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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Could anyone tell me the best way to drain the hyd fluid on a case 444, fluid seems to be getting hot then driveline doesn't work as well, if anyone can give me info it would be greatly appreiated. just got it 1970s model
 

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Remove the deck from the tractor.

Clean off the underside of the travel/lift valve. This item is directly below the checker plate floor between the seat and the dash.

Look for a hex head plug and then clean that hex out THOROUGHLY.

Insert a Allen key/wrench into this hex opening ALL THE WAY and use a wrench that is in excellent condition. These plugs are often very tight and many times they have not been removed.......EVER ......in thirty plus years. You get ONE SHOT at turning this plug and that's why I am stressing the cleaning of the hex and the use of a new, quality made wrench. This is not only the drain plug but it is also the crucial hydraulic test port for the hydraulic system.

With the plug out, slide a CLEAN bucket that will hold at least 6 quarts under the valve. Start the tractor at an idle and with your hand on the ignition key, watch the stream of oil exiting the valve. As soon as you see it spurting air, shut the engine down.

Put the plug back in with a bit of anti-seize paste on it or at least some chassis grease to make it easier to remove in the future.

Now... fill the reservoir with either 20W50, 30W or 15W40 MOTOR OIL. Do not use anything else.

If you have a front-mounted tank, then fill to one inch below the top of the actual tank. If you have the tank under the battery, then five inches below the threaded fill neck is the level.

You need to order an Operator's Manual that is correct for the serial number of your tractor from a dealer. We happen to have a dealer right here. His screen name is bhildret. Check some other threads, find him and send Brian a PM. He will mail you a manual quickly and they cost less than $20.00 to your door. These books are an absolute must for every Case or Ingersoll owner to have. Once you receive yours, you will quickly agree.
 

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castoff is right on, you don't know what the PO owner has put in the oil reservoir in place of oil, some put hydraulic fluid or the wrong weight oil. Starting with the right weight is the way to go. Your hydraulic pump may be weak but doing what castoff said will help narrow things down for you. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thank you very for all the info found it to be very helpful, I would even go as far as to say all the info took me from being a case tractor idiot, to a beginer level of a very happy case owner.

PS yes i am actively looking for that dealer on here to get a owners manual.

thank both of you very much
 

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thank you very for all the info found it to be very helpful, I would even go as far as to say all the info took me from being a case tractor idiot, to a beginer level of a very happy case owner.

PS yes i am actively looking for that dealer on here to get a owners manual.

thank both of you very much
Hope you`ve studied up on hydraulic theory / flow rates / g.p.m. and differential equations, these are all on the test given by Castoff at your 25th post point.

E-mail Brian: [email protected]
 

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dmjfairchild3 - Let me add a little here to the already great advise. When I changed (replaced) the hydraulic fluid in my 222 I removed the heat exchanger and while in the area replaced the exchanger hoses on both sides (top and bottom). I thoroughly cleaned the heat exchanger as well. On a cursory inspection of my tractor once I purchased it I couldn't see the buildup of crud between the exchanger fins until I had the hood off and really took a closer look. You may have some buildup in the cooling fins on your heat exchanger as well not allowing the proper air flow. I also took any and all hydraulic oil hoses and tubes off the tractor as I could to drain any trace of the PO's oil out of the tractor as possible even the rear PTO, the upper and lower transaxle pump motor port tubes, the pump hose from the oil reservoir, the solid tube to the heat exchanger etc. If you wanted you could take the rear transaxle pump motor off and drain that as well while you have the upper and lower transaxle pump motor port tubes off. When I changed (replaced) the hydraulic fluid I also replaced the transaxle pump motor so that wasn't really an issue for me at the time. With the exception of replacing the transaxle pump motor and the heat exchanger hoses I plan on doing the whole routine over early spring next year - I already have the oil to do so. Now that I've learned how to do it it'll be much easier next year, right:woohoo1:?
 

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If it's ok with everyone, I'll just add the following.

Let's look at this scenario. You bought a tractor, dismantled it 100 percent and conducted a full restoration. You now have it re-assembled but the tractor is totally "dry" in all respects. So, you put a quart of gas in the tank, fill the trans-axle to the correct level and add oil to the engine's crankcase until it reaches the FULL line on the dipstick. All that's left is the bone-dry hydraulic system.

In truth, the capacity of the hydraulic system has changed a bit over the years but not all that much. The largest capacity is 6.5 quarts of oil to totally fill a bone-dry system. When performing a simple oil change after that, you will need almost six quarts of oil even if you drain the system the way I suggested earlier in this thread. That means you have drained out all the oil except for about one pint.

So, in the overall scheme of things, how important is this last pint of oil? If the system was not contaminated by shrapnel from a pump that disintegrated or sugar having been added to the reservoir, then all we are dealing with here is oil. Perhaps it might be the wrong grade or type of oil but nonetheless, it's still oil. By just draining that oil out and replacing it with the correct oil, we have purged the system of 92 percent of the wrong oil.

The remaining 8 percent will mix with the 92 percent and that 8 percent will not affect the quality of the 92 percent to such a degree that there will be a noticable difference in performance. And if you adhere to the maintenance schedule outlined in the owner's manual, you will be changing that oil one year later anyway. I don't even want to try to do the math to figure out how much of the original oil would still be in the system after the second oil change or the third oil change.

All of the above is based upon you owning a tractor with no front-end loader on it because the oil capacity of the cylinders on a FEL would change everything. And even if you have the optional 3 point hitch, PTO at the rear and a Flow Control Valve, the amount of remaining oil might jump to a full quart or a tad more. In that situation, you could do back-to-back oil changes on the same day and instantly remove close to 100 percent of the original oil.

Now, without question, Kdursus makes some good points, especially with the thorough cleaning of the oil cooler fins. That's really important because keeping the temp of the oil under control is vital to the performance of the system and to component life. While it is good to be very meticulous in the servicing of your tractor, it isn't necessary to take the hydraulic system apart for a routine oil change nor is it really advisable to do so. Disturbing all those connections that are currently tight and not leaking can lead to connection that do leak. This is one of those "let sleeping dogs lay" situations, IMO. Choose the simpler route and play it safe.

On the other hand, if the system was contaminated with foreign matter that was not of a liquid nature, then I would agree with Kdursus 100 percent that dismantling each component and thoroughly flushing it clean would be the best way to proceed.
 

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Castoff, would the instructions for replacing the hydraulic oil be the same for an Ingy 3118? Below is a picture. The black arrow points to what I am assuming to be the drain plug.


Thanks,
Tom
 

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Snowcastor
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Tractom

No it's not, That's the adjustment for the built in flow control.

The drain is bigger and comes out the bottom of the valve. 1/4 NPT

224-79

PS. Draining the two systems is the same
 

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Ingersoll Dealer
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As noted, the drain plug is oriented vertical, in the passage just behind the return oil pipe connection. (The large pipe at the TCV, not the pressure hose coming in from the pump).

Simple allen head pipe plug in that port ... can sometimes be hidden above other hoses, so you might need to hunt a bit.

Brian
 

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Thanks guys, I found it and job done. That completes all my maintenance for now. This forum is a great help and I appreciate people sharing their knowledge. I am incredibly happy with the tractor (3118PS) - as most of you said I would be. Once I got the carb clean, the engine runs excellent and this thing has power to spare. Already used the mower, hydrovac, and blade and can't wait to try out the snow blower this winter!
Thanks again.
Tom
 
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