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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 1980 Horse that I bought new and am in the process of going through the whole thing doing everything it needs to last another 28 years.

The biggest unforeseen problem I have encountered was getting the wheel off the axle shaft. Like most on this forum I read the manual and tried the usual methods recommended by Troy Bilt. I figured right away that I did not have enough years left to wait for the penetrating oil to loosen things up. So here's what will work.

I made a puller from a couple of pieces of rebar (flat bar will work) and an eight inch piece of 1/4 by 2x2 angle iron. You will need to have some sort of jack also. I bought a 2 ton bottle jack from the local parts store but later discovered that that was not large enough so I went back and traded it for a six ton.

Cut the flat bar or round stock long enough to accommodate the length of your jack. Then tack weld the flat bar or round stock to the wheel right next to the axle hole. Do this on both sides of the axle hole. Angle the flat bar out so that it forms a V and then weld the angle iron across the two pieces.

Your welds will have to be pretty stout but don't over do it since you will be grinding them off later to return the wheel to original condition.

Put the jack base on the angle iron and use a socket or piece or round bar to slip inside the axel so that it presses on the wheel shaft inside the wheel hub.

As I mentioned the first jack I used (a two ton) was not enough. I'd say I had about 3 or 4 tons on the wheel and I didn't want to break the welds so I then applied heat to the inside of the wheel hub staying away from the rim area and rubber tire.

The whole thing broke loose and once it started moving it was easy.

To remove your puller cut the round stock or flat bar on one side and then just rock the pieces back and forth to break the welds. Grind the welds back smooth.

Repeat for the other side. Before you put the wheels back on the axle shaft sand the shaft and the inside bore of the wheel hub. Then apply some sort of anti seize. I use a special grease called NO-OX-ID. It is GOOD stuff.
 

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An easier method would be to get the largest bolt that will fit into the ID of the rim. Get a matching nut and WELD the nut to the rim. Then just turn the nut in and it will push the shaft out. When done just leave the bolt on and paint it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
That might work but finding a bolt with that much thread might be a challange. If you try it use a bolt with fine threads. As I mentioned a two ton bottle jack would not budge it I had go to to a six ton (the store I was at did not have a 4 ton).

Such drastic measures might not be necessary for most tillers but my tiller is 28 years old and the wheels had never been off.

At any rate aside from having to have access to a welding machine and someone with at least average welding skills it will get the job done without having to buy new wheels or destroying other parts.
 
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