My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
628 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
what do you think of these spindles ?


it was a pain in the *** to get to the bearing on this one spindle ... let alone taking the pulley off to get to the other one ... i dont know a good way..

should i be looking for a new deck or spindles or tools and bearings ?
id really like some ones with grease fittings to avoid all this in the future.
any ideas or places to get parts for this would help too

thanks !
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
490 Posts
The spindle looks pretty worn on the blade side , I just did mine on my 23 year odls Simplicity and they werent that bad although I did reuse them and they are just fine. Im assuming you are putting on new bearings? You might be able to flip the spindles over and put the pulley on the bad side It would cover the bad spot and still have plenty of teeth to work. Check on the Simplicity page , someone Might have a good used set. My Original bearings lasted 23years and Im bettin yours are 30 years old . New bearings should last a long time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,515 Posts
see if you can get the bearing number off the old bearing , any bearing supply house have them, there not spicial. make sure you get sheilded bearings. I hope you only pressed on the inside race of the bearing , when you put it on. pressing from the out sdie race will damage the bearing giveing short service life. some bearing are a bear to remove. Glad I have a lathe to make up mandrels to do that type of job.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
628 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
ok, this is my first time touching this , so i have no idea how the bearings were put on originally.

i had to beat the splined washer/blade back plate to get it off (keep in mind this is the one with GOOD spindle.
im not sure how im supposed to take the pulley off ? just put the other spindle end in a vice ?

all the bearings, blades turn by hand, im not sure if i need to be replacing all the bearings or what ... but last time i used the deck in higher grass ... it sounded like the belt was slipping(brand new belt) ... really dont know what to do
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,034 Posts
I check the bearings on my mowers by removeing the blades and belts then use a battery powered drill(with socket adopter) to spin the shaft while listening to it. I've got a stethascope like tool but you can use a screwdriver (against the spindle and your ear), you'll know if the bearings are good or bad. If you're haveing trouble with belt slippage, I'd doubt it's the spindles. Look at proper belt tension and that the belt is seating in the pulley correctly. There are different v angles on belts, make sure you've got the correct belt. As for removing and installing the bearings check with your local auto repair shop. They should have a press and probably the correct drivers for the bearings. I've done it for different people at my shop, telling them up front that I asume no responsabilty if something breaks. I usually don't even charge for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,515 Posts
If you have a asssortment of steel pipe laying around see if the spindle will fit inside the pipe and set against the inner bearing race , this will give even force to remove it and put the new one back on. With the old one sometimes I just pull it frome the outside race and if it breaks I use a die grinder to split the inside race and it is easyer to remove. A good soaking in light oil and desil fuel for a couple of days helps. Or as Butch said take it to your local shop and usaly they'll prass them off. My local bearing guy that I buy hundres of bearings from does this for me on ocasion. My machines at work have over 1000 bearings in them. I just replaced 760 in one machine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
773 Posts
I use a wire brush chucked into a drill to clean up the exposed area, then use a 3 jaw puller to remove the bearings after having soaked them in PBlaster or other penetrant. Once the bearing are removed I clean up the shaft on a wire wheel on my bench grinder.

The bearings are sealed bearings and should not require lubrication. Some will fill the arbor housings with grease upon ***'y to keep the rust down on the inside of the housings and spindle.

The groove in the end of the shaft pictured is not all wear as some might assume. There is a spring spacer that goes in there to center the blade during assembly. The splined washer then goes on followed by a bell shaped washer and bolt with lock washer. The bearings are not a press fit and if the shaft is cleaned properly, they should go on with very light pressure.

Having the right tools such as the 3 jaw puller, the proper driver to fit the inner portion of the bearing, and cleaning the surface properly will make this task much easier. The biggest culprit to bearing failure is blades that are not balanced.
 

Attachments

·
15,000 +posts!
Joined
·
20,421 Posts
Not balanced ,yes--but BENT is even worse!...bent blades or spindles wipe new bearings out quick,and old ones even quicker!..if your deck agitates like a washer machine on the spin dry cycle,its a good bet something is bent..
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top