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For those who think the battery powered outdoor tools are "boring" & those who knock things they really know little about, don't read this thread!

Battery tools are the coming thing, though not for everybody!

For me, I use both gasoline powered & battery, the battery tools are the appropriate tool or some jobs. I still have a bigger "straight stick" trimmer & a couple gasoline chainsaws & use them for much of my work, but the battery powered are better for other jobs.

They both have their place! :1106:
 

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Eco- Friendly landscaper.
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Discussion Starter #42 (Edited)
Moved to where? There is no Lithium Ion OPE forum...and I have talked a fair deal about my walk behind mowers, as I only use walk behind mowers for my business. Yes the discussion kinda branched off into other Li-ion tools, but that's mainly because people don't know a lot about the tech period.


Again, thanks for all the kind words of encouragement!
 

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Eco- Friendly landscaper.
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Discussion Starter #44
I just looked again, I guess this would make more sense in the Tool Shed forum. Can someone move it?
 

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I think its cool technology, and I am glad that it works for you! I just hope they dont replace small engines down the road. An option to buy one is one thing, but I dont want it to be the only option. I enjoy small engines to much.
 

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I find it interesting.Look how far we have come with power tools like drills,impact wrenches,sawzalls,etc.I can not think of the last time I have used a corded drill?I use to use air tools like impact guns to remove large rusted bolts and had to take farm machinery to the shop to the air supply.Now days I just get out my Milwaukee M-18 Fuel 1/2'' drive and take it to the farm machinery.

I was at Sears a few days ago and seen my first modern day battery pack push mower.Not saying it was the one to buy?But first one I have been up close to.I like how light weight it was.Could not help but think it would make a great trim mower.

I have a niece a single mom.She had shoulder surgery a few years back.Her lawn has to many obstacles for a riding mower.Like a enclosed fenced in back yard and young trees to mow around.A rider just will not work on this small lawn.She has a self propelled walk behind.She can not start it because of her bad shoulder.Also being a self propelled its heavy and hard to manuver.She went to a cheap light push mower.Its OK but she has to get someone to start it.I searched for a electric start mower.But then there always heavy.

I think the Sears I seen or something similar would be perfect for her.
 

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Eco- Friendly landscaper.
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Discussion Starter #48
I find it interesting.Look how far we have come with power tools like drills,impact wrenches,sawzalls,etc.I can not think of the last time I have used a corded drill?I use to use air tools like impact guns to remove large rusted bolts and had to take farm machinery to the shop to the air supply.Now days I just get out my Milwaukee M-18 Fuel 1/2'' drive and take it to the farm machinery.

I was at Sears a few days ago and seen my first modern day battery pack push mower.Not saying it was the one to buy?But first one I have been up close to.I like how light weight it was.Could not help but think it would make a great trim mower.

I have a niece a single mom.She had shoulder surgery a few years back.Her lawn has to many obstacles for a riding mower.Like a enclosed fenced in back yard and young trees to mow around.A rider just will not work on this small lawn.She has a self propelled walk behind.She can not start it because of her bad shoulder.Also being a self propelled its heavy and hard to manuver.She went to a cheap light push mower.Its OK but she has to get someone to start it.I searched for a electric start mower.But then there always heavy.

I think the Sears I seen or something similar would be perfect for her.
I highly suggest the Echo 58 volt mower. It is the best thing out there right now. Plus it has a 2 year commercial/ 5 year homeowner warranty.....and 90 day return policy.....plus a lifetime warranty on the deck!
 

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I have the 56V EGO trimmer, hedge trimmer, blower, and now the chain saw. I love them all. I had an electric chain saw before, nice to always know that it will start easily, and you can just shut it off whenever.. very convenient. Also nice to know that if I lent my father in law use it for some shrubs, I wont have to spend a long time explaining what to do if flooded/wont start/stalls etc...

I had figured that the next step, logically, was the mower. I mow for about 1hr20mins with a self propelled mower each time, so I thought that would be a bit much for a single battery. I had hoped that I would have some big convenience in batteries by already owning a few of the 56V EGO, but I may have to look at the 58V ECHO... ?
 

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Having worked for a spell at the local Home Depot, I can say with certainty that we have not come all that far with battery "technology" yet. The tool rental where I worked was charged with taking in, listening to all the upset customers, accepting returns and worse of all, warranty coverage of these tools. Believe me it was a pain. HD makes customers jump through hoops to return a battery device. Perhaps they have changed their policies since I left but I doubt it. There were just to many returns for any company to absorb. And I can't think of one battery powered tool that they rented with the exception of a Paslode nailer. Which was really gas driven.

Just go on Craigslist and see all the battery powered equipment listed. Most if not all with unmentioned dead batteries. Buyer beware with that! I do use light hand tools like drills and trimmers but I think a mower to do the entire lawn would be a stretch too far for me. Yes they now have the power required to do a good job. But I have already melted a Ion lithium battery on my bench. It could have burned the house down. And I fully expect the newest gadget to join all the rest of the obsolete battery powered tools laying under my bench.

