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Discussion Starter #1
Neither Search here, nor Google, nor YouTube are helping me here...

I may be overthinking this (as usual), but I need to replace the fuel lines on a Briggs 8HP engine, 192432-0189-01 970515YD (installed on my Trac Vac 880). There are some pretty tight turns, and these lines run pretty close to the muffler, so I'd prefer NOT to add fittings (potential leak points).

I've seen a few posts saying that fuel hose can be bent by putting a piece of coat hanger inside, bending to desired shape, and heating (in boiling water or with a heat gun).

Unfortunately, I've also read that this cannot be done, because it takes a special molding manufacturing process to form the desired shapes, and that can't be changed after the hose is made.

Briggs seems to love to make their engines with funky hose designs, I've seen it on their tractor engines too.

Have any of you done this successfully? If so, how???

Mike

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I have not seen replacement fuel line that was molded like is done for automotive cooling system hoses. Fuel line has reinforcement in the walls that should prevent kinking when bent to accommodate curves.
If you were bending metal line, there are spring like tools you can fit over the tubing to prevent kinking. An alternative is to fill the tubing with a non-compressible substance that will prevent collapse.
You should be able to use any good fuel line without problems.
tom
 

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Put copper wire in the hose. Bend a little more than you want to allow for recoil. Dunk in boiling water until completely heated. Dunk in cold water to set. Pull out wire. Voila, formed hose.

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys. I'm really only concerned about the 90 degree turns in the tight space behind / between the pump, carb and muffler.

Would a steel coat hanger work, or is it too rigid?

Mike
 

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Thanks guys. I'm really only concerned about the 90 degree turns in the tight space behind / between the pump, carb and muffler.

Would a steel coat hanger work, or is it too rigid?

Mike
It will but the copper is easier to get out
 

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Discussion Starter #6
OK, thanks.
 

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is that house wire gauge copper or heavier
Looks like #12....used for 20 amp circuits good trick Steve Urquell!
It probably is 12ga. I think I picked it up in the yard one day. Been using it a hangar for painting. That's why it's black. I'd say the closer to the ID of the hose the better to hold it open further.

Keep in mind you can straighten the hose/wire assembly after cooling to get the wire out and the hose will go back to the formed shape.
 

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You could also use steel or copper/nickel brake tubing to make the sharp bends and join it to the fittings with short straight pieces of hose..the copper/nickel stuff bends much easier without kinking..just avoid running metal lines close to heat sources like the muffler or it may cause the fuel to boil or vapor lock..
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I have a plastic measuring cup for that purpose, don't trust myself with glass in the garage (cement floor).

Robert, I thought about using a metal line, but was trying to avoid the extra connections. And, these lines are pretty close to the muffler (which I didn't know was a boiling risk), how close is too close?

Here's an outside-the-box idea that I just came up with: What if I put a piece of 3/16 NiCu line INSIDE of the hose (long enough to run the length of the bended areas, but short enough to be out of the way of the barbed connections).

The NiCu line would serve as a hollow spine, I could just bend the hose and it would retain its shape?

I doubt that the 3/16 size would cause too much fuel restriction, as these engines have carbs with much smaller orifices.

I have read online suggestions for putting springs inside of the hose, this really seems to me like it would work!

Mike
 

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I would think it would work,the metal line wouldn't offer much flow resistance,but it may clog easier if crud gets in the fuel..
I've run rubber fuel hose as close as 1/1'2" from a small engine muffler and it survived,you could put a sheet metal heat shield between the muffler and hose to reduce the amount of heat it would receive if needed too.
Usually the air flow from the blower housing helps cool the hose off too if it is run close to the block.

A stainless steel spring could be used inside the hose too I suppose--I wouldn't trust a steel or galvanized one not to rust up quickly ..
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Gotcha on the debris. As you can see in the pics above, there was no fuel filter. Not sure if there's a screen in the tank. I definitely plan to add one.

I happen to have some leftover NiCu line from a brake job on my RV a few years ago.

Mike
 

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my old 79 white by mtd 11hp briggs had the fuel line run around front of head from tank on right to carb on left. Rubber line ran inside a piece of copper pipe as muffler ran from left to right in same area.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
That's an interesting idea, just use copper elbows externally to form the corners!

Mike
 
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