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The bearings on my brush hog have weakened to the point where I don't dare use it anymore. I have the parts list from the Ingersoll website and I can't for the life of me figure out how to take the **** thing apart. (Which is kinda a weird b/c I can destroy just about anything (usually by accident, though).

The parts list shows #20 as a 1/4 bolt. My assembly does not have a bolt. It has some sort of locking pin where the bolt should be located. It appears to need a specialized tool to unlock/release the center pin. After several hours of futzing (even borrowed a pneumatic air-hammer chisel -- back to that destruction angle) I am no closer to figuring this puzzle out than I was before.

I would appreciate any help.

Thanks in advance.

Todd
 

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If you look at the parts list, the Hydra-Cutter uses four of item 20. Two of them are used to secure the bushing into the drive pulley and the other two are used on the driven pulley. The drawing gives no indication that these fasteners are what's keeping the pulley on the shaft. For sure, the shaft is keyed but that key is positioned above the castellated nut that tensions the tapered roller races.

Maybe they're using drive rivets. These are round top fasteners with a spiral knurled shank on them and get hammered into a hole a few thou smaller in diameter. Have you tried looking for a set screw located somewhere in the belt sheave area? Time to get out the strong light and look for an allen socket head in that groove.
 

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Some close up photos might help us think through this problem with you. The parts diagram clearly shows the pulley bushing is press fit into the pulley so the 1/4" bolts are used to pull the bushing into the pulley; I imagine that bushing is also split so it will clamp on the spindle when tightened. I would start by liberally soaking everything with penetrating oil over a couple of days to give it time to work. Then wire brush the pins/bolts or whatever are in the holes to see if they are allen screws or just bolts that have the heads rounded off. You'll need to get them out of the holes eventually so I'd take it easy with the air chisel. See if you can grip the heads with vise grips and turn them out. If it is impossible to get them out then you may need to grind the heads off and then use a puller and/or a couple of pry bars to remove the bushing. Once the bushing is out you hopefully will have enough of the bolts sticking out to grab with the visegrips.

The key to doing all this successfully is lots of penetrating oil soaking the parts over several days.
 

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If it's a brownning bushing you take the bolts out of the holes they are in and screw them into the hole with out... This will force the bushing out ...
 

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I'll start this post with stating I don't have a hydracutter and have not yet had instance to service one. Guess I need another machine in my demonstrator lineup ... but wow that things takes up a lot of space!

So ... going on a limb here, I'm inclined to believe that bushing does not need to be taken out of the spindle drive pulley. It appears to be a standard ID sizing bushing which allows a common pulley to be used on may applications. The castle nut is above the bushing ... right? I know the diagram doesn't look that way, but with mower in hand that part will of course be obvious. (I don't imagine how else it would actually work).

All mower spindle shafts have a nasty habit of getting very well attached to the pulleys and/or bearings over time. The patient application of penetrating oil is a well advised route ... and will still then take some real force to move the spindle ... be sure to protect those threads and not with a castle nut! Apply a generous coating of anti-sieze before it goes back together ...

Brian
 
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