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Discussion Starter #4
I have a 11HP B&S riding lawnmower (John Deere 111) that overheats immediately upon starting the engine. The longer it's run the hotter it get's. When I drain the oil it comes out jet black, extremely hot and looks like hot black water. It melts a plastic container as it drains out.
I was told that there is a "paddle" that throws the oil around to oil the engine that is located somewhere in the bottom of the engine.
Can someone give me an idea of how I can check out this "paddle" please. I have been on Google for hours trying to find a parts list that just might show this paddle with no success.
I have the engine ready to pull out of the tractor frame right now.

Many thanks for all the help,

Harold
 

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Murray tractor owner
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Clean the cooling fins, then change the oil using SAE 30 (detergent)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Fins cant get any cleaner and the oil has been changed at least 8 times in two days with the same results as mentioned above.

Harold
 

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Welcome Harold, might try the JD Parts Catalog, they have great parts and diagrams to check over. I actually looked for the "paddle" you mention, but don't see it in the one diagram of the engine I was checking. And I was looking under the 111, there is a model 111H also. You can select the model you have, then just go to the alphabetical index and E.

Best of luck in getting this issue resolved and hopefully some more guys in the know will be along, so keep checking in :fing32:.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Jim,

Right now I just trying to understand how these engines are lubricated. What moves the oil from the sump itself?

Harold
 

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It has a arm in side that splashes the oil around so dose the counter weights on your crank ...If its getting hot like that i would look at your head gasket and your exhaust if your fines are good and clean ...A partly plugged muffler would cause this so would a blown head gasket .....
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Now we're getting somewhere. It's too late to get at it this evening but tomorrow off comes the muffler and head.

Many thanks,

Harold
 

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Now we're getting somewhere. It's too late to get at it this evening but tomorrow off comes the muffler and head.

Many thanks,

Harold

i have seen the arm or paddle brake but not very often check the easy stuff first ...Look at the valves also when you have the head off ma...Can you post pics when you take it off
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Decided to go take a few pictures this evening and get a new page in my web site started. I'm going to restore this JD 111 over the winter months here in Florida. I'll be adding pictures as I go along. This engine does not have a oil dipstick. Wonder why.

Anyway here is 8/24/2010.....

http://www.members.cox.net/jaymom5/johndeere.html

NOTE: For those of you that know their HTML......my HTML is horrible and shamefully outdated. Please ignore it. It works in MS IE8 which is what I use.

Harold
 

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That engine still looks pretty dirty, JMO. When you pull the engine, take the tin off and hit the engine, tin, and the frame with Purple Power and pressure wash the tar out of it. Then move on to everything else. Plus, things are much nicer to work on when all nice and clean. Again, JMO.

Joe
 

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The experts on here won't give you the time of day until you do your own due diligence & provide them with the model, serial, & code numbers. They are professionals & make a living knowing these engines. The head gasket idea was probable until you provided pictures showing your engine to be a flat head, or 'L' head engine. When these 'blow', they don't dump combustion product into the crankcase, as do most of the overhead valve types. That means that there is little chance of a blown gasket causing the excessive heat condition. Internal combustion engines are NOT very efficient! Something on the order of 70% of the energy derived from burning the fuel is 'waste' which is either blown out the exhaust (most), or dissipated by the coolant (high air volume). While not pristine, your cooling fins look clean enough to preclude overheating; that just leaves the exhaust. On a car, I'd check for excessive exhaust back-pressure with a vacuum gauge; dropping the muffler is probably your easiest route. Given the age of the machine & your climate, I'm expecting a baffle in the muffler to be partially blocking your exhaust flow. I'm about 80% sure that this is where you'll find the problem (the other 20% covers space-aliens & assorted gremlins). Don't count yourself out of the woods yet though, this much overheat quite often loosens valve seats &/or guides & causes scoring of the cylinder bore. As far as the oil distribution goes, there are three primary methods. The most common in the lower end engines is a 'dipper' or slinger attached to the rod cap. The second & more problematic scheme is to use a rotary slinger (most often also functioning as a governor component). Lastly, the higher end engines have a proper oil pump, most with oil filters. I also noticed a free-floating spring in one of your pictures. Although it isn't of a size I associate with the governor setup, that portion of the engine is critical & can lead to a short life with a tragic end. In summation, why don't you post the relevant ID numbers to your engine & have a shot at getting a response from the professionals on here (there are at least three). I'm just a squirrel with a bit of experience & a poor memory. Good luck!
 

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Lean fuel mixture or a partially sheared flywheel key may also cause an engine to run hot.

Mike
 

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If the engine is running hot as quickly as you state then it has to be a plugged muffler or exhaust port. The "paddle" that you are referring to is actually called and OIL SLINGER and is NOT what is referenced above. If the oil slinger broke apart I would expect that the engine would have seized or broken a rod when being run. Although they don't ALL do it when lack of lubrication is present; it is pretty easy to hear the difference between an engine that isn't exhausting and an engine that is running with no lubrication.

Remove the muffler and BRIEFLY run to see if that fixes your problem, if not the engine has to come off and sump removed to check the oil slinger.

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #20
All I have is a 8X10 ft shed and it's been raining here in Florida for days now. I rebuilt a VW engine in this shed once so I honestly believe that I can rebuild a lawn mower engine in it too. I just need to see some sunshine first. Right now I have to find a service manual for this engine that I can download.
Many thanks for all the post, it's much appreciated.

Harold
 
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