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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Maybe this thread should be "Trailering for Dummies". I will be picking up my new-to-me Kubota w/FEL tomorrow. I have a 16' tandem axle trailer, a Ford F250, and ramps. What I don't have is any idea how to properly tie the tractor down for transport. I did find this thread:
http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=102275, which was helpful, but really, I could use some pictures. How do you folks tie down your tractors for transport? I'm thinking chains w/binders, but where do they go? Diagrams or pics would help enhance my feeble visualization skills.

Thanks!
 

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I dont think I have trailered a Kabota but I have hauled alot of yard tractors. I usually use 22k straps . 1 pulling forward(front axle) 1 pulling back(off the drawbar) and one over the center in front of the seat. Works fer me AINT LOST ONE YET
 

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Use chains not straps on a CUT or larger, straps can and will break in an emergency situation. Under enough inertia, any method may fail, but you will see better results from 70 proof chains & ratchet binders.
 

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I have a Kubota BX2350 with FEL. One chain goes in front, over the FEL mounts and across under the frame (MMM off). Put tractor in low, lightly set brake, then reverse backwards against front chain to tighten it. Set parking break firmly to hold the chain tension (I also engage 4WD for extra brake holding). The second chain goes through two clevises I put in the two holes in the frame just above the 3PH. This chain I tighten with a chain binder.
 

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I have a Kubota BX2350 with FEL. One chain goes in front, over the FEL mounts and across under the frame (MMM off). Put tractor in low, lightly set brake, then reverse backwards against front chain to tighten it. Set parking break firmly to hold the chain tension (I also engage 4WD for extra brake holding). The second chain goes through two clevises I put in the two holes in the frame just above the 3PH. This chain I tighten with a chain binder.
In some parts of the country thats still not a secure load if your over 5000 lbs.. Needs to be a cross pattern to keep the load from swaying.. If you ever have to avoid something running out in front of you..


I use straps, the 20000 lb ones IF there are no sharp edges, after five miles stop and check tension. If I'm unsure of load i will use sched 70 chain. making sure to cross the chains at the rear of load at least.
 

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All good advice--anything over a GT--I personally would use 3/8" or larger chain--at least GR70...X- them at both ends.....(left side of tractor to right hold down etc.)--but don't let them 'rub' on each other...and use ratchet binders (IMHO)--
I like the binders all on the left side--so I can see them in the rear view mirror..:trink39:

Stop and check at five miles and AGAIN at 20 miles, then every 100 miles--if going long ways...

This might seem like a lot of money to spend--but if you plan on trailering anything much--it's cheap insurance---Ever have anything come loose???
I was in the Towing/Recovery Business for 30+years, and saw a lot of 'bad set-ups".....Some downright scary.....:Stop: some just pitiful.. I always see parts of ratchet straps , etc. around here lying on the roadways--where they have broken....

glenn
 

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I have hauled my 4200 lb Case (with FEL) 800 miles at a time on my 16' tandem axle trailer with the following equipment:

Four 5/16" X 15' (10' would be plenty but the extra length makes the chains more useful in general) grade 70 chains (grab hooks on each end) and four binders.

I put one chain on each side of the front and rear tractor axles and secure them to the trailer and tighten with the binder. The 2 chains on each end of the tractor cross over each other before securing to the trailer ( this keeps the tractor from any side-to-side movement).

Because I take no chances, I wire my binders in the closed position.

I've had Highway Police in 4 states inspect my load/method; never a problem

Nylon straps may develop cuts which cause them to fail when you least expect it.
 

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Four 5/16" X 15' (10' would be plenty but the extra length makes the chains more useful in general) grade 70 chains (grab hooks on each end) and four binders.

I put one chain on each side of the front and rear tractor axles and secure them to the trailer and tighten with the binder. The 2 chains on each end of the tractor cross over each other before securing to the trailer ( this keeps the tractor from any side-to-side movement).

QUOTE]

This is best. If one binder failed, you still have one chain holding it in place
 

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when hauling a normal lawn tractor i use 2 inch straps to tie it down...If am hauling a big tractor on my flat deck ..I use chains with load binders ..I also have my winch hooked to the front
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well, I got it home this evening. Had a bit of trouble with the trailer; this one doesn't have stake pockets so I had to hook the chains around the uprights between the deck and the rails. Used 5/16" grade 70 chain and ratcheting binders (4 of 'em). It's only the hottest freaking day of the entire year (so far), and I thought I was gonna pass out wrestling with those chains. Made everything tight and eased on home. I did have to stop before we got out of the driveway, and strap down the seat (doh!) I've got to come up with a system that works. I'm pretty sure my method was questionable, at best.

Thanks for all the replies! Your help was much appreciated.
 
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