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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys, looking for a new log splitter, but have no idea what size to get. Just bought a house basically built around a wood burning stove and will be attempting to do a majority of the heating with it during the winter. I have used a 3pt log splitter, but now i need one and don't know what size to get. Will a low 20's ton suffice, must i go to a low 30's ton? Does motor size motor as well? Honda, Briggs seem to be the most popular out there. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thats actually one i was looking at online. I don't think I would be doing anywhere that much wood, probably 5 cords/year absolute max. My question is, will a 20 ton basically split anything within reason?
 

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thats actually one i was looking at online. I don't think I would be doing anywhere that much wood, probably 5 cords/year absolute max. My question is, will a 20 ton basically split anything within reason?
I would think so .. as long as its not sweet gum .. or twisted, knotted hardwood.

I have a 20 ton or better splitter (Not Sure of tonnage) that goes through just about ANYTHING .. depending on how its loaded
 

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While it will slow down in stringy wood like some Elm can be, I haven't come across anything yet that it couldn't split.
 

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Simple answer is a 20 ton will work, but a 27 ton will work better.

You may want to consider the cycle time and the vertical/horizontal option (not knowing what kind of free wood that you may get) as well as the axle and wheel bearings if your going to do a lot of highway towing. And can you add a 4-way head, or are you limited to a single split per stroke? Time may be a limiting factor.

You can get one to suit just about any need, but it helps a lot if you can define what the needs are so that you get one that works best for you.

At some point in the equation is cost, initial and operational.
Do you have ready access to relatively free wood? Or will you have to buy it?
Do you already have the saw or more than one saw to support your needs?
Do you know the age and condition of the stove/furnace that you'll be using?
How many years of use will you get out of the stove/furnace before replacement or significant repair costs are needed?

See where I'm going with these questions?

Not trying to talk you out of it, just give it some thought and you may be better off buying the wood cut split and delivered. Only you can make that call.

Best of luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys, excellent points......i do have access to wood, I have def. determined that i need a log splitter, 80% because i really do, 20% because i think they are really cool....i think i am going to look in the 27ton range....which i assume i should be able to put a 4-way head on...thanks again
 

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I Love All Color Tractors
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My splitter is also a 20 ton MTD with a 6 hp Briggs. I haven't had any problems with it at all.

The easiest way to work with the biggest stuff, and the stringy stuff too, is to look for and use the natural cracks that appear in the blocks as the wood dries out.

If you don't see any cracks, start by taking off a little slab at the edge and then just turn the block and continue doing so until you have it worked up. It takes a little bit of effort, but it works great.

One's first thought is to split a big round directly in two to make it easier to work with. Think of the above as "whittling" away a block of wood. Picture sharpening a pencil with a knife and use the same procedure.

The really big splitters use more fuel too. How much, I don't know.
 

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Check this thread Post # 51 .. there are two photos of my log splitter

http://mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=71325&page=2

I bought it 8 years ago used .. Its powered by an 8 HP Kohler K181 motor.

This splitter is well built .. and has never given me trouble .. besides the normal stuff .. points .. plug

The guy I bought it from .. was the original owner and bought it back in the early 70s Its a "Big Giant" brand .. which is not made anymore as far as I know.

Let us know what you decide to buy ..and good-luck
 

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Not trying to talk you out of it, just give it some thought and you may be better off buying the wood cut split and delivered.
Ja, if you are buying most of your wood like I am, the option of buying it already cut/split/seasoned certainly could be a factor. In some regions, the price spread between C&S and logs is so small that it isn't worth the expense and mess in the yard to DIY.

When going with more tonnage, look at the specs of the pump. Tonnage is had by using a larger cylinder and a larger cylinder needs more GPM and larger motor to keep up the cycle time. More tons with fast cycle time means more cost. Since most of my wood splits real easy, cycle time is a big factor for me hence my short-stroke mod I linked to.

Four-way wedges work best on splitters with a fixed wedge and H/V convertible splitters don't have fixed wedges. On moving wedges, the horizontal wedge tends to drive some of the splits toward the beam and puts a sideways force on the sliding wedge. Four-ways also work best with a particular diameter log unless you get into the fancy models where you can raise/lower the wedge. With some of the larger rounds I split, a four-way would leave many splits too large and would require resplitting. With smaller rounds, it would split off centre and tend to chip off wedge-shaped pieces.

Fixed wedge splitters should have an out-feed table so you don't have to pick the oversized splits up off the ground to resplit. Even at that, you have to reach farther to bring the splits back to the beam since they are pushed away from your operating position. If you split a lot of small stuff, the fixed wedge is nice cuz you don't need to toss the splits out of your way. The ram will push the pile and you can move the splitter forward. My neighbor keeps his hitched to the tractor left in neutral and the ram rolls the tractor forward as the pile builds up. I have the moving wedge and need to toss the splits.

 

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...start by taking off a little slab at the edge and then just turn the block and continue...
Some species of wood will chip off wedge shaped pieces if you try that. Birch is bad for that, leaving wedge shaped pieces that don't stack well. Sometimes they even blow out the side rather than split all the way through. I almost always try to split close to centre and then resplit the half. It's the same when making kindling with a hatchet, consecutively halving the halves.
 

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I have the moving wedge and need to toss the splits.
Two schools of thought on this. I like to park close to the rounds and toss the splits over to where I will be piling or stacking them. Rounds being heavier, I don't want to have to carry far and splits are light enough to toss. My neighbor doesn't toss his splits but he has to carry his rounds farther.
 

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Some species of wood will chip off wedge shaped pieces if you try that. Birch is bad for that, leaving wedge shaped pieces that don't stack well. Sometimes they even blow out the side rather than split all the way through. I almost always try to split close to centre and then resplit the half. It's the same when making kindling with a hatchet, consecutively halving the halves.
LL .. you have the neatest & nicest stacked wood that I have EVER seen :fing32:
 

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LL .. you have the neatest & nicest stacked wood that I have EVER seen :fing32:
I hope you're not being facetious and commenting on the above pic cuz that ramshackle stack next to the splitter gets restacked. Here are a couple more pics.

This is the start of a temporary stack that will over-Winter where it is as it won't all fit in the shed.


This is another temporary pile that will over-Summer here and eventaully be moved to the shed.


This is the last stage in the shed. Note that it is stacked 9 feet high onto a concrete slab.
 

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Nice wood shed.
Still, a wood splitter and an umbrella to keep the sun off you does kind of do something to the image of the Canadian lumberjack. You do own a red flannel shirt, don't you?
 

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wow now that's a nice stack of wood.

I wish my stacks looked as nice as the "temporary stacks"
 

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I hope you're not being facetious and commenting on the above pic cuz that ramshackle stack next to the splitter gets restacked. Here are a couple more pics.

This is the start of a temporary stack that will over-Winter where it is as it won't all fit in the shed.


This is another temporary pile that will over-Summer here and eventaully be moved to the shed.


This is the last stage in the shed. Note that it is stacked 9 feet high onto a concrete slab.
I was not talking about the photo of the pile near your splitter .. I have seen your other wood pile photos .. I WISH I could get mine as nice and neat as your's :fing20:
 
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