Maybe that's why condo's are so popular these days.
 

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I'll guess that after about 6 weeks of using these batteries commercially, you'll be peddling your bike back to the store at $100 bucks per shot. Not much of a warrantee on battery tools used commercially. Not much any other way either. Make sure you have all of your registrations done or you will have none. And make sure you have a charging station near your work when the batteries go dead and you still have two customers to get done.

Leaving your bike out of the conversation, I would bet your "carbon footprint" is bigger than you might think. Batteries don't charge themselves for free and the power still comes from that dirty old fossil fuel with an 80% efficiency loss built in. No free lunch in this world. Batteries are a safety hazard for good reasons. They like to light on fire. Try taking one on an aircraft or better yet, ask Samsung. They do not recycle well if at all. More than a few at a time and they are considered hazardous waste and treated that way. Can't you just imagine the day when all power comes from those green batteries? And allof the power and pollution it will take to morph them back into something useful?

I would really like to see you peddle your cart ten miles or so to where a normal customer might be. Especially in the 90 degree heat of our summers. Good luck with that. But I'll stick with the gas truck thank you.

With all that in mind, I can't wait to see a battery powered self driving car going down an ice covered highway in below zero weather. :) This will be interesting to say the least. Most of this country isn't so green most of the year.

But if that's what trips your trigger, go for it.
 

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I'll guess that after about 6 weeks of using these batteries commercially, you'll be peddling your bike back to the store at $100 bucks per shot. Not much of a warrantee on battery tools used commercially. Not much any other way either. Make sure you have all of your registrations done or you will have none. And make sure you have a charging station near your work when the batteries go dead and you still have two customers to get done.

Leaving your bike out of the conversation, I would bet your "carbon footprint" is bigger than you might think. Batteries don't charge themselves for free and the power still comes from that dirty old fossil fuel with an 80% efficiency loss built in. No free lunch in this world. Batteries are a safety hazard for good reasons. They like to light on fire. Try taking one on an aircraft or better yet, ask Samsung. They do not recycle well if at all. More than a few at a time and they are considered hazardous waste and treated that way. Can't you just imagine the day when all power comes from those green batteries? And allof the power and pollution it will take to morph them back into something useful?

I would really like to see you peddle your cart ten miles or so to where a normal customer might be. Especially in the 90 degree heat of our summers. Good luck with that. But I'll stick with the gas truck thank you.

With all that in mind, I can't wait to see a battery powered self driving car going down an ice covered highway in below zero weather. :) This will be interesting to say the least. Most of this country isn't so green most of the year.

But if that's what trips your trigger, go for it.
I can't help but agree here....

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Electric 110v plug in motors would be a good idea. The customer pays for the power to run them, the motors last forever and the right ones have incredible power. I have a 1/4 HP trimmer I bought at Sears around 1979. It was listed as their best. They had the good, better and best thing going back then. The most expensive gas trimmer they had was $190 and this electric one was $225. I couldn't pull the trigger at that price. Later it was on sale for $175 and I bought it. 36 years later it still runs like a champ. I have had neighbors, my brothers and friends all look on in fear and amazement when they comment on how powerful it is. Then I show them what it is like on Hi. Hi is crazy powerful and I never use it. LOL!

I will take a picture later. I use it every year and have never done anything to it. If someone was to come by and challenge me to a trimmer contest with their gas powered trimmer I am quite confident they will leave with their tails between their legs. You would need roughly a 4-6 HP gas motor to have the same power and the engine weight would be too heavy. Just like a 70 HP electric Tesla has the same power as a 400 HP gas engine car but the electric motor gets to peak power instantly. I can't hold the trigger on this thing. It has to be pulsed or things get out of hand.
It's only limitation is the 300 foot PA system power cable I use. My property road frontage is 585 feet so I have it covered. I admit that gas powered trimmers offer greater freedom though. But pure trimming power is not an issue and battery life doesn't come into play.
 

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I do not own any battery powered tools like drills,saws,etc...never liked them,batteries die to soon,cost to much to replace,and chargers often croak too,and cant always be had new..also cordless drills are too bulky to fit in many places a corded one will...

About the only tool I used that was battery powered and liked,was a sawsall,at the junkyard for cutting parts off--but you were lucky to get the parts off before the battery died 90% of the time..mostly we used it only where the torches were too much of a fire hazard..

Years ago my dad had a Sunbeam electric snowblower and a lawn mower,both were 110V and had plenty of guts to mow thick tall grass or throw snow--we had a large flat roofed garage that had to have the roof shoveled off if more than a foot of snow fell,the trolley car beam used as the main roof support would sag otherwise--the electric snowblower was a lot easier to get up onto the roof and use..

