the articles about Lowes and Craftsman tools are anything to go on the answer is NO.

:1106::1106:
It seems that the Craftsman Lifetime Warranty is not honored by anyone other than Sears. The sale, by Sears, of the Craftsman tool line to Stanley means I will not be buying any more Craftsman tools.
According to news articles Lowes will not warranty older Craftsman screwdrivers, sockets, and wrenches now that Stanley owns the brand and rumor has it that ACE will not warranty the Craftsman hand tools they sell.
According to the same article Lowes will warranty tools if they stock the exact part number in question. This means they can avoid warranty coverage if they change the part numbers on a regular basis. I'd be willing to bet that they do exactly that.
https://www.wcpo.com/money/consumer/dont-waste-your-money/will-lowes-honor-craftsman-lifetime-warranties
 

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I have pros work for me, and they consider anything from HF to be a joke....personally I consider their stuff to be disposable...it is cheaply made and not professional grade....it is going to be a difficult image for them to overcome
You are always going to have the guys using what they buy as a "measuring tool" and sadly tools are just another way of doing that.

I was a class A trailer wreck rebuilder and used some of their stuff successfully. The air recip saw was awesome.

Loved the super speed 10,000 rpm air drill for zipping holes in thin alum panels and the 4" air angle grinder was awesome. I also used the heck out of the big air pop riveter pulling 1/4" alum mono-bolts and TLRs.

The electric grinders won't hold up in a commercial setting but neither would Dewalts. I'd put their air tools on par with the cheaper air tools many tool truck drivers would carry-Rodac is what my Cornwell guy had.
 

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Gotta love snap- on but...
I worked with Bob. Stupid 23 y/o redneck with a giant empty Snap-on box. Traded up for a bigger empty box. He was always borrowing my Craftsman tools cuz he couldn't afford any Snap-on stuff and his box was empty.
 

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A good warranty IS important. I don't think any of would debate that.
What I've noticed to be the true measure of quality is when the tool removes the fastener without breaking. Cheap tools deflect and round off corners, or the fastener damages the cheap tool (like screws taking chunks out of the screwdriver's tip).

Ultimately, When a job needs doing, the tool must perform. Sometimes I don't have time or patience enough to get a tool replaced, so I'd rather it be able to complete the job. If a low cost or cheap harbor freight tool satisfies my requirement, so be it!
 

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I worked with Bob. Stupid 23 y/o redneck with a giant empty Snap-on box. Traded up for a bigger empty box. He was always borrowing my Craftsman tools cuz he couldn't afford any Snap-on stuff and his box was empty.
I was "smart Bob." When I was wrenching on travel trailers and fifth wheels, I bought a very large (i dunno... 40" wide x 5'10" tall x 24" or so deep 316 stainless box from Sam's club over 15 years ago.. It looks amazing. I always kept it cleaned, but not covered and sterile. I removed the Steel Glide badging from it and installed appropriate sized Snap-On badging. LOTS of compliments from customers!
 

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I worked with Bob. Stupid 23 y/o redneck with a giant empty Snap-on box. Traded up for a bigger empty box. He was always borrowing my Craftsman tools cuz he couldn't afford any Snap-on stuff and his box was empty.
I was "smart Bob." When I was wrenching on travel trailers and fifth wheels, I bought a very large (i dunno... 40" wide x 5'10" tall x 24" or so deep 316 stainless box from Sam's club over 15 years ago.. It looks amazing. I always kept it cleaned, but not covered and sterile. I removed the Steel Glide badging from it and installed appropriate sized Snap-On badging. LOTS of compliments from customers!
Ha, That's awesome. One of the guys in the shop bought one of those. It was a nice box. Some of the tool truck elite gave him crap about it calling it his "refrigerator"

My set was the big black Craftsman box with roller slides. I just kept adding to it as my tool set expanded. Ended up being 6.5ft long in a cart when I worked truck fleet.

I broke it down to its base size after working on trailers as I didn't need all the truck tools. Same size as your "Snap-off" box.
 

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Tools are the life blood of any mechanic I have bought some tools from harbor freight but nothing that my life depended on, I have some tools that were my great grandfathers and i cherish them and use one or two sometimes just because, It is simply amazing what our fathers and grandfathers got by with with just a monkey wrench and pliars.
 

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Tools are the life blood of any mechanic I have bought some tools from harbor freight but nothing that my life depended on, I have some tools that were my great grandfathers and i cherish them and use one or two sometimes just because, It is simply amazing what our fathers and grandfathers got by with with just a monkey wrench and pliars.
My most used tool is an old Plumb 1/4" ratchet. It just feels right in the hand.

