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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Viking LT that is a rebadged Murray that looks like this


I loose traction going up a 30° slope and if I go sideway across a lesser slope I will loose traction on the high side as my body weight shifts downhill.

I have tried letting the tires down but has not helped much - any other ideas?

David L
 

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I agree on the wheel weights and/or loaded tires. HDAP's would help too.
 

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Nuff said? Good traction tires and weight on the wheels. Either fluid filled tires or wheel weights or both. Since everyone always asks. No the AG tires don't tear up the grass. They do far less damage than spinning turf tires. Oh and the weight down low makes the tractor more stabile on hills. Just don't take that as a license for stupidity. It's still a mower on a hill.
You don't need a big tractor for good tires. I used to have a little Craftsman LT10 that I added ags and wheel weights to. It made a world of difference. often the small stuff needs more help than bigger GT's.
 

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Just be aware, any weight you add, is going to have a negative impact on the transmission if it's a lawn tractor. They are not designed to go up slopes and handle wheel weights or loaded tires.
 

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Technically loaded tires don't have near the effect on the trans as wheel weights. The weight is not static on the axles. The trans doesn't feel the starting and stopping loads the same way as wheel weights. This is because the fluid weight floats in the wheels for lack of a better desciption. It doesn't twist the axles starting and stopping because it is dynamic inside the tires.

LTs have much smaller wheels than GTs so the size of wheel weights tends to be smaller with less weight. Big difference between 35lbs on the axle per side and the 100lbs we often put on our GTs. 35lb weights shouldn't be a huge issue if used in a sane manner. These are normally listed as options by the manufacturer which puts them in the "approved for use" catagory. In my experience with big store tractors a little weight helping traction is less problem for the trans than the abuse of tire slippage. Just don't go overboard on the LT with weight.
 

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I've been eating more fish lately and gained about 12 pounds.
Your rear tires look to be 18" tall. Try www.cedarrapidstire.com. I got some 18" snow hog tires there and put them on my Toro 117 groundsmaster.
 

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Technically loaded tires don't have near the effect on the trans as wheel weights. The weight is not static on the axles. The trans doesn't feel the starting and stopping loads the same way as wheel weights. This is because the fluid weight floats in the wheels for lack of a better desciption. It doesn't twist the axles starting and stopping because it is dynamic inside the tires.

LTs have much smaller wheels than GTs so the size of wheel weights tends to be smaller with less weight. Big difference between 35lbs on the axle per side and the 100lbs we often put on our GTs. 35lb weights shouldn't be a huge issue if used in a sane manner. These are normally listed as options by the manufacturer which puts them in the "approved for use" catagory. In my experience with big store tractors a little weight helping traction is less problem for the trans than the abuse of tire slippage. Just don't go overboard on the LT with weight.
I believe the term you are looking for is "Unsprung" weight? I agree that loaded tires means the axle doesn't have to bear the load as it would if the weight was "hung" off the rim. But that doesn't change the fact that Lawn Tractor Transmissions are pretty much to spec as is, they are not made to go up hills and they are not designed to pull weight (other than the operator) so any additional load is going to wear the transmission out more rapidly.

If it's a geared transmission you may likely never see an issue, but if it's a hydro, sooner or later It'll puke.
 

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I have a Viking LT that is a rebadged Murray that looks like this
That is one sweet looking Murray, man I wish I had one like.....hey, wait a minute......................

Seriously though, if it is identical to mine it will have the much scorned TT k46, I have had no troubles with mine because my lawn is flat and I don't pull many loads, but from what I here they don't like to climb or pull. 30 deg. is a healthy grade.
 

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A cross-country runner would lose traction going up a 30 degree slope.
I would plant ground cover instead of mowing grass.
 

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A cross-country runner would lose traction going up a 30 degree slope.
I would plant ground cover instead of mowing grass.
No sweat, just make sure the front wheels are powered too! :trink40:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
A cross-country runner would lose traction going up a 30 degree slope.
I would plant ground cover instead of mowing grass.
I'm turning the area at the bottom of the slope into an orchard so I will be planting clover and lucerne(alfalpha) to feed the trees and on the slope I have sown a mix of annual and perennial flowering plants that attract 'good bugs' that will attack the pests that attack the fruit trees - that will solve the mowing issue but if I can negotiate the slope I can park the mower under the house and save having to build a shed for it elsewhere.
 

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I will be planting clover and lucerne(alfalpha) to feed the trees and on the slope I have sown a mix of annual and perennial flowering plants
Sounds pretty!

... if I can negotiate the slope I can park the mower under the house and save having to build a shed for it elsewhere.
Ah, now I understand. Ramps work for wheelchairs. The first floor of old barns had a built-up modest slope to the door.

Can you incorporate a low-angle earth berm into your landscaping? If water has to run under, an 8 inch diameter section of plastic corrugated pipe may work.
 

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30 degrees? That's not a hill. That's a cliff!

I'd also go with AG tires. If you are able to navigate this hill now, AG tires will make it a lot easier. Aggressive tires all around are what you're looking for, even on the steers.

With a hill that steep, I think I'd be backing up that hill rather drive forward, and risk your tractor doing a backflip...with you on it.

Bob
 

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I always suggest adding fluid first, and tires next. However, that is a steep hill and you may want to go with AG and fluid off the bat. I also agree with the suggestion of backing up the hill, very good advice! With loaded tires, I would not add wheel weights to that tractor though. That would be too much stress with the hill you mention.
 
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