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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all. I'm new here. A couple of years ago our lawn tractor rolled down a hill and had an unfortunate meeting with the back of our concrete garage. It started sputtering gas and the engine was sputtering too. I'm tired of paying someone to cut this grass, so I'm getting it fixed one way or another. It's a Murry tractor with a Tecumseh engine model OHV175-204803A. I had DH show me the damage, and after looking at the manual for the engine on-line (thank you MTF) I think that the carburetor is the problem. I was thinking that once I knew what the problem was, I could call some local repair shops (I have three recommendations) and see if I could get an estimate before bringing it in order to prevent sticker shock (or being ripped off.) BUT, now that I can see what it is, I'm wondering if I can possibly fix this myself? Just some background about me: I'm pretty handy (for a girl) when it comes to the house, BUT, I know nothing about engines. I don't mind taking things apart and seeing what is broken, but I am *very* nervous around engines and motors because I have absolutely no background knowledge, and would not have any clue where to begin troubleshooting. But then again, the problem with fixing most things is diagnosing the problem, and I already think it's the carburetor, so I'm halfway there. But I don't even know how the carburetor works? It may even be as simple as that little silver-colored bowl clip at the bottom. So I'm looking for opinions. Is this something that someone like myself could handle, or should I just take it in? It's also going to need a tune-up, which I don't plan on doing. And when the accident occurred, the brackets that hold the hood in place bent, so the hood is now crooked (possibly rubbing on the carb.) I think I'm gonna take it apart and try to bend the brackets back before splurging for new ones. And one other thing, the battery appears to be dead, no surprise since it's been sitting in the back of the garage for 2 yrs. DH says that unlike a car battery, it can't be charged. I find that hard to believe??

 

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Welcome to the forum. We are glad to have you. It looks like the bowl has become unseated. Can you just remove the hold down clip and reseat it. The gas if any is in it, is probably old and needs to be drained and fresh gas put in it. The battery after setting that long is a goner. I am not familiar with your mower or engine but someone should be along who is. Good luck.
 

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The Magnificent
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Your battery is just like a small car battery and should be able to be charged. This one is probably long dead, but worth a try.

Hard to tell is the float bowl is just knocked loose, or bent. Worth popping it off to have a look at the float and needle and seat assembly to see if those were damaged.

Looks like you have a quick release for the float bowl.

Drain or shut off fuel, and disconnect the battery and go have a look at that carb.

Girls with wrenches are hot, btw.
 

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On those carbs, you will need to pop the little clip over, and gently drop the bowl down, clean it out gently. Then slide it back up onto the carb body, twist and rock it gently until it seats, then snap the arm back over.

Replace the battery, sitting even a year will ruin one of these batts. They can be charged but they wont hold it after sitting that long.

And be careful on hills...

also, I agree with D-Dogg, a female slingin wrenches and getting her hands dirty is awesome. None of the women down here will do that. They see dirt and run the other way.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Okay, thanks for the replies. I guess I'm gonna go for it and open up the carb and take a look. How do I clean it? With a rag? And how do I drain the old gas out? And make sure it's *all* out? My preference would be to try to run it out of gas, because if I drain it, I have to find a place to dispose of it. But I asked DH, and he didn't add fuel stabilizer, so I guess I'm gonna have to drain it. And do I drain it before I open up the carb? I'm assuming, yes, otherwise it'll start pouring out. I'm also thinking that I shouldn't bother trying to charge the battery if it definitely won't hold. I'm not going to have time to do any of this until Thursday, but I'll report back then with my finding. Thanks everyone!

P.S. You're more likely to find me using a hammer than a wrench. And if I do have a wrench, it's probably because I'm working on the plumbing. :banghead3
 

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Welcome to the forum.

If it was mine i would get some eco friendly degreaser and gently clean all the gunk away from the carb before working on it. May be even gently try to push carb bowl back onto proper position before removing it. Be careful not damage the gasket.

Overall looks like an easy fix. Good luck!
 

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The Magnificent
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That's a real good idea, Art.

As far as draining the old gas, if the carb is gravity fed, just clamp the supply line a few inches back from the carb, slip it off and point it into an empty gas can to drain. If you have a vehicle with a large tank, it would be pretty safe to dump this old gas into the tank unless you have reason to suspect there my be water in it.

To clean the carb, you need to be wearing safety goggles. Chances are good you can just remove the float bowl and the air cleaner to get it pretty clean. I would only remove it if I couldn't get the tractor to start. Use a can of Gumout carb cleaner (or similar carb cleaner) with a straw (should come with the can) to clean all the passages.

I would clean the spark plug and change the oil and filter as well.

Since the engine has been sitting for a while, it wouldn't hurt to shoot a little oil into the spark plug hole and crank the engine a few times to lubricate the rings before you try to start it up.
 