Made when quality, reputation, and craftsmanship were more important than profit and ease of manufacturing.
 

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It is simply amazing what our fathers and grandfathers got by with with just a monkey wrench and pliars.
Simpler designs of stuff to work on back then. Spark plugs weren't sunk 6" deep. Fuel lines didn't need special tools to disconnect. Special tools just weren't needed to do one single job that can't be done using any other kind of tool. I can disassemble a surprising amount of my 1940 9n Ford with a crescent wrench, a pair of pliers and a little patience. My 2003 or so Kubota, not so much. That thing uses fasteners not even thought of in 1940 such as torx head screws, therefore the tools didn't even exist back then. Even common fasteners used today weren't but in their infancy back then (phillips head screws).

Back to the topic though, some of those specialty tools not really used daily by the average Joe sich as a flare nut wrench and brake spring pliers, welders, etc. just make sense to buy at harbor freight. Now - if you find yourself using the tool you never thought you would over and over to the point it wears out (or in the case of a cheap welder when your improved skills or further interest in the fabrication hobby progress beyond the capability of it), then it makes sense to buy higher quality stuff to replace them.

I used pretty decent OK Craftsman screwdrivers for years and years. I decided I wanted to splurge just a little, and bought an 8 piece Matco set for like $120. If I have a rusty screw or something that looks like it might be a little difficult to remove, I'll go out of my way to seek out one of those better quality Matco screwdrivers. They have a much better shot of removing the screw due to being made from harder and more precision machined steel, nearest I can figure. Or they'll break the head off the screw rather than strip it.
 

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I don't think so ......I do not consider myself to be a professional, but I own a business and I have pros work for me, and they consider anything from HF to be a joke....personally I consider their stuff to be disposable...it is cheaply made and not professional grade....it is going to be a difficult image for them to overcome
Bought a plastic welder from them
All I can say it will weld anything including JD plastic
 
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I know someone that has a company with a lot employees that loses small tools a lot. They used to buy their tools at Graingers which has good quality tools. Then he start buying tools at Home Depot that where much cheaper and almost the same quality. Graingers is two or three times higher than Home Depot which is twice as high as Harbor Freight. Now he buying some tools at Harbor Freight and feels he's really saving money. His crews uses small hand tools like 22 oz hammers, 2 lb hammers, lineman pliers, levels, trowels and wrecking bars, tape measures. He said with 300 employees constantly losing everything he decided to buy the cheap stuff at Harbor Freight.

For instance lineman pliers at Graingers is about $65, at Home Depot there about $30 to $40. At Harbor Freight they are $5.

He said they need the pliers for only tying up small wire and cutting it. He said they can use the 5 dollars ones. Same thing with the hammers. He said they don't lose the chain saws, circular saws, or DM50 saw, only the small hand tools.
 

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Simpler designs of stuff to work on back then. Spark plugs weren't sunk 6" deep. Fuel lines didn't need special tools to disconnect. Special tools just weren't needed to do one single job that can't be done using any other kind of tool. I can disassemble a surprising amount of my 1940 9n Ford with a crescent wrench, a pair of pliers and a little patience. My 2003 or so Kubota, not so much. That thing uses fasteners not even thought of in 1940 such as torx head screws, therefore the tools didn't even exist back then. Even common fasteners used today weren't but in their infancy back then (phillips head screws).

Back to the topic though, some of those specialty tools not really used daily by the average Joe sich as a flare nut wrench and brake spring pliers, welders, etc. just make sense to buy at harbor freight. Now - if you find yourself using the tool you never thought you would over and over to the point it wears out (or in the case of a cheap welder when your improved skills or further interest in the fabrication hobby progress beyond the capability of it), then it makes sense to buy higher quality stuff to replace them.

I used pretty decent OK Craftsman screwdrivers for years and years. I decided I wanted to splurge just a little, and bought an 8 piece Matco set for like $120. If I have a rusty screw or something that looks like it might be a little difficult to remove, I'll go out of my way to seek out one of those better quality Matco screwdrivers. They have a much better shot of removing the screw due to being made from harder and more precision machined steel, nearest I can figure. Or they'll break the head off the screw rather than strip it.
you sound like the type of guy that i would enjoy wrenching with!
 

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I should have bought some good tool truck screwdrivers back when I was working in the shops. I went from the clear handled Craftsmans to an "Industrial" Craftsman set that looked like a good set (black handles and shanks, bead blasted tips) but were terrible.

I ended up getting by with them because I used a Craftsman ratcheting screwdriver with bits for most everything. The Snap-ons with the hex shank were really nice but I could never bring myself to pay the price for them.
 
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