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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My dad is 72 years old. He finally caved in to pressure from his kids and his friends and bought a new hopefully dependable Husqvarna chainsaw.

He had 2 saws that he has complained about for years. He had open heart surgery earlier this year and he didn't beleive he would ever be able to crank them because they both took so many pulls to start. One was a Wild Thing 2175 which he dropped off at my house for my occassional use.

I got ready to use it and I noticed that it wasn't priming. On closer listen, the primer bulb was whistling, and when I turned the saw over, it leaked fuel at the primer, so I assume the primer bulb has a split in it.

I checked Jack's Small Engines and he lists several primer bulbs based on the carburetor model, so I will have to inspect more closely to choose the right one.

My real question is would it be worth it? A $5.00 primer bulb is no big deal, but the fact that the saw has always required great effort to start and that it is not a newer saw makes me wonder if it will be greater frustration than it is worth.

Temper your advice from this perspective: I didn't own a saw previously so this is my first one.

Thanks,

Steve
 

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I'll almost guarantee you that you'll need to replace the fuel line, too.

I've had one before. I actually liked mine. Apparently someone else did, too... it was stolen out of the barn :(

The Poulan that I replaced it with wasn't worth the money (if it HAD been free). I ended up giving it to a friend of mine so he could try and fix it.

I ended up buying a Husqvarna (455 Rancher). Best move I've ever made (at least in regards to chainsaws).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll almost guarantee you that you'll need to replace the fuel line, too.
You know, it could be the fuel line that is whistling when I depress the bulb. I haven't looked that closely. That would be a cheaper fix than the bulb.

So, when you had your WT, how many pulls did it generally take to cold start it?
 

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The Magnificent
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My wild thing takes about 4 pulls to start when cold. It's 7 years old. It's littel Craftsman brother (also made by Poulan) takes 2, and it's 14 years old.
 

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I've got a Poulan and I just bought an Echo, that tell you my thoughts on it GBG. It stalls, no power, can't keep the chain tight etc.
Only reason I haven't swung it upside a tree is I wanted a beater for cutting close to/ on the ground.....Mike
 

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Jack of All Trades
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One of my dealer reps was by recently to introduce me to their offering of Poulan factory refurb units. The Wild Thing was listed on the sheet, but he said they were not offering it because it was always back ordered. Apparently there are very few returned to the factory as bad, so therefore no refurb units are available. For the occasional homeowner I would recommend the Poulan line and based on low rate of returns, if The Wild Thing was mine, I would repair it. If you could see my "dead pile" of 2 cycles not worth repairing, you would understand that repairing this on is saying a lot.
 

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For some reason the Wild Thing is the only newer Poulan that many people seem to like. I would go ahead and do a primer bulb, fuel lines, and fuel cap. The cap on these machines likes to either leak or not vent after a few years. As to the hard starting you may just need a carb adjustment or some new diaphragms. I have a Poulan 2050, 2155, and 4620. I've given them lots of use (not abuse) over the years and taken good care of them. All of them start easily and perform as well as when they were new-actually better since the horrible factory chains were replaced by Oregons. If your WT has the factory chain it will never cut very well.
 

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I have a Poulan Wild Thing, I have had it about 8 years or so. I can not complain, it has been a good saw for the money(50 bucks used). If I follow the directions for starting as printed on the saw, it normally fires right up with just 2 or 3 pulls. I always run all of the gas out of it before I put it up.

It is pretty tough, too. One time, the spark plug went bad while I was on the roof trimming branches back from the house in 100 degree heat. After several attempts to restart it (not realizing the plug was bad) :banghead3 and a ton of sweat, it "accidentally" "slipped" off the roof onto the ground. Bent the bar. Once it cooled down outside, I replaced the bar, and the spark plug, and has been running great ever since. (guess I scared it into working good)
 

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I have a 3314 poulan that I got on ebay for about $50. This little saw starts easy and runs great.
 

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Gotta keep and eye on the cylinder bolts on any Poulan/Craftsman product made within the last 10 years or so. Once they loosen, then tend to destroy the threads due to vibration, and most times, the tool becomes trash.
 

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Also check the muffler bolts, they like to back out after awhile too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Since I seem to be on a trend for recycling my old threads, I'll dust this one off as well.

I set the chainsaw aside after getting so much advice on it. I simply dind't have time to deal with projects like this that didn't translate into income for my family for a little while, and if you look araound, you'll see that I've finally gotten back on task and am trying to catch up with my projects.

