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How to keep my trailer tongue from lifting the truck when I back down the ramp?

2792 Views 40 Replies 24 Participants Last post by  JB_4x4
I have a good size dual axle trailer for my tractor. When I back down the ramp it really lifts the back of the truck a lot, putting loads of stress on the tongue and hitch etc. Are there any aftermarket solutions to support the back of the trailer from teeter tottering the tongue up?
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From Dave55; "The probably best option would be a trailer tongue jack installed on both sides of the trailer at the rear to support the rear of the trailer as you drive on and off the trailer if the ramps with the supports welded on will not work for you."

I like this idea! You can even out the rear on somewhat uneven ground, and just crank them out of the way when not in use. I rented a JLG towable boom lift that had a manual jack stand that not only retracted as expected but also swung up and parallel to the machine's frame so it was completely out of the way when not in use. A couple of those on the trailer would really do the job of support nicely.
Around here with all the hills and dips, it needs to be just like the tongue jack. crank it down, pull the pin and swivel the jack up or remove it. Just cranking it all the way up and driving, it won't be there long before it gets torn off.
100 feet from the end of my driveway at the street intersection, any trailer that has a deck between the tires, the trailer frame will be dragging the blacktop as you go through the intersection. Any jack hanging down will be removed before you get through the intersection. You should hear UPS, FedEx, U Haul, Ryder and many other vehicles go across that intersection.
My street has ten speed bumps and a lot of trailers scrape the bump.
Thats what someone asked for. Some people a just plain sick.
My street has ten speed bumps and a lot of trailers scrape the bump.
But then how fast would people drive if not for the speed bumps.
They are not there because everyone was driving 20 MPH.
It only takes two or three people to mess it up for everyone.
Modern life.
The speed limit is 25mph except when you go over a speed bump its 15mph. Sometimes the police enforce it. I've seen a bmw go over one so fast they flipped their car.
I need to charge extra in those neighbor hoods. Just for the time it takes to put tools back in place and the added travel time. Also, for vehicle abuse.
I just happen to live on a private road with a 15-mph speed limit. It's gravel to boot. If the dust flies you're going too fast. I have no problem with speed limits. But some communities take things too far.
But then how fast would people drive if not for the speed bumps.
They are not there because everyone was driving 20 MPH.
It only takes two or three people to mess it up for everyone.
Modern life.
With a truck load of tools 15 is still too fast. I feel for those needing an ambulance trip or for those with a house on fire. They would be the last street I would touch with a snowplow. But still they exist.
The speed limit is 25mph except when you go over a speed bump its 15mph. Sometimes the police enforce it. I've seen a bmw go over one so fast they flipped their car.
The crosswalks are on the speed bumps. So, I guess its to make people slow down at the crosswalks. There is a speed camera further down the street.
On a smaller trailer I use to haul my 2038 on I welded swivel mounted jacks to both sides on the rear... see pic, they can be removed for storage or just rotated up for transport.
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Guess you know now that putting blocking of some sort under the trailer rear is needed. The danger when doing it your way, is the parking brake only stops the rear wheels of the truck thus allowing it to start sliding along with your trailer. Not pretty, and know of a fellow killed when caught under that sliding two-some.
I have a good size dual axle trailer for my tractor. When I back down the ramp it really lifts the back of the truck a lot, putting loads of stress on the tongue and hitch etc. Are there any aftermarket solutions to support the back of the trailer from teeter tottering the tongue up?
use a bottle, crank or farm jack to hold up the rear of the trailer when backing off or loading
I know someone that just used 4 wheel drive locked in and did not worry about the rear wheels lifted.
That worked great till one time when the weight came off the rear truck tires and the truck moved sideways resulting in a jack knife situation. The jack knife situation ended with a messed up bed side on his pickup.
Right after that the next time I saw him load something, chocks in front and back of the trailer wheels, blocking under the rear of the trailer, truck still locked in 4x4. I guess the couple thousand dollars to repair the truck bed damage drove the message home about blocking the trailer rear up to stop that from ever happening again was cheap insurance.

As I said above, granted it was much larger machinery being loaded, I have seen the rear axles of a tractor trailer raised off the ground while loading/unloading equipment. So under the right circumstances you can pick up a rather large truck loading/unloading equipment.

We had a 25 ton lowboy trailer that did not have maxi spring brakes on the trailer. Every time we loaded or unloaded equipment someone had to sit in the tractor and hold the service brakes. It did not pick the truck up, but it did take enough weight off the back of the tractor that it would slide the rear tires on blacktop. Really not good when you have 45 or 50 tons going where gravity wanted it go.
It's not that hard to install a switch to lock electric trailer brakes. The trailer lift issue still needs to be addressed.
block up the rear frame as you back down, the blocks take the weight instead of the trailer transfer to the hitch.
I used to haul farm machinery with a three axle trailer that used a pivoting stand under the back of the trailer. The only issue with them was if the trailer was not blocked the stands would fold either back or front. The best and easiest was to block the trailer under the frame and block the wheels. Even later when the boss bought a special combine trailers we just locked the brakes (air) and left the trailer tongue do what it wanted to.
The problem I see with a permanent or removeable jack that is pinned to the trailer is if forgotten or if the trailer moves they can be bent or the mount destroyed. How do I know? Well have seen many of those jacks the farmers forgot to raise or remove from the tongue.
I had the same situation. I got 2 Bulldog jacks on the back corners of the trailer. The mounting bosses for them are welded on the trailer frame. They come cross-drilled so you can pin them in vertical or horizontal configuration and then wind them down to contact the ground. When I get back home and put things away, I remove the jacks and put them in the trailer tongue box where I keep all my straps, chains, etc.... This works like a charm. Good luck!
I have a good size dual axle trailer for my tractor. When I back down the ramp it really lifts the back of the truck a lot, putting loads of stress on the tongue and hitch etc. Are there any aftermarket solutions to support the back of the trailer from teeter tottering the tongue up?
It might be a pain to do this but it will work every time. Carry a wood log cut just right height and sat it under the back of trailer frame. Jack stands will work also.😀
I have a good size dual axle trailer for my tractor. When I back down the ramp it really lifts the back of the truck a lot, putting loads of stress on the tongue and hitch etc. Are there any aftermarket solutions to support the back of the trailer from teeter tottering the tongue up?
I just moved a 1951 Ferguson TO 30 an hour an a half all highway...when we loaded the tractor on the trailer, we used two jack stands at either side of the rear trailer frame and that kept the trailer level as we drive the tractor up the ramp. Worked perfectly and an inexpensive solution to a common loading problem...give it a try!
Lock the brakes on the trailer and let it raise the tongue. When loading/unloading make sure to be lined up and in low gear for the direction, have the engine set at the proper RPM required to make the load and don't clutch while on the incline.
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