My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off I would like to thank all of the knowledgeable members of this forum. It is because of your selfless efforts and vast insight to these tractors, that guys like myself are able to keep these amazing tractors running at their peak. i am in the precess gaining info,I might be able to pass on in the future to others in need. Thank You.

Now time for more begging. I have a B98-B Hydra Bagger mounted on a 1978 446. I plumbed in an oil return line off the hydraulic blower. When I engage the blower, I lose ground speed. I am assuming it is related to the return line. I noticed the older blower motors do not have this line. What is the purpose and what would be the pros/cons of installing a non return line blower motor?

It takes a little longer to cut the yard with the bagger on. The tractor seems to be under more engine "load" also when pulling any type of a grade. I have a hilly, rolling type of lot. 2.5 acres of it.
I also have a 222 and that little tractor seems to go twice as fast as my 446.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
Top speed on the LO PRO's has pretty much been faster than on the Hi -Wheeler's. Fact of life....

There should not be very much oil coming out of that third line. It's there to protect the seals from undue pressure. The engine is now being asked to run three things. Your deck, the bagger and the drive motor. The combo load may be causing engine RPM to drop. If so, pump output drops too and that will slow the travel speed down.

Going to a motor without the case drain isn't going to make a noticeable difference and you wouldn't like the price of that motor from the Ingy dealer. As long as you plumbed that line into the return line somewhere before it reaches the oil cooler,then you should be good to go. You could always remove the line, plug the T temporarily and then start the tractor, engage the HydraBagger, go to wide open throttle and see how much oil flow you are getting from that hose.

If you have a clean one gallon container, you could time how long it takes to fill it.
 

·
Ingersoll Dealer
Joined
·
2,552 Posts
Agree Castoff's comments, as usual.

There is definitely more engine and pump load when running the bagger, and certainly more noticeable on hills.

Many things can affect the circuit here, including travel valve adjustment (running higher oil temps), condition of the pump (running elevated pressures), and of course the motor drain itself.

The motor drain should really only be a dribble ... not a strong flow ... when running the motor normally. (Non drain motors are only available used at this point ...)

Let us know what you find.

Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I guess I will just accept it the way it is for now. I might sometime in the future change out the hydraulic pump. I was just curious as this is my first experience with Case garden tractors. I just need some reassurance that all is well. Once again I thank the Case guru's.
Terry:not_worth:not_worth
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
I might sometime in the future change out the hydraulic pump.

That's not something you do without giving it some thought.

Right now, your tractor has a "balanced" hydraulic system in it that is designed to meet the demands of the tractor and attachments. Putting in a smaller or larger pump changes that balance and performance can suffer as a result. A pump is not a "stand alone" item. It takes X amount of hp to turn a pump of a certain size. If you put in a larger pump, then it takes more hp to spin that pump at 3600 rpm.

Not that long ago, I was helping a fellow with a 444 that complained about his rototiller being nearly useless. He'd lower it into the ground and it would just stop spinning. After a few questions I found out that he had owned this tractor for many years and the tiller had always performed well. He decided to replace his pump because he thought it was well-worn a month back. I asked him to tell me the make and model of the pump he bought. Turns out he went to a larger pump so that the tiller tines would spin faster and he could get his tilling done quicker.

The 14 hp Kohler could no longer spin that larger pump when the tiller asked for the high pressures needed to break virgin ground so it just stalled and sat there. He went out and bought the correct size of pump and all his problems with his tiller went away.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top