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Discussion Starter #1
Loved it for two seasons... Then did the unthinkable. Grabbed the wrong gas can when I filled it up.. Pure gas. No oil.

Ran it 4-5 minutes when I realized what I did. I shut it off, cleaned out gas tank but it wont start.

I've read that many people have still been able to use their 2-cycle after such a bone headed thing .

I can't get mine to run.


Anyone know any tricks?

I have no compression tester but it "feels" about the same as before .

Any thoughts?

Thanks.
 

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Take plug out and check to see if you are getting spark. Normally a 2 cycle engine will seize up when it doesn't have lubricant mixed with the gas. So if that didn't happen then you may want to check to see if spark is the issue.
 

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I've retrieved a few dead 2 stroke weed whackers and chain saws from the curb on rubbish day, that had been run on straight gas,they still were able to turn over ,not seized up,and had some compression and spark..

To get them to start I had to remove the spark plug and squirt some motor oil in the hole to lube the cylinder & piston to help seal them and the rings and improve the compression enough to get them to start and run..they smoked like crazy for awhile,and if you shut them off ,you sometimes had to repeat the process to get then to fire back up again..

Any 2 stroke thats been run with straight gas has to suffer some cylinder scoring and the rings will be worn some,and it may feel like it has good compression,but it may just be the friction against the piston to cylinder wall your feeling,its not true compression..
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yep, I've got spark.
While I've no doubt not done it any good, the Piston feels free, not close to being siezed up.

I put an ounce of brake fluid in the cylinder twice and let it sit.
Was told that would free the Rings from the Piston to regain compression, but no noticable difference.

I was also told compression is very important on a 2cycle. I assume I've lost too much for it to run.

I guess I'll just have to eat this blower.

Now one to blame but me.

Maybe I'll but another one and use this one for parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've retrieved a few dead 2 stroke weed whackers and chain saws from the curb on rubbish day, that had been run on straight gas,they still were able to turn over ,not seized up,and had some compression and spark..

To get them to start I had to remove the spark plug and squirt some motor oil in the hole to lube the cylinder & piston to help seal them and the rings and improve the compression enough to get them to start and run..they smoked like crazy for awhile,and if you shut them off ,you sometimes had to repeat the process to get then to fire back up again..

Any 2 stroke thats been run with straight gas has to suffer some cylinder scoring and the rings will be worn some,and it may feel like it has good compression,but it may just be the friction against the piston to cylinder wall your feeling,its not true compression..

I'll try that, nothing to loose.

Thanks
 

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A long time poster, Red, used to measure string trimmer compression by holding the trimmer by the pull cord handle. If it slowly bip-bip-bip'd to the ground, he said, "Bad. Poor compression." He was using the weight of the engine as the measuring stick.
That said, check for a replacement piston/cylinder. Many are available at pretty low cost compared to the replacement cost of the trimmer. I was able to get a 32cc set for a good price on my WeedEater brand, which would cost a good bit, close to $200 to replace. (When I bought, I was ignorant, and got more than I needed.)
Taking it apart and re-assembly was similar to a puzzle, so if you decide to repair, pay attention to sequence. Maybe take pictures?
A quick search and I get the impression parts would be less than $40...
tom

Added: I had never done any 2-stroke work at all, and it took a bit to figure out how to get the rings compressed. I lubed them(one?) well, and wiggled the rings past the 'cone' area successfully. Learned. IOW, don't be afraid of it, someone was able to put it together successfully before you, so you have a good chance.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
A long time poster, Red, used to measure string trimmer compression by holding the trimmer by the pull cord handle. If it slowly bip-bip-bip'd to the ground, he said, "Bad. Poor compression." He was using the weight of the engine as the measuring stick.
That said, check for a replacement piston/cylinder. Many are available at pretty low cost compared to the replacement cost of the trimmer. I was able to get a 32cc set for a good price on my WeedEater brand, which would cost a good bit, close to $200 to replace. (When I bought, I was ignorant, and got more than I needed.)
Taking it apart and re-assembly was similar to a puzzle, so if you decide to repair, pay attention to sequence. Maybe take pictures?
A quick search and I get the impression parts would be less than $40...
tom

Added: I had never done any 2-stroke work at all, and it took a bit to figure out how to get the rings compressed. I lubed them(one?) well, and wiggled the rings past the 'cone' area successfully. Learned. IOW, don't be afraid of it, someone was able to put it together successfully before you, so you have a good chance.
They are fairly simple engines, but I haven't torn small engine down that far since the 70s.

It's worth considering for $40 ...


Thanks for the input!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've retrieved a few dead 2 stroke weed whackers and chain saws from the curb on rubbish day, that had been run on straight gas,they still were able to turn over ,not seized up,and had some compression and spark..

To get them to start I had to remove the spark plug and squirt some motor oil in the hole to lube the cylinder & piston to help seal them and the rings and improve the compression enough to get them to start and run..they smoked like crazy for awhile,and if you shut them off ,you sometimes had to repeat the process to get then to fire back up again..

Any 2 stroke thats been run with straight gas has to suffer some cylinder scoring and the rings will be worn some,and it may feel like it has good compression,but it may just be the friction against the piston to cylinder wall your feeling,its not true compression..
I've retrieved a few dead 2 stroke weed whackers and chain saws from the curb on rubbish day, that had been run on straight gas,they still were able to turn over ,not seized up,and had some compression and spark..

To get them to start I had to remove the spark plug and squirt some motor oil in the hole to lube the cylinder & piston to help seal them and the rings and improve the compression enough to get them to start and run..they smoked like crazy for awhile,and if you shut them off ,you sometimes had to repeat the process to get then to fire back up again..

Any 2 stroke thats been run with straight gas has to suffer some cylinder scoring and the rings will be worn some,and it may feel like it has good compression,but it may just be the friction against the piston to cylinder wall your feeling,its not true compression..

I'll try that, nothing to loose.

Thanks
UP DATE
I never would have guessed putting 3 or 4 hundred CC OF OIL ON TOP OF THE PISTON WOULD HAVE MADE SUCH A DIFFERENCE!!!

It started in two pulls I ran it for about 4 minutes then shut it down. Afraid someone would call the fire department from all the smoke... But it ran!
 
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