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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have a question about the water pressure on our hot water supply lines. Up until about 2 mos. ago, we pretty much had equal pressure on the hot and cold side. Then, all of a sudden, the hot side slowed down noticeably. I shut the supply off to the house and opened the hot water faucets at the far end of the house. That seemed to help a bit, but still seems to be about 1/2 the volume of the cold side. Now, I realize something must be blocking or restricting the flow but wonder what might be the best way to try to fix that issue. I thought about shutting off the water into the house again, and open a pipe as near as I can get to the hot water heater and open the faucets and with my shop-vac try to pull any restriction back out of the line. I am thinking a piece of lime buildup may have broken loose and that's what is restricting the flow.

We have a fairly new home (18 years, copper pipes), newer water heater (1.5 years), and no other installs or work done on the water lines in the house for the past few years.

Any thoughts?
 

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I just repaced my HW heater 2 weeks ago and could not believe the *crp* in the inlet and outlet fittings even with a whole house cartridge type water filter on the inlet side "just" before it goes into the HW heater inlet, an attempt on my part the last time that I put a HW tank in this house to prevent the tank from loading up with sediment so badly.... all my piping is 1/2" copper the replaced HW tank was ~10 years old and has been pulled out and reinstalled a few times for access to my A/C coil at the bottom of my furnace, and i know for sure that last time (2 years ago) that I pulled and re installed that old HW tank that it was not this way;
I do notice with the new HW tank and those inlet/outlet fittings freshly cleaned out it does seem I have more pressure than before with the old tank....
 

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close enuff works for me
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I have run into this problem on several heaters. There are baffles built into the nipples that come out of the top of the water heater..You will have to turn off the water ,drain the preasure off,and cut the pipe off ,it is usually the hot side , unscrew the nipple and clear the obstruction. There are compression style couplings that you can use to put the pipes back together without soldering.
 

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just noticed something; Ladd IL; I was thru there 2 months ago, bought an aluminum cap for my Dakota from a guy in the next town over (Dover) I've been past there on 80 several times and never really "thought" anything of it....
I really didn't want alum (would rather have had 'glass) but for $50 I wasn't complaining; (it did cost me $~20 in gas to go get it.......) it will probably only be on the bed of my truck during the "cold/potentially snowy" months anyway
 

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Just a quick lesson on scale (mineral deposits)

Calcium carbonate is the typical scale you will find in household water lines. Filtering won't remove the ions from the water that create this scale. When the ion-laden water is heated, the calcium carbonate becomes less soluble and precipitates out as white solids (you will often see the crusty white buildup on the hot side and not the cold if you inspect the water heater inlet/outlet). Pressure changes within the water heater also accelerate the formation of calcium carbonate.

Really no good way to remove the scale once it has formed aside from an acid job which would solvate the scale.

To prevent this problem, a water softener is in order...
 

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I have run into this problem on several heaters. There are baffles built into the nipples that come out of the top of the water heater..You will have to turn off the water ,drain the preasure off,and cut the pipe off ,it is usually the hot side , unscrew the nipple and clear the obstruction. There are compression style couplings that you can use to put the pipes back together without soldering.
We had the low olmost no flow of hot water at the shop. Found a plastic check ball I forget if it was the inlet or outlet side that was melted/distorted. I think it was when some one turned the water off without turning the elect off & caused the tank to overheat. I just cut the top of the plastic valve assy out & removed the ball. now we got great flow once again.
 

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Just a quick lesson on scale (mineral deposits)

Calcium carbonate is the typical scale you will find in household water lines. Filtering won't remove the ions from the water that create this scale. When the ion-laden water is heated, the calcium carbonate becomes less soluble and precipitates out as white solids (you will often see the crusty white buildup on the hot side and not the cold if you inspect the water heater inlet/outlet). Pressure changes within the water heater also accelerate the formation of calcium carbonate.

Really no good way to remove the scale once it has formed aside from an acid job which would solvate the scale.

To prevent this problem, a water softener is in order...
no, strangely my obstructions looked more like iron, rust chunks.
 

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When our well pump croaked about a month ago,and replaced,when they yanked the dead one up out of the well,it was covered in thick slimy red iron deposits,that looked like that old red lead primer paint!..here there is tons of iron in the ground,and our town boasts of having the first successful iron forge in the USA,I guess all they had to do was dig some up out of the ground and build a forge!..

The plumber had to run a garden hose outside from the pump's outlet where it joined the pressure tank,and let it run a few hours,at first the red muck that came out was incredible..it took a good week before we could use the water in the house,as rust kept coming out seemingly forever...I can only imagine how much of it is inside me ,after drinking it for 30+ years!.:eek:...and how clogged up some of the plumbing must be in the house too(the washing machine in particular!).....been thinking about putting a water filter at least on the kitchen faucet so we can use it for drinking and cooking...kind of late to do it right at the pump,seeing the pipes have had 35 years to clog up with iron and calcium already..
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, went down and turned the water to the house off and drained a bit out of the heater. Turned the gas off, too. Took the hot water outlet tube off (stainless steel flexible, about 14" long). The end was totally blocked with rust. I cleaned it out and broke off a lot of rush chunks. When I put everything back together and turned the water on the difference was amazing. Plenty of water pressure, both hot and cold now. Thanks for all the input.
 
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