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Discussion Starter #1
at our hunt camp in northern Ontario,we hve about two miles of trails we try to keep from growing in.getting older sucks and a brush saw kinda hurts me now.was wondering if anyone here has constructed a homemade tree cutter or mulcher?the trees and brush were dealing with now are in the 4"to 6" diameter range.was looking at renting a bobcat with the foresty attachment but it was way to pricey for a week.

cheers:tango_face_glasses:
 

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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Here is one alternative:

Host a three-day event with plenty of great food and refreshing cold adult beverages. Ask folks to come prepared with proper saws and pole saws and ATV and a commitment of a couple hours each day at the camp. I'd bet you could coax a half-dozen or so folks who would love the fresh air, and chance to wield OPE for a good cause.

Good luck, a little too far for me, but just the thought makes me thirsty
 

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Discussion Starter #4
jere39 your idea is about the best option,tractor holic I would like to try that cutter.not sure how well it would work in tight quarters though.wonder if anyone on the site has one????

cheers
 

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In tight quarters, you probably are looking at damaging the quad and/or yourself. The unit depends on speed/momentum to cut through the tree, so if it's in the middle of other tree's,you either have to/risk hitting the tree's surrounding it to cut it down.

Personally, I would rig up a way to mount a chainsaw out front, with a way to throttle up while being seated...
 

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Graveley beat you too it!...too bad the saw cant be rotated 90 degrees so you can cut saplings sitting down..

I'd like to have one of those front mounted chain saws,I'm finding just standing up using a chain saw very fatiguing lately...luckey to cut 3 trees up before I have to sit and get my breath back and let my back stop killing me..
THIS attachment looks extremely dangerous!..one slip on that snow and ZING,your missing a leg,arm,or are in two pieces ! :eek:
 

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Innisfil? Northern Ontario???? Only if you live in Toronto! Ottawa is further north.

Note that any brush cutter with enough juice to go through a 6" tree requires operator protection well beyond that of wearing apparel. A fully caged cab with polycarbonate shields would not be amiss.

A 2" tree of the species common to Ontario can easily be 12' tall, 4" can be more than 16' tall, and 6" can exceed 20' tall. The operator will want at least a hard hat if using that ATV brush cutter.

Google images of brush cutters.

Bite the bullet and get the Bobcat. Two miles of trail is more than 4 or 5 guys can clear in a weekend with saws and axes, or anything else in the average guy's tool collection.

As an option, check with the forestry companies. They may have the equipment (and operator) available, or they may have suggestions for the specific equipment needed for your project. Remember, the slash also has to be dealt with.

This is not a project that you want to play with all summer. The earlier that you can get it done, the better.

 

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The ATV will only work in a nice clear field, and those bushes were only a couple on inces at the stem.
Those Gravely gizmos are wonderful and terrifying; the hydraulic chainsaw could be fabricated and added to whatever machine you like, and made to work horizontal.
But in reality things aren't as neat and tidy as the smooth yard areas in the videos.
Sometimes you need to notch to avoid the blade getting pinched, or you need to squeeze around behind. And as stated above, you'll still need to deal with the fallen wood.

I think you need a tractor, Bobcat, or whatever with a hard core brush cutter, and you have to go through often enough that nothing has time to grow beyond it's ability.

4-6" ?? that takes years to grow. How often do you go up there?

Of course it would be fun to design and build something amazing, and it could be done. But not as simple as those old gravelys You'd need tracks, guards, a big clamp for the stem, a hydraulic arm to lift and move it. In other words, a forestry machine.

A crawler with a front blade, or mini dozer, would push them down and shove them to the side. It would be a bit messy, but very satisfying. A crawler could be fitted with a brush cutter or stump grinder. and they're capable in hills.
 

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4-6" ?? that takes years to grow.
That depends on species and environment. Softwoods (balsam, spruce, and pine) can grow as much as 1/4" (6mm) in radius per year. Hardwoods (birch, maple, and beech) are considerably slower growing at 1/16" or less per year.

A 4" softwood tree may be as young as 8-12 years old. Clearing bush trails and power line right of ways is something that is only done at 10-15 year intervals. The trace of such endeavors can still be visible 30 or more years later if left to nature.

I have a maple in my back yard that was 15' tall and 2" in diameter when I moved in 45 years ago. It's now close to 30' tall and about 8-10" in diameter. I have another in the front yard that's considerably bigger that was only a 5' sapling in 1975.
 

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I worked on a Christmas tree farm in the '50's. We had two two-wheeled Gravely's that had four foot chainsaws that hung off the front sideways. When mounted with the bar horizontal we would just walk the rows and cut off the trees close to the ground. The bars could be positioned vertically so we could cut fire wood by pushing down on the handles, drive forward, stop and engage the saw and let the weight of the machine apply all the pressure. They were strong little workhorses.

~Lee
 

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Exactly my point! Passing through with a brush cutter once a year should do the job.
True. But this sounds like recreational property. The last thing that I would want to do is burn up a weekend or two every year busting my butt working on recreational land. I could stay at home and do work and have all of my tools on hand, not 100 kilometers away. Been there, done that. I don't do it any more.

There's a reason that I included the youtube video. If you've never lived in Ontario or Quebec, you won't have any concept of the full meaning because the video is insufficient to tell the whole story. It has to be experienced! The little buggers are relentless and active from early morning and into the evening hours when the mosquitos take over. They both draw blood. You really don't want to stir them up by cutting brush any more often than you have to.

However, there is a slight difference between the northern Ontario where I live, and the "northern" Ontario of the OP. There is a similar difference when you go 100 kilometers further north from my location.
 

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Well, it's a tradeoff. You either do it more frequently, and have to deal with smaller brush so the job goes faster, or you only do it every once in awhile, and it takes a lot longer and you need bigger equipment to do the job.
 

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I volunteer for trail maintenance in a number of parks in the area around here. I have an old ATV with a chainsaw scabbard and a rough duty cart I pull behind with a variety of tools, usually an axe, hatchet, cant hook, pry bar, shovel, pole saw, extra fuel, water, static line, come-along, chain. The ATV is rarely used to actually move anything other than the cart and tools. A two volunteer crew can cut back over reaching limbs, remove logs that have fallen across the trails, level wash-outs, and trim back any encroaching briars on several miles of trail a day. No doubt the OP's trails have over grown more than these hiking trails have, and going would be slower than my experience. But, I can't believe 6 guys working in 3 two man crews couldn't clear two miles in three days.

Think of it as your own little re-enactment of the building of the Al-Can highway.

Now, I admit I am not used to working in mass black-fly infested areas. I've canoed in the BWCA and Quetico Provincial park system. Choosing wisely to make my trips in May before the major hatches. I spend most every winter day in the woods here taking advantage of the snow pack for skidding logs, the temperatures for keeping the bugs we do have at bay, avoiding ticks, and generally working without sweating up an uncomfortable amount.

All that said, I am still not volunteering to join a crew, I just don't intend to drive that far to join the fun.
 
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