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Discussion Starter #1
OK, the wife wants berry plants, raspberry, and blackberry. We bought about 20 plants late last summer and stuck them in the ground in two rows.

The seller said for best results to stake them.
I have no idea how to stake them.:dunno:

This is my attempt so far.



Am I heading in the right direction?

Any pics of your method of staking?

Is staking of berry's and annual support, or more permanent?

I was thinking of using aluminum fence wire if permanent is required.

I can switch to the baling twine I use for tomatoes if annual is the preferred method.

Thank you from a berry novice!!
 

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my grandparents have had raspberry's since I could remember and now my sister has the house and they never staked them. I have them too and never staked mine. I can give you a work of advice make sure to keep your rows wide cause they will fill in over the years and it makes them hard to get through to the center, my sister's are a real pain cause they filled in. mine I spaced them 6 feet between rows so I can run the mower through them.
 

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Since we have so much wind down here I used cedar post I took out of the vineyard. The tee posts will work fine, but I would put them about 20' apart. You can get tee post insulators and your choice of electric fence wire. I would use 14 gauge galvanized unless you want to spend the extra money for aluminum. The aluminum will stretch and might corrode more than galvanized. I have 14 gauge galvanized in the vineyard that is over 20 years old. It is rusty and is just now starting to break.
 

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I have about 6 rows of Rasberry and Blackberries and I don't reccomend your doing it the way I have.
Each row is about 30 ft long and I'm using the same steel posts you are(They are too flexible). One on each end.
I use 12.5 guage Electric fence wire stretched between them.
1 12" above the ground, One about 18" above that and one at about 4 ft.
The wire is fine( I think RDR reccomended it) much cheaper than #9. The clamping pliers are kind of high, but I'm using the wire and clamps in the mini-orchard too so it's not too bad over the longhaul.
Eventually I think I'll set wooden posts angled back like is done in Vinyards.
But the steel posts need more in the run or replaced.

If you have a post for every plant you may only need to stretch wire?

I will try to get pictures tonight to give you some ideas.

The way my wife goes through berries it is worth it any way you cut it.
 

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The way my dad did his was to plant a wooden post at the front and back of the row. Then he took #9 wire and ran three rows of wire from one front post to the back. Streatched it real tight with a fence streatcher... At first the wooded fence post were tirght but over time he had to run braces so the fence post would not lean in from all the weight from the berries....
 

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Here is the picture I promised. these berries have been in for 3 springs.
I will need to prune them this spring. And I need to rework the trellis.
Pleas ignore the trash in the background! Some had to be moved so we can build the new fence on the north side. And since the county landfill is not open on SATURDAYS I have not taken a day off to go to the dump.
 

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Here is how I do mine. http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=223414 They are in the 4th post on my vineyard 2012 thread. I forgot to mention I use cedar posts about 20' apart. I've started putting tee posts if the wires sag. I used 1 wrap of wire around the tee post to hold the wire in place. I've used barbed wire clips but you have to have them loose so the wire can move when you tighten it each year.

Don't pay any attention to the row with 2 end posts. I just added a taller 1 and didn't take the other out yet. If you use tee posts on the end you can put a brace post on the inside pushing against the end tee post. You can see the brace posts I have in the vineyard. I don't need them on the berries.
 

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We did the stake routine. Then we tried wire between to big posts...Now we use cattle panels everywhere for something that needs to climb. They are a little expensive but work great and they do not rust. We use them in the garden too. Three metal stakes and a panel. They will last forever.
 

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I have never even heard of staking raspberries..

Raspberrys are a 'first/second year cane' plant. The first year, a shoot comes up and grows into a healthy 'green' cane throughout the year. The first year cane doesnt really yield heavy fruit. In the late fall, first year cane should be cut down to about 24" fron the ground.
The second year, the same cane turns a brown barky color and bears its heavy fruit. At the end of the year, 2nd year canes should be cut right off at ground level.
The following year starts a new cycle all over again.

One note. Some say cane cutting down/off time should be in the spring. I find it very difficult to differentiate between first and second year cane in the spring because the winter drains color from the first year cane and they all look alike.

Also any cutting should be done when a plant is least active. Cutting in late fall is that time. The 1st year cane is still brighter green, and 2nd year cane is easily distinguishable from first.
Do yourself a favor and skip the trellace/staking of raspberries. Let them grow, use organic fertilizer, cut in the fall, keep soil moist but insure good drainage, supplement with acidic organics like peat moss, and enjoy the fruit of your little labor.