I like my electric chain saw that runs on 110V,my only complaint with that is they put a cord 6" long on it,that unplugs itself constantly..and the fact you cant run it more than 100 feet away from an outlet...unless you use a generator with it..

There is a lithium battery plant about 1/4 mile from my house--twice in the past couple of years they had some powerful explosions and a fire there,when the batteries they were assembling in a sealed room got moisture somehow and exploded..
I felt my house shake both times!..I have seen what some laptop and cell phone batteries can do too when they decide to have a meltdown,I don't trust them really..

Call me old fashioned,but I like tools that have to be plugged in...
 

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The only lithium things I have are my Milwaukee drill, impact, grinder and Sawzall. They are awesome and have come a long way. But I don't use them everyday

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I just bought this Dewalt FLEXVOLT 60-Volt Lithium-Ion Cordless Brushless 7-1/4 in. Circular Saw. The battery can be used on other 20 volt dewalt tools. It automatedly goes from 60 to 20 volts for the other tools. I haven’t used it yet, but am expecting great things for this. It cuts 339 2x4’s, 6 hours running time.
 

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Rider on the Storm
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I'm starting to switch over to all battery OPE and even vehicles. I'm REALLY interested in the Tesla pickup truck that Elon Musk has tweeted about (to be built after the Model Y). My EGO leaf blower has been excellent, and I plan to stay with that battery ecosystem as I replace my OPE. I don't do commercial work, so for a homeowner, they are great tools!
 

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I also got an EGO leaf blower (backpack model) . It’s plenty strong, with the main limitation that thr battery lasts only about 30min. It looks cool like thr equipment in thr Ghostbusters movie.

I wish there would be LI- Ion powered riding lawn mowers for larger yards. I think we will get these in a couple of years. i only know of thr Ryobi 38” rider, but this one still uses conventional batteries as far as I know. I think the time is ripe for Deere to come up with something. I think in 10 years, most lawn tractors will be electric, except those for commercial or farm use.
 

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I have several Ryobi 40 volt tools which I use often. Also a couple of battery powered drills. I see that Home Depot now sells a 40 volt Ryobi lawn mower so I'm sure you will get your wish sooner or later. But I don't understand why your so enamored with batteries. They are handy when they work but I have yet to have a battery tool that the batteries haven't crapped out long before the tool itself wore out. The higher the voltage the quicker it seems to happen.

The tools perform very well. But what's the sense of throwing away perfectly good tools only because a new one with a new battery can usually be purchased for less than a new replacement battery? The ugly truth is that even in auto's these batteries fail and more often then not the owners simply buy a new car or tool.

If you're one of those who think you're saving the planet, your also disillusioned. Battery power devices appear to be efficient in your hand but they are one of the largest energy wasters man has created. By the time the power company generates the electricity, transports it to you home and run it through a charger you have already burned more carbon than an equivalent gasoline powered tool doing the same job. Haven't even talked about the energy and pollution used to manufacture the batteries. And we haven't talked about the energy wasted with the batteries setting in a charger when not in use. All you can say is that your moving the pollution to someone else's back yard. And then all of those batteries need to be disposed of, recycled or whatever, yet consuming more power and creating more pollution to do that. All to save a few puffs of exhaust.

An equivalent gas powered mower, trimmer or blower might consume a few ounces of fuel to do the same job as a similar battery powered device. But that's pretty much the end of it. The fuel is always available at the local gas station. The transportation and production costs are included. The electricity used in a battery tool is hidden in your electric bill. Out of sight, out of mind. The only case for battery powered tools is convenience. Until the battery goes dead. Then you either wait until tomorrow to finish whatever your doing or, as most, pull out the gas or corded powered tool and finish the job.

Most folks I know use these tools to maintain their property. They take pride in the results but want it done ASAP. Not wait around for a battery to charge. I think John Deere knows that. But if there is a buck to be made selling what you want, they likely will do it.

One last thing. Ryobi is replacing defective 40v batteries free. Just stop by the local HD to get the 800 number. No questions asked. Seems they have an issue with them. Surprise! They do ask you to dispose of them properly. You know, throw them in your gasoline powered pickup and haul them to (ah someplace)
 

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I am not a tree hugger, but I prefer battery powered tools over gasoline ones, whenever possible. The energy savings are negligible, but the main advantage of battery tools that they require less maintenance (oil changes carburetors), no smelly gasoline/oil mixes are quiter and don’t produce any exhaust. You also don’t have to be afraid that a tool doesn’t start up because it has been sitting for a while. So for tools that are only occasionally used (which applies to most noncommercial homeowners tools) battery powered is way to go. I also don’t think battery power loss is as big of a concern than it has been in the past, these LI Ion batteries hold their power much better than the Ni Cad batteries from way back than.


I would appreciate, if larger tools like large are walk behind mower or riding mowers would be electrified and I think it is inevitable, not because of irrational treehugger arguments, but because they are getting better for most uses than gasoline engine powered tools.
 
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