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Discussion Starter #1
Hi

I painted the frame yesterday and it didn't go well. I was using the MF Flint Grey Mettalic in a 1 quart size. I primed the frame a couple weeks ago with tremclad grey and I rolled most of it on with a small roller.
My plan was to use a foam roller with the Flint grey. The paint was very thin and the roller produced a lot of bubbles which did not have time to dissipate before the paint began to thicken which was almost immediately. I abandoned the roller and tried a bristle brush which left a lot of streaks. I finally went to foam brushes which worked the best but did not leave a consistent finish where the lap marks are. This paint is rather different than any I have worked with in the past. Perhaps it is because of the high metallic content that it is so thin. It dried very fast. Very smelly. I wore a respirator.
I am looking for some suggestions on how to best apply a second coat. There were a few runs and sags as well to contend with.
I am thinking of going to a small conventional roller instead of foam and giving that a try on the underside of the chassis. The foam roller left a consistent color and texture to the finish , the problem being the bubbles. My thinking is that the short nap on the regular roller may be less likely to bubble. Any advice greatly appreciated. It sure is a nice color though. The finish is almost like a pearl effect.

Cheers
Brian
 

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Hey Brian,

Can you post a few pictures of what's happening and how it looks?

I believe you're fighting a battle of temperature (chemical), gravity and heavy metallic solids suspended in the brand's vehicle (mixing clear). Most paint manufactures use very little solid color with the ratio of metallic's and it tends to cover poorly and will run/sag often .

I don't think you'll get the desired results by applying the paint with a brush or roller. Typically, the best topcoat color is base coated first with a very similar color to the final coat (your metallic color). Shooting the color (spray painting) is the only way I know of that will deliver the results your after. Either by compressed air through a spray gun or high end rattle cans followed by a protective clear coat(s).

Perhaps others have a better solution....but metallic paint can be beautiful if applied correctly, or a horrible mess if not.

Good luck,

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi

The basic problem is that the color is inconsistent. With the roller, the color was consistent but when rolled on the paint had a lot of air in, leading to small bubbles that did not settle out before it began to harden. You are probably right and the only way to get a good finish out of this will be to spray it. I have a compressor but don't have a paint gun. It may be time to invest in one.

Cheers
Brian
 

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Metallic paint will require a spray gun. Not expensive at all. Mine are all harbor freight guns & do excellent. I prefer an HVLP....wastes far less paint & no overspray all over.
 

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Metallic paint will require a spray gun. Not expensive at all. Mine are all harbor freight guns & do excellent. I prefer an HVLP....wastes far less paint & no overspray all over.
:ditto:

The prices of HVLP guns have dropped to the lowerst I've seen in 10 years. I was a real snob until I used a $40. HF gun a friend of mine owns. Hardly any difference in 'feel', performance and material savings compared to my high end guns. It doesn't take long to recover the money invested in a decent HVLP gun either.

Mark
 

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Wow, I've never heard of anyone trying to brush or roll metallic paint, but I don't think it says anywhere on the can you shouldn't. Anyway like Olcowhand and others say, SPRAY, SPRAY, SPRAY. I paid 40 bucks for my HVLP gravity fed paint gun, works great, don't forget the hardener and reducer. One BIG note, Mine takes a lot of air to work right, these small air compressors wouldn't work with mine, I had to use the big shop tank. Another regulator/cheater valve would have helped, but didn't have one. I just finished painting the little MF-8 frame with my gun. I've been spraying for over 30 years, not really fair, but I can spray a cleaner line than I can write. I used a little hand masker, some cardboard, and a little tape, I'm waiting for my decals from Maple-Hunter, I'm going to lightly sand the edges of the old ones, and apply the new ones on top. That way I won't have to guess where they go. Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hi


I have run into the HVLP thing before. It is supposed to be a good system for spraying wood finishes as well as paint. I just got a catalog recently from a local tool store. They are selling the Fuji HVLP systems and calling them high end but they are expensive. They have the mini mite 3x on sale now for 600 regular 850. I'm not sure I can justify that much money although it would probably be a good investment in the long run. I will take a look at the cheaper units out there. I doubt my compressor will run a HVLP. After all, the HV stands for high volume I think the compressor is rated at 5.5cfm at 90psi and maybe 9 at 30 I'm not sure.
As always you folks have come through with some good advise. Thanks Olcowhand, Mark and Mike.
P.S. -Mike , your 8 looks great!:thThumbsU :thThumbsU

Cheers
Brian
 

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Brian,

HVLP = High Volume Low Pressure Is High Volume (paint transfer efficiency)....Low Pressure (low air pressure).

