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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm interested in experience of folks who have adapted, or hauled motorcycles on a small stake side utility trailer.

I recently bought a Yamaha XT250, and borrowed a very nice motorcycle hauling trailer from my neighbor to bring it home. My intention is to haul two similar bikes (mine and my Son's) to our cabin in the mountains on a trailer. Park it there and then ride, explore, and adventure the roads, trails, powerlines, gas lines, fire roads, ... from there.

Yesterday I went to pick up a CL three-up motorcycle hauling trailer. It didn't go well. The trailer wiring was just kind of strung from hitch to light. The connections were twisted, but not taped, or wire-nutted. The title was in the owner's sister's maiden name (which failed the Notary/Tag/Title transfer places requirements). But, worst of all, there was a tremendous amount of flex in the trailer. Standing at the rear, and pushing down on either of the outside tracks flexed the trailer several inches. I know sometimes I am impatient, but I walked away.

I already own a 50" by 96" utility trailer, rated for 1500 lbs. It rides on a relatively stiff set of leaf springs, balances very nicely, and tracks/pulls easily. Though I've never made a long trip with it, rather I pull my tractor to service as necessary, same with my ATV, and more often haul mulch (over loaded).

So, I'm re-evaluating my plan. I'm thinking of adding a pair of front wheel chocks to my existing trailer, probably make a sturdy ramp even though the trailer is a tilt bed. And towing with the trailer I already own.

Here is a link to a pair of these chocks on Amazon that is not too expensive:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01ATT4IAE/ref=od_aui_detailpages00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I have proper tie down and soft straps. I would likely stagger the chocks when I mount them to the deck so the handlebars of the cycles don't interfere. I would also likely attach them so they would be easy to remove for the more regular use of the trailer.

So, anyone done something similar? Anyone see any problems, or concerns. The deck height of my utility is only about 20", but that is still about 10" higher than a single purpose bike hauler. Alternative ideas?

To be honest, I prefer to store my equipment (even trailers) under cover, and I do not have room for another trailer, heck, I'm still rearranging to get the motorcycle in my garage.

Pictures: Neighbor's trailer borrowed, unloading my ATV from my trailer, my trailer laying on it's side during a recent rewiring project, and an up-side-down picture of my new motorcycle on my neighbor's trailer about halfway across the PA turnpike
 

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well your neigbor's trailer is upside down, which might be a problem if the bikes aren't really well secured.

I carried all sorts of bikes all sorts of ways; pickups, big campers with rear racks, and even on boats.

put the front tire up against the front of your nice looking utility trailer, and use ratchet straps to pull down the suspension a bit. Secure the rear as well, nice and tight.

That's it, but best to keep the trailer upright, not on it's side or upside down while loaded.

I was transporting a barge; the deck was 5' above the quay. I had a ramp, but the angle was like 45 degrees and the bike frame would hit at the top corner; so I semi-wheelied it, becoming briefly airborne as I topped the 12" wide ramp, and then hit the brakes hard as I landed on top, so as not to slide right off the far edge of the boat.

I don't ride anymore.
I'm still alive, and decided I like it that way.
 

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motorcycle cowboy
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I've used a similar type of chock such as that before, worked pretty well. I would use ratchet type straps. I think you'll do fine, sounds like a good plan.:thThumbsU
 

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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Mark and Rooster,

Here is yet another alternative, I could borrow the Church's van and load like a pro:



Yea, MTF singularly manages to load pictures upside down, while all other websites I've ever loaded pictures too seem to have figured out top from bottom. Feel free to ignore upside down pictures, or better yet, point out they are upside down.
 

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motorcycle cowboy
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762 Posts
Thanks Mark and Rooster,

Here is yet another alternative, I could borrow the Church's van and load like a pro:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lYeu56_RP4A


Yea, MTF singularly manages to load pictures upside down, while all other websites I've ever loaded pictures too seem to have figured out top from bottom. Feel free to ignore upside down pictures, or better yet, point out they are upside down.
You've gotten pretty good with your camera work, so if you achieve riding skills that advanced, some good video will be expected.:tango_face_grin:
 

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motorcycle cowboy
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Professional Homeowner
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I used a device called a Canyon Dancer. Best motorcycle hauling accessory HANDS DOWN! It loops onto the handle grips, and ties down on either side, thus holding the bike up by the handlebars, with no contact between ratchet strap hooks and the bike.
 

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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Discussion Starter #10
Not at all sure I follow the last two posts, but I'll respond as best I understand:

well i know you have it home already
but next time tie the front rim down also not the tire john
There was nothing tied to a tire, but for that matter, neither was anything tied to a rim. The tie down straps compressed the suspension of the motorcycle about 1/3.