Ps, my patch is at the foot of a shale hill. The soil is well supplemented, retains moisture, but drains well. My favorite raspberry is the everbearing heritage. Last year i was pickin raspberries well into december. They were smaller and tart by then but still delicious!
 

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Mine are Brazos blackberries not rasberries. Rasberries don't make it down here. If I didn't put posts and wires the berries lean out from the row and I can't mow. These berries get over 7' tall.

I use 14 gauge galvanized electric fence wire. It doesn't take that much to hold them up straight. The wire is to hold them up straight, not so much to support them. The wire doesn't have to be stretched that tight so the cedar post I use on the ends don't lean in that much after around 20 years.

If you go to the link to my berries and vineyard you will see the end posts in the vineyard have a brace post inside. They still have leaned in after 22 or more years. They were leaning out to start. If I had taken the time to put a 2' post in the ground about a foot and wired to the brace it would've stopped the brace from pushing in. I have a cedar post every third vine with a tee post at the vines between the cedar posts. Tee post alone don't support the vines enough and as the wind rocks the vines back and forth they will sink each year. I saw this on a friend's vineyard on the outside row that caught the wind the most.

He also have his end posts tipped out and a guy wire anchored in the ground. Then you can't mow close and one more thing to hit with the mower or tractor. I like the brace posts better.
 

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When I was a kid, my dad used to take me and my brothers down to S.E. Iowa where he grew up. They did a lot of Coal mining in that area up to about 60 yrs ago. The mining companies owned everything, The houses were small enough they could be set on railroad cars and moved to another location when the vein's ran out. Seems every home had a berry patch. But once they were unmanaged they became a knarly impassible mess. We picked a lot of berries but were scratched from head to foot negotiating that maze.

Staking and trellising berries is a way of managing them, so you can pick them and mow around them without getting all cut up. As I said earlier, my metal T posts are not doing the job and will be replaced with wood posts.

Topping them slows the growth of greenery and puts more energy into producing berries. I planted 4 new ones last weekend and have a couple more blueberries coming in the next week or so.
 

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When I said 7' tall that is after pruning them back. Most of them are cut back to 5'. The strongest ones are 6 and 7'.
 

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One patch that I saw when I was a kid had a post at each end of the row with piano wire strung at about 4'. A string was hung from the wire for each plant and the barbs on the stalks held onto the string for straight up growth. The rows were about 2' apart and there was no problem walking between them.

The stalks were self supporting. They only needed guidance!

That berry patch was well sheltered from the breeze with a tall hedge on the north and west sides and several large willows on the property.
 

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It looks like your berries are farther apart than they need to be. I don't remember how to tip in rasberries, but you could fill in between the with this method.

I agree with the comment about having them tied up to make it easier to get down the rows. The thorns on mine eat you up even with them tied up straight.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
It looks like your berries are farther apart than they need to be. I don't remember how to tip in rasberries, but you could fill in between the with this method.

I agree with the comment about having them tied up to make it easier to get down the rows. The thorns on mine eat you up even with them tied up straight.
We are planning on tip in propagating them. Some of the ones we planted last fall grew enough to touch the ground, and they rooted!! :bananapow

And about half of the plants we got are thorn-less!! :00000033:
 

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We are planning on tip in propagating them. Some of the ones we planted last fall grew enough to touch the ground, and they rooted!! :bananapow

And about half of the plants we got are thorn-less!! :00000033:
Yes That was my plan too and it is slowly working. I started 3 plants in each 30 ft row and am letting the runners spread out each direction and set new plants.
When the rows fill in I have plenty of room and have no problem at all with having to start (transplant)another 30 ft row of each variety.
 

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All this berry talk just got me thinking that I must get me a berry patch planted soon.
I would highly reccomend it if you have a little room to start a patch.
At $3.00 for a little package in the store, my wife was breaking me up buying berries to make pastries and sauces. And she makes some great vinegrettes using them in salads.

No reason to not be growing my own?

Yesterday it was too muddy to do much due to our snow storm last week.
So during the rain delay at Talledega I went out and pruned my berries.
Looks like there will be a very good crop this year.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Well, it has been 7 weeks since the first post, and that first pic.

Things are different !! WOOT!!



We have been using baling twine and the "T" posts.

We are starting to get stalks as big as your thumb!!



Since I have only ever seen wild berries, I have never seen stalks this big before. :dunno:
 
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