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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a 7117 for my 7112 mostly to get the hitch, lift cable and lift bar now Im ready to sell it. It has NO engine or deck. As I expected I have not been getting any offers.

So Im going to wait another week or so and scrap it. What parts would you keep if you owned the 7112?
Steering/Suspension parts?
Maybe a wheel?
Battery cable?
Any parts likely to go out?

I would just keep the thing but on an acre room is getting sort of sparse.

See my for sale ad if anyone is interested.

Thanks!
 

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If all your going to get is scrap price for it your likely better off just keeping it for spare parts.
The wheels, steering, front axle, spindles etc all fit yours and anyone of those parts will likely cost you more than you will get in scrap for the whole tractor.I don't suppose it'll bring more than $10 in scrap right now.
Maybe trade the rolling chassis for something you can use?

I've sold a few rolling chassis like that, everyone brought over $200.
I've only had a few decks for those over the years, not having a deck has never really hindered selling one. It seem most don't use them for mowing anyhow. Most want a snow plow or rear hitch and garden plow more. They're tough machines and seem best suited as workhorses than mowers it seems.
Rear axles and differentials, bevel gear boxes and steering parts are most in demand on those models, plus complete working transaxles.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ended up selling most for scrap. I kept the front end, wiring harness and gauges, engine mount, sheet metal. I would have kept the entire thing but space is adequate, no more.
I've had very little luck selling things lately online, my mother in law had a passing in her family and has little luck either. I suppose it's the Wuhan virus.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Oh, I was going to ave the steering but couldn't get the wheel off, rusted on.
 

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Thats why I dont try to sell anything-----never had any luck!
 

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I've removed dozens of those wheels to replace upper steering bushings which are always rotted.
I never had one of those wheels get stuck, the through bolt makes them easy to remove compared to most. At the very worst, I suppose you could have sacrificed the wheel by cutting it off to be able to remove the steering shaft. I keep a couple of spare steering columns, a complete front axle, a few extra spindles, and a spare rear end for mine on the shelf in the garage, plus I've got a few parts machines outback that could easily be made running as spares.
Around here, Simplicity is one of the brands that does sell, there's no dealer so the interest in them has always been higher here than the more common green or yellow tractors.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Cutting it off would have been a good idea, I had trouble with the little bolt that locks it in. It was rusted fierce and I didn't feel like drilling it out.
 

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I don't think I've ever had one so much as put up a fight in all the years I've owned Simplicity tractors.
The norm was always finding the bolt wallowed out or loose, or missing completely with some oddball fastener jammed in the hole. I had one where someone jammed a roll pin in there, but it came right out, and another where they had ground away a good bit of the steering wheel hub in order to fit a tractor pin and clip on in there. The steering wheels are usually loose or wobbly, or you find that the insert has spun in the wheel and the steering just slips.

I picked up a clean looking 7116 a couple of years ago that wouldn't steer. The column was seized up tight.
The top bushing was frozen to the shaft and the rubber around i was ripped to shreds. The thing had a ton of oil all over the dash and lower steering where someone had been pouring oil down the shaft opening to no avail. They had taken grinder to the lower part of the steering wheel and ground away about 3" worth of plastic exposing the inner steel sleeve. They then took a piece of all thread about 5" long, a stack of washers and two nuts to secure the wheel, When the wheel slipped on the sleeve, they started shoving self tapping screws into the plastic till they split the wheel completely in half.
The rest of the machine looked new. I got it for $11 at auction. I brought it home, removed the messed up steering wheel, cut and split the stuck bushing off the shaft, installed a new bushing and a good used wheel and have been using it ever since. The hardest part was getting it out of the auction field not being able to steer it. The auction was in a mowed down corn field with 5" tall stumps of corn stalks sticking up all over the place and the rows were pure mud. I ended up backing up to the end of one row and winching the thing to my trailer from about 200 feet away.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I put a vice grips on it (one of the old good ones) and really put torque on it after clamping hard. After reading your experiences I'm now wondering if someone didn't put a big dab of locktite or liquidweld on it.
 

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Sounds more like galvanic corrosion or a welder got to it.
The original bolts are 5/16" and fairly soft, they fit kind of loose in the hole in she shaft. If he bolt is loose, mine will have play left to right in the steering because the boat has room to move a bit. I've also sheared a few fighting against stiff steering or ice build up on one Allis Chalmers I had.
 
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