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Discussion Starter #1
Does Sears carry a hitch ball for an LT 1000? I just took one off my truck but the hole in the tongue is a hair too small. Seems silly that it wasn't made to accept a standard ball. kkri
 

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The bolts on hitch balls vary in size ,the heavy duty one can have a 1" thread , some are 3/4 and have seen cheap ones with 5/8 thread . Wouldn't want to tow any thing big with a cheap one , but would work on a garden tractor for light duty.:goodl:
 

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For a 5/8 go to TSC .
 

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I made the hole bigger on my craftsman. You can file the hole out, drill it bigger, or drive a rod through it.
 

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I just stripped an LT1000 down for parts. I would not tow very much at all with one after I see how light the frame is.
 

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I had a ball that the shank broke off of,so I drilled and tapped it for a 1/2" bolt..and put a thick flat plate under it to stiffen the tractor chassis up some..they are pretty wimpy on some models...you could weld a 1/2 and 5/8 or 3/4" bolt head to head and use that to bolt a ball on,if its the type with a threaded hole in it--or simply bolt a thick plate to the tractor hole that has a larger one for the trailer ball too..have to make some way to hold it from swiveling side to side though..
 

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First off, I think the original clevis draw plate is too low to the ground and too weak to support a ball. Don't forget that a ball adds a bending force because it is pulling from above.

I solved both problems by welding up a ball hitch and stiffening the clevis hitch.

 

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The bolts on hitch balls vary in size ,the heavy duty one can have a 1" thread , some are 3/4 and have seen cheap ones with 5/8 thread . Wouldn't want to tow any thing big with a cheap one , but would work on a garden tractor for light duty.:goodl:[/QUO


My recever has bushings and I have a hitch ball with 1 1/2 inch shank. The plate with the whole on your tractor is very thin. Be careful what you pull. A heavy trailer will bend your frame with ease.
 

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I picked up one of these a while back... http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/atv-3-way-hitch.aspx?a=386091

I had to make the hole on the back of the tractor larger so the bolt would fit, but it seems pretty sturdy. As others have mentioned, the weak link (on the LTs anyway) is that the flimsy plate will not support much tongue weight at all. My plan is to add a thick piece of steel (similar to the lower part of LLigetfa's set up) to stiffen everything up some. I realized in short order that the tongue weight of my log splitter would bend that plate down like it was foil.

Speaking of LLigetfa...don't I know you from the stove board???
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the input. I think I will drill it out and use the 3/4 inch shaft. Don't expect any heavy towing. Just moving my utility trailer. Could just as easily move it by hand.

kkri
 

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kkri,

If you enlargen the hole for the 3/4 or 1 inch bolt hitchball, be sure to add a couple of LARGE, THICK flat washers on the bottom and top of the drawbar. They have two functions, spacers because the balls are intended for a thicker towbar, and to move and increase the bending area on the drawbar away from the hole. Enlarging the hole weakens the drawbar. Even if you use the 5/8 inch hitchball you should add the washers. The biggest problem you're going to have is the bending action as you accelerate and decelerate what you're towing. The drawbar on the LTs are not made for that kind of bending stress and will crack at the hole and who knows where else.

LLigetfa has the right idea. His hitch assembly moves the stress point and spreads it out over a larger area. The height of the ball makes little difference other than for convenience. It does, however, move the ball farther away from the centerline of the axle (the fulcrum point) and increases the leverage the weight has so it tends to lift the tractor front end more if he tries to pull too large of a load. This tendancy can be remedied by limiting the weight towed or by adding counterbalancing weights to the front of the tractor.

Runningbare
 
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