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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. I'm having trouble finding my last property marker. It's possible that it has been removed by somebody.

I've got a copy of the last survey that was done, but when I go to that (South-East) corner of my property, I can't find the property marker. If you look at the sketch that I've attached, you'll see that I know exactly where three points are, and that my property is basically square (or actually rectangular, it's deeper than it is wide, but my picture doesn't reflect that, because I'm not much of an artist LOL)

I want to find (about) where my last property marker should be, because I'm in the process of cutting trail around the perimeter of the property so that the wife and I can ride our side by side all the way around the outside of our property. This property marker doesn't have to be "legal" by any means, I just want to cut trail on MY property, and make sure that I'm not trespassing and cutting trail on one of my neighbor's property. I'll probably stay15'-20' inside of my property line with my trail to make sure that I'm not encroaching too closely to my neighbor's property.

Now, if I stand at point "A", and fly my drone from point "A" to point "B", my controller will tell me exactly how many feet it is from point "A" to point "B". And likewise, it will tell me how many feet it is from point "B" to point "C". Also, if I fly from point "A" to point "C" it will tell me how many feet long that the hypotenuse angle is as well. Now, if I use the Pythagorean Theorem, in theory, I can figure out where (about) my last property boundary is. But in reality, I don't know how to place it. Any suggestions?
Rectangle Font Parallel Symmetry Pattern
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Jeff...what material are the marker that you have located made of?
There are two "posts". Point "A", and point "C" both have metal posts placed in the ground with little yellow tags on them from the surveying company. Point "B", we just know where it is because of a copy of the last survey, and know that our property is bordered by the two roads.
 

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Usually steel rods topped with a plastic cap. The use of a metal detector can be of help. You have the general area to sweep with the detector. Being as how the area likely has had not much human impact, you likely won't find all sorts of other metal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Usually steel rods topped with a plastic cap. The use of a metal detector can be of help. You have the general area to sweep with the detector. Being as how the area likely has had not much human impact, you likely won't find all sorts of other metal.
I've heard/been told that before. I don't have a metal detector, and really didn't want to buy one just for this one time usage. And as I stated in my initial post, it doesn't have to be a "legal" marker that would hold up in court, I just want a pretty accurate approximation, so that I can be sure that I'm not trespassing on my neighbor's property.
 

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@Flaken has you on the right track. When the new owners of the land next to me came in and "marked" the property they had those metal stakes with caps placed at the corners. Unfortunately, one of them was right on a spot that I keep mowed and they are a pain to mow around. Somehow the metal stake sank slightly below ground level, now mowing is much easier!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
@Flaken has you on the right track. When the new owners of the land next to me came in and "marked" the property they had those metal stakes with caps placed at the corners. Unfortunately, one of them was right on a spot that I keep mowed and they are a pain to mow around. Somehow the metal stake sank slightly below ground level, now mowing is much easier!
Nice! Not to mention, how convenient that was for you LOL!
 

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Usually steel rods topped with a plastic cap. The use of a metal detector can be of help. You have the general area to sweep with the detector. Being as how the area likely has had not much human impact, you likely won't find all sorts of other metal.
Only if done in the last 20 years or so. Before that don't plan on finding plastic caps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Can you provide some measurements and angle?
I would prefer coordinates but!
I can and will in the next couple of days. I'm waiting for my drone to be shipped back to me. It's supposed to be here this coming Tuesday. I prefer using that, as it tells me exactly how man feet it is away from me, and the measurements will be much more precise using that vs. trying to step it off etc...
 

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Your survey should show the distance from A-D and C-D. Take rough measurements until the two points meet each other at marker D. If you don't know those measurements your township may have a better survey on file.
 

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I'm old school, as in I studied surveying over 50 years ago when we didn't have GPS or drones. I'd get a 100' tape measure and a laser to shoot a line from point A to the area of the unknown point and place two markers in line with point C, then use the laser and tape to find the unknown point from C on that line formed by the two markers.

It's not land surveyor precise, but if done with reasonable care, the unknown point will be inches from where the two lines cross.

There may be a reason why a pin was not set at that corner. A large underground rock that can't be moved that is just below the surface is one, and to compensate, offset tie ins are used at some reasonable distance so that the precise location can be found with a measuring tape. For that, you need the surveyors notes.
 

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Like most things, one can rent a metal detector. Check in your area for rental places, such as Redi Rental, the metal detectors there cost $33 a day. The newer metal stakes (last 20-40 years) are simple rebar which may or may not have a wooden stake next to it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So your trying to do this without surveyors notes?
Yes. I just want a "pretty close" idea of where the fourth and last property boundary is, so that I can cut a trail (on my side of the property line), about 20' or so inside of it, and make sure that I'm still on my property. The other land that belongs to my neighbor(s) is undeveloped, so it probably wouldn't be a HUGE deal if my trail encroached on their property. But in trying to be a good neighbor, I'd rather stay on my side of the property line and not have to worry about issues with them going forward.
 

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If you have a clear line of sight to the missing point while standing at point "A" or at point "C" you can set up a step ladder or some other portable platform and lay a cheap plastic protractor on it. Sight down the angle mentioned in your survey towards the missing point and measure out the distance. You can lay a pencil on the protractor and look down it, or if you want to be really fussy, screw the protractor to a scrap piece of wood and then pound in a couple of finish nails into the wood to use as aiming points. Depending on the distances involved, you can get pretty darn close doing this. I would think you could be within 2 feet on a 400 foot property line using a little care.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
This post is useless without dimensions and an angle.
I said somewhere above that I WILL give the three dimensions that I know of on Tuesday when I get my drone back, as that will count off exactly how many feet are in between the three points of reference that I have so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
If you have a clear line of sight to the missing point while standing at point "A" or at point "C" you can set up a step ladder or some other portable platform and lay a cheap plastic protractor on it. Sight down the angle mentioned in your survey towards the missing point and measure out the distance. You can lay a pencil on the protractor and look down it, or if you want to be really fussy, screw the protractor to a scrap piece of wood and then pound in a couple of finish nails into the wood to use as aiming points. Depending on the distances involved, you can get pretty darn close doing this. I would think you could be within 2 feet on a 400 foot property line using a little care.
Thanks!
 
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