I used a device called a Canyon Dancer. Best motorcycle hauling accessory HANDS DOWN! It loops onto the handle grips, and ties down on either side, thus holding the bike up by the handlebars, with no contact between ratchet strap hooks and the bike.
I've seen them, but I used two pair of "soft loops" (they are the orange things that are touching the bike). They are just web loops, no metal at all. The "Soft loops" provide a place for the vinyl covered ratchet strap hooks to take hold of. The ratchet straps are red. Then, the remaining length of the ratchet straps were just tied off so they wouldn't whip around in the wind.


 

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Something like this, it sits, no bolts, in the bed of the trailer and holds the front wheel steady. Then tie the bike down as you choose.

trackside_roll_on_wheel_chock_detail.jpg

https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/trackside-roll-on-wheel-chock?gclid=CIjBiN66yNMCFdhMDQod8bADpA


maxresdefault.jpg

Or build one out of PT framing lumber for peanuts.


I've transported a few bikes on my utility trailer in the past. The forward headboard of my trailer is open so I pushed the bike into it and then tied the front wheel down to the tongue of the trailer to keep the bike planted. Then tied it down at all 4 corners.
 

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By all means use what you already got. Just push the front wheels into the front corners of the trailer, put a strap to the front and a strap to the side, compress the suspension a third of it's travel or so, and you can actually travel like that quite nicely, but the rears will bounce around, possibly into each other. So strap the backs down like you did on your neighbor's trailer, making sure to compress the suspension a couple inches, and you're good to go.

If that makes you a little nervous, or you just don't like the aesthetics, a homemade chock as shown by BOSOX would be functionally fine (two-bay, of course). I'd just make the bottom front board a wide as the trailer so there's no way it can slid around (looks like BOSOX used some tie-down eyes for the same reason). The straps will hold every thing down/together. Straps are fastened to the trailer, NOT the chock, of course. :)

Have some fun!
 

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Ive thought that a piece of channel bent up at the front and braced would be a good idea. A few carrage bolts holding it in place that can be removed, and it could hold bolth wheels solid in the trailer... Might be over kill though, and a front chock like the store bought, or homemade ones shown would be more then enough.. Ive always just done the "jam the wheel into the corner, and strap, and pray" way... I always worry shes going to tip over though...
 

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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Discussion Starter #14
Well after a long heal and rehab for my son's broken wrist, he finally was able to complete his safety course, passed his license exam and found the bike he wanted.

Of course, morning temps in the teens made for great pick up weather in the chock mounted trailer.

ImageUploadedByMyTractorForum Free App1510445558.042458.jpg

Only about a 30 mile tow, worked great.
 

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Well after a long heal and rehab for my son's broken wrist, he finally was able to complete his safety course, passed his license exam and found the bike he wanted.

Of course, morning temps in the teens made for great pick up weather in the chock mounted trailer.

View attachment 2129761

Only about a 30 mile tow, worked great.
Congrats to him! :tango_face_smile: Now you both can ride on the street together.
 

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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Discussion Starter #16
It's the first day of Spring - It's snowing like a blizzard is approaching for our 4th Nor'easter of the month, and Scout and I dug some post holes and set some concrete fence posts this morning. So, I'm here catching up on some critical MTF posts. We are still waiting for some good riding weather, but we did finally get the double chocks bolted down, the two bikes up on the trailer, and a test drive to a nearby riding place. (Yes, we could have just ridden there, but that would have missed the point of our test).

Worked out great. And, in a stoke of pure coincidence, we benchmarked my son's new-to-him Subaru Outback.

(Picture likely already posted to the Motorcycle Forum - sorry to anyone troubled by seeing a picture twice)
 

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Glad the trailer you had worked out for you guys. What brand of chocks did you end up with? I use a condor chock thats easy to move from trailer to Rv to lift..

I feel your pain tho.. I'm so ready to get back on the bike, As are my sons too.. Its a lot of fun being able to ride with the boys, its a great way to spend time with them.
 

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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Discussion Starter #18

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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Discussion Starter #20
Took off a couple weeks ago for a 2 hour run to Weiser State Forest here in PA. Everything worked great. Our all steel folding ramp had been overloaded by a borrowing buddy and returned silently. So, we needed to throw a block of wood under the center hinge to support the bikes. No problem. I'll need to get a little weld job done on these.

No big problem though, I found a nice aluminum folding ramp that is much lighter, easier to deploy, and not yet broken.

Next week we head out for a 4 hour run to Tiadaughton State Forest, where my cabin is. So, on this, another rainy day in spring, I pulled the hub on each wheel, inspected, re-greased, and smacked the cap back on. Topped up the tires, and tested the new-to-me ramp.
 

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