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Discussion Starter #1
First I rebuilt the carburetor, then it ran so good that I invested in aggressive tires and a dozer blade. Used a Harbor Freight winch to lift the blade since I didn't have the correct hardware for the stock lever.

Long story, but I'm pretty certain the positive battery cable shorted to the chassis. The 30-amp fuse didn't blow, but the tractor won't start. Turns over fine, just won't fire. What do you suggest I start checking?
 

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Edit: reread- turns over

Likely you have a wiring issue. Doubt anything more serious.

Pull your plug cable and test it however you like: stick finger in it, short screw driver, spare spark plug, etc
 

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Hoosier Daddy
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Battery cables reversed will spin the starter backwards so the pinion gear won't extend, which is an interesting phenomena.

If you didn't mess with the battery cables, maybe check for spark. If no spark, unhook the coil's kill wire and see if you get spark then.
If not, it may be the coil. If power were somehow supplied to that kill wire, the coil would almost certainly fry itself.
 

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Most times dropping a hot wire onto the chassis will result in sparks, smoke and if left long enough, melted insulation. The current would flow through the wire, through the chassis, and to the negative battery post.
The only way it would affect other things is if it(the current) took a side trip through them on its way to the battery.
All the above is if the cable in question(the hot one) was wired directly to the battery + terminal. If routed/connected via other bits and pieces, they can get affected. A direct route equals a direct short, and would mean a lot of current flow.
I would check for spark as noted above, and likely disconnect the magneto completely(kill wire) when cranking the engine over to test.
One other thing that's electric is the ABF solenoid valve on the bottom of the float bowl. If it tried to conduct a lot of amps, it could get fried. You should be able to make it operate using a 9-volt battery. Connect and hear it click at each application of power. If quiet, measure ohms across the power/ground connectors. It should not be 'open', but have measurable resistance.
tom
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for your help, guys. I tested for spark with an induction timing light, and nope, no spark. I tested with kill wire attached and detached.

I may have been mistaken about the short circuit. I'd presumed such, but can't find evidence of sparking on the suspect terminal or on the hood where I thought it had shorted. And recall that the 30-amp fuse wasn't burned. Looks like a coincidence; that the coil failed about the time my winch shifted and I presumed the winch positive post had shorted to the hood.

Off to search for an OLD part number. Hahahaha--Sears used more model numbers back in the day than I can believe, and this tractor seems to be a real oddball.
 

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Better make darned sure you aren't or haven't accidentally fed 12 volts to the coil as that will kill it instantly. Of course these coils do fail but not a high frequency thing, they are very reliable which is why you really need to check as I said. Especially since you just added an electric wench.
Walt Conner
 

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Pull the number for the engine model, you will get further than the sears number.

Are you measuring anything across the coil? And will your flywheel magnets hold a wrench?

Depending one which engine you have, some of the flywheel magnets are glued on and have been known to fall off if impacted. Just so you are aware.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I downloaded a copy of the tractor owner's manual after I bought it five or so years ago, so I was able to find the engine number (422707) and then found a Magnatron Ignition Trigger Coil Assembly on eBay for ten bucks. I know I should have tested the old one first but I need to drag the tractor closer to the house before I start taking things apart. And spending ten bucks is well-deserved penance for neglecting this poor thing for so many years.

Sure do love owner's manuals and owner forums! Seems I've had to learn weird intricacies for every vehicle I own, and now small tractors! Would be easier if I was a mechanic-hahaha!
 
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