Anyway, I have pulled the Wild Thing saw out of the storage building and am trying to get it running again. I have set a $ limit for the repair parts I am willing to buy for it, but I do want to give it a chance.

Here's what I have found: the saw cleans up nicely. My wife wiped down the plastic panels as I was taking them off. It obviously had some TLC while my dad had it, and probably was well cared for before he picked it up.

The fuel lines were toast; no doubt the victims of ethanol exposure. The primer and bulb are intact, the fuel filter is clean, and the carb looks good (after only visual inspection).

As I began researching, I hit a snag. Apparently, Poulan keeps the same model numbers for a while, leaving us to refer to the ones from different eras as Type 1, 2, 3, etc. This one is a 1999 model.

I've bought a kit to replace the lines (wrong) and then I bought 1/8" ID line from a shop (wrong) based on a howto writeup I found on another site. I finally found a PDF of the exploded drawing for Types 1-5 and it appears based on Poulan Part #s that what I need is actually:

Large 3/16 OD 3/32 ID
Small 0.140 OD 0.080 ID

I've bought a fuel pickup/filter already, so I'm going to go to a local Husqvarna dealer with the measurements above and buy the lines one more time. If this doesn't work, I may be selling some Wild Thing parts on eBay!

Steve
 

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Local OPE dealers should have the parts you need.

I was surprised to find that my local AutoZone stores have 3/16OD 3/32ID Tygon fuel line, primer bulbs, and a few other small engine parts hanging on cards and ready to buy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
OK, so I went to the Husqvarna dealer and picked up the correct fuel lines. I followed the instructions in this video
which seemed more consistent with the 2175 I have than the written instructions located here because the carb on mine doesn't have a "black plastic upper fitting", it has two brass fittings.

I ran the larger fuel return line from the "out" fitting on the primer to the return fitting inside the fuel tank. I ran the smaller fuel supply line from the "in" fitting on the primer to the bottom brass fitting on the carb, and then the second small line from the top brass fitting on the carb to the filter inside the tank.

When I press the primer bulb, it fills with fuel as it should. When I reassembled the saw and tried to crank it, it seemed to try on the first pull, but then it just sputters on successive pulls.

I will go to the store and get another spark plug if that's the advice I get, but the plug doesn't appear to be fouled or faulty. I checked the gap and it was at .020 so I adjusted it to .025, but the result is the same.

I know I need a new air filter, but that won't stop it from firing. What I am wondering about is the High and Low adjustment screw settings. I've only been around when this saw ran one time, and that was a while before it was given to me. How can I be certain they are properly adjusted and can improper adjustment of them result in the saw not cranking at all?

In case it isn't obvious, I know nothing about chainsaw repair. I've used them a dozen or so times, but they've always been saws that cranked easily and ran correctly.

HELP!!!!!!!!!!!

Steve
 

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Curious Steve, and if you have already went over it earlier, I apologize. But have you cleaned the carb? The fact that it will run with pressurized fuel, but not after, could be a sign of blockage. Also, as it's been sitting and had decaying fuel lines adds up to needing a good thorough cleaning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Curious Steve, and if you have already went over it earlier, I apologize. But have you cleaned the carb? The fact that it will run with pressurized fuel, but not after, could be a sign of blockage. Also, as it's been sitting and had decaying fuel lines adds up to needing a good thorough cleaning.
Nope. I don't know as to how I know how to clean one. I feel safe and secure in spraying carb cleaner, but I've never tried taking one apart.

I did get the advice this morning from a co-worker that I need to turn the High and Low screws all the way to the right and then back them off about 1-1/2 turns. The video above said 1-1/2 turns, but it assumed the viewer knew which way to turn them.
 

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Nope. I don't know as to how I know how to clean one. I feel safe and secure in spraying carb cleaner, but I've never tried taking one apart.

I did get the advice this morning from a co-worker that I need to turn the High and Low screws all the way to the right and then back them off about 1-1/2 turns. The video above said 1-1/2 turns, but it assumed the viewer knew which way to turn them.
I understand. Truth is, in most cases it's really not that difficult. Taking good pics to remember how things were, and taking some notes. There's plenty of info on the net. I take them off and soak them a day or so, in mineral spirits, or the like. Then clean them good and re-install. I'm not an expert, but I have brought many small engines back to life with a good carb cleaning. If I can, you can :fing32:
 

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A Wild Thang is not worth putting $5 into parts. Friends don't let friends run Wild Thangs.:Stop:
 
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