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The way the bowl on that carb is cocked,I'm thinking that most of the gas has either leaked out or else your tank is lower than the carb and you probably wont get a lot of gas to come out.If you have a pair of vice grips,they work good to clamp the line off back near the filter,then just put the end of the line in a can,release the vice grips and see what comes out.You might as well put a new filter in while you have the gas out.
Compressed air works ok to clean the worst of that gunk off the top of your carb before you take the bowl off,if you don't have an air compressor,then the spray carb cleaners will work also,just make sure your wearing safety glasses either way.
If you can get the fuel out and get the carb straightened out,you can probably handle most of what that engine needs to tune it up,it looks like a newer engine with electronic ignition,so your mainly looking at a sparkplug and air cleaner,the only other thing would be getting the head off and cleaning the carbon off the head and piston but you would probably be ok if you don't want to attempt that on your first tuneup.
Next step would be changing oil,you've got a filter,under the carb to replace,it's best to start the engine and let it warm up a little,then drain the oil,replace the filter and put new oil in the engine.In most cases,gender isn't an issue when it comes to maintaining an engine,it has more to do with desire.:fing32:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Okay, I finally had a chance to work on this on Sunday afternoon. Here's an update. First I gently removed the bowl retainer (metal clip) and tried to reposition the bowl. That didn't work. Then I wiped the gunk off the outside of the carb before removing the bowl, at which point I was able to drain all the gas (less than 1/4 gallon) by allowing it to flow through the bowl and into a gas can. I examined everything as best I could (I don't really know what I'm looking for) and I noticed that what I would call a gasket is bent. The manual that I'm looking at on-line does not show this piece. It feels like a thin piece of flexible plastic that is coated with black latex. As you can see from the photo (I hope,) it's bent, and there also appears to be some damage/bending near the hole where the blue colored "main nozzle emulsion" exits. Now I see in the manual that it states, " Whenever a carburetor bowl is removed for service, the fuel bowl O ring (or gasket on Series "7") and the bowl nut washer must be replaced. For easier installation, lubricate the O ring with a small amount of oil." I also don't see the "bowl nut washer" on the diagram! And I'm assuming that the gasket that they refer to (for my Series 7 carb) is the big one that is bent, not the small one shown on the diagram. And without taking the guts apart, how can I tell if anything else is damaged? It looks like the blue main nozzle emulsion may be bent. And as far as the bowl not sitting correctly, I have a couple of theories. One is that the "bowl retainer" clip got bent out of shape, and I can simply replace that and the gasket and be done with it. Also, there is a small amount of damage to the bottom of the plastic bowl. It doesn't seem like it's bad enough to prevent the bowl retainer from sitting correctly, but maybe I need to replace the entire bowl, in which case, maybe I should see if I can order it with all the guts pre-installed if possible. How much could it cost? BTW, I cannot get the bowl retainer off on the right-hand side, no matter how hard I pull. I guess I'll use some tools, which will definitely bend it out of shape.

Here's a dumb question: Is all that shiny silver-colored metal above the carb bowl considered part of the carb? I really don't want to mess with that! But, as I was wiping the gunk off, I *slightly* damaged a dust seal that covers one of the springs. You can kinda see this on the pic that shows the bottom of the metal plate (which I don't know the name of.) I don't think I can replace them easily, so I'd rather just leave it alone.

Okay, I look forward to your replies, and sorry about all the pics, but I didn't want to leave anything out. Thanks!





 

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Looking at your pics, the bowl is damaged where the clip holds it in position. My past experience with these plastic bowls on a Tecumseh is there isn't much you can do to them except get a new one. The last on I worked on it cost around $15 for the entire lower part with everything needed to replace. I was told by the dealer where I got mine that this was a throw-away item anyway that were never intended to be repaired. Just take your old part and the numbers off the engine to a Tecumseh dealer and they should be able to fix you up.:thThumbsU
 

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I don't see anything there that looks like it would be much of an issue,the bent gasket should straighten out and seal ok,just make sure that you get it over the guide pins ok.The broken piece on the bottom of the carb just retains the clip and it looks like there should be enough left to do that ok.If a new bowl is only $15.00,that really isn't bad to have new though.There are a couple of things that could be keeping yours from seating,that main nozzle emulsion doesn't look like it's seated all the way,the other thing is,are you sure that you have the holes lined up with the guide pins?The silver part that you asked about is the main body of the carb,that's where the air and fuel get mixed,there probably isn't any reason to take that off,unless you try to start it and it won't start but as clean as the rest of it looks,I don't think it'll be an issue.
 

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Looks like your doing well for your first Carburator rebuild. Techumse can be finkey engines so if you get er running be proud of yourself. There is a lot of good information on here already but I will add my 2 cents worth.

I would jerry rig the bowl on to the carberatour housing just to see if that stops the pouring of gasoline and see if it will run it WILL LEAK