When the industry had to comply and OSHA/NIOH finally put it's foot down concerning toxic volitile organic compounds (VOC's) and emissions, they had to design a gun that uses much less air and produces much less over spray.

These guns will probably be the lowest air consumption tool in your shop. 15-20 lbs at the tip, which is slightly less than a tire chuck uses to air up your tires. I have used my small HVLP detail gun with air supplied from a Porter Cable pancake compressor.
 

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Yeah, HVLP, I know, I guess I need to add a regulator/valve., it really works great if I wait for the compressor to build up. I'm a airless user, stain, lacquer, and oil based finishes.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Brian,

HVLP = High Volume Low Pressure Is High Volume (paint transfer efficiency)....Low Pressure (low air pressure).

When the industry had to comply and OSHA/NIOH finally put it's foot down concerning toxic volitile organic compounds (VOC's) and emissions, they had to design a gun that uses much less air and produces much less over spray.

These guns will probably be the lowest air consumption tool in your shop. 15-20 lbs at the tip, which is slightly less than a tire chuck uses to air up your tires. I have used my small HVLP detail gun with air supplied from a Porter Cable pancake compressor.
Thanks Mark for clearing that up. I thought the HV referred to the air volume being high but it is the paint volume that is high in terms of the total air flow (high efficiency) It seems like the way to go as paint is expensive and waisting more paint with a conventional gun would end up costing more$ in the long run. I'm not in a big hurry to get it painted so I am going to shop arround for a stand alone unit with it's own turbine. I have seen a couple of them in the 2-300 $ range so far and I can probably justify that.

Thanks
Brian
 

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Brian,

Sorry, but the turbine powered self contained units produce way too much heat for shooting Acrylics, synthetics and oil based paints. The heat generated through the paint gun negates temperature specific reducers (thinners) and doesn't allow adequate time for the paint/primer to cure from the bottom up. The topcoat, when not allowed to flow out, looks dry, grainy and coarse.

When you buy (even inexpensive) automotive paint the jobber will (should) ask if you want slow, medium or fast reducer.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hi

This is getting complicated. All I want to do is paint my tractor with MF flint grey metallic. If someone has done that I would like to know what you used to do it. Perhaps the turbine units are meant for spraying woodworking finishes. I see that there are a variety of gun sizes, nozzle sizes (in mm. like 1.7mm). It appears that different sizes are for different thickness of material. I guess I need to do a bit more research, perhaps find some sort of online tutorial on HVLP.

Thanks
Brian
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hi

Was in to Princess Auto Friday and they had a set of 2 HVLP guns with a regulator for 60% off -about 55$ so I bought a set of them. There is a 1.7 (heavy paint)and a 1.4 mm(thinner paint) gun. I plan on practicing with them on some drywall pieces to get a feel for it before I attempt any spraying of tractor parts. Thanks again for all the advise.

Regards
Brian
 

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Hi

Was in to Princess Auto Friday and they had a set of 2 HVLP guns with a regulator for 60% off -about 55$ so I bought a set of them. There is a 1.7 (heavy paint)and a 1.4 mm(thinner paint) gun. I plan on practicing with them on some drywall pieces to get a feel for it before I attempt any spraying of tractor parts. Thanks again for all the advise.

Regards
Brian
Brian, practice is definitely a good thing, but you need to spray on similar things instead of dry-wall. The paint will act totally different on drywall than metal. To truly get a feel for spraying paint, get some old car hood or the like & practice away. This will help you learn how "not" to put on too heavy and get runs.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I have a couple of wheel barrows that could use a paint job. I may use them as a practice canvas so to speak. Metal, with rounded contours and holes etc. Should help me get a feel for things and if I make a mess it's going to have dirt in it so it won't matter. My problem right now is trying to find the time to spend a afternoon at least on practicing. There are a few on line tutorials that give basic advise but getting hands on with similiar materials will be the best use of my time.

Thanks
Brian
 
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