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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a good size dual axle trailer for my tractor. When I back down the ramp it really lifts the back of the truck a lot, putting loads of stress on the tongue and hitch etc. Are there any aftermarket solutions to support the back of the trailer from teeter tottering the tongue up?
 

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There are ramps designed to support the rear of the trailer as the load gets onto the ramp. Here is a small version, but big ones are around for heavy equipment. I've seen after market supports too. You could also fabricate your own "ramp legs"
Road surface Asphalt Wood Automotive tire Rectangle
 

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My brothers neighbor has an equipment trailer that has feet that drop down and get pinned to support the back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
There are ramps designed to support the rear of the trailer as the load gets onto the ramp. Here is a small version, but big ones are around for heavy equipment. I've seen after market supports too. You could also fabricate your own "ramp legs"
View attachment 2561859
I like those and am familiar, they just wont work for my equipment
 

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You could carry some blocking to to put under the rear of the trailer frame to support it as you drive off.
That is usually not ideal, depending on the ground you are parked on, the blocks may or may not go under the frame.
The probably best option would be a trailer tongue jack installed on both sides of the trailer at the rear to support the rear of the trailer as you drive on and off the trailer if the ramps with the supports welded on will not work for you.
The ramps with the support legs can also be a pain if you are on uneven ground, sometimes I have had to push the ramps down with the bucket to get the ramps down or when you load the machine you can not pick the ramps up till you move the trailer forward a couple feet.

It is a real issue, I have seen the rear wheels of the truck picked completely off the ground and watched as the operator froze up and stopped the machine while the rear wheels were off the ground because the truck and trailer were running off. When it starts to move you have two choices that have a much better outcome than stopping, either get the machine on or off the trailer. And this is not just a pickup issue, I have seen the drive wheels on a tractor trailer lifted off the ground as well. It all depends on how long the overhang behind the axles is, how high off the ground the overhang is and how heavy the machine you are loading/unloading is.
Here in WVa, nothing is flat. Having the tow vehicle drive wheels off the ground on a slope usually has a bad outcome for something besides your under shorts.
 

· Kioti SCUT
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I don't know of any devices, but you could put weights, timbers, sand bags, etc. on the trailer tongue while backing down the ramp. Cal
 

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You could carry some blocking to to put under the rear of the trailer frame to support it as you drive off.
That is usually not ideal, depending on the ground you are parked on, the blocks may or may not go under the frame.
The probably best option would be a trailer tongue jack installed on both sides of the trailer at the rear to support the rear of the trailer as you drive on and off the trailer if the ramps with the supports welded on will not work for you.
The ramps with the support legs can also be a pain if you are on uneven ground, sometimes I have had to push the ramps down with the bucket to get the ramps down or when you load the machine you can not pick the ramps up till you move the trailer forward a couple feet.

It is a real issue, I have seen the rear wheels of the truck picked completely off the ground and watched as the operator froze up and stopped the machine while the rear wheels were off the ground because the truck and trailer were running off. When it starts to move you have two choices that have a much better outcome than stopping, either get the machine on or off the trailer. And this is not just a pickup issue, I have seen the drive wheels on a tractor trailer lifted off the ground as well. It all depends on how long the overhang behind the axles is, how high off the ground the overhang is and how heavy the machine you are loading/unloading is.
Here in WVa, nothing is flat. Having the tow vehicle drive wheels off the ground on a slope usually has a bad outcome for something besides your under shorts.
Block the trailer wheels and it will not run off.
 

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If you can have power to the trailer, you could add leveling jacks like a class A RV uses. They could be lowered to hold the back of the trailer up while backing the tractor off. Then raise the jacks if the trailer needs moved. I suspect you have the same issue loading the tractor too.
 

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If you usually unload the trailer on relatively level ground, this is what I'd do. Chainsaw a couple of logs into short pieces that will hold up the aft end of your trailer. Square them off (mostly to reduce weight) and cut them to give about 2" clearance when the trailer is loaded.

When you are ready to back the tractor off, simply put each log under a rear corner of the trailer, and slip a short piece of 2x4 on top. I did this once, using scrap blocks of wood I had in my garage - worked like a charm. This is nothing more than another take on @Dave55's comment on blocking. Cheaper than jack stands should you leave one behind.
 

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So post a picture of your trailer and tractor so we can see the problem.
Like mentioned above most good utility trailers have a brace welded to the ramps that is in contact with the ground when the ramps are down to prevent lifting the tow vehicle up while loading or unloading.
 

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Car haulers do. I'm talking utility here...
I welded a mount onto my utility trailer for the same purpose...

It amounts to what you want to spend, how much hassle you are willing to tolerate, and how often you load/unload heavy equipment.
You just need something to support the rear of the trailer. The thread has lots of suggestions, some work in a variety of conditions, others depend on being on flat level ground.
 

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How much weight are we talking for each the trailer, truck, and tractor?

As mentioned, jack stands are the easy portable and cheapest solution. Weld on trailer jacks are the best solution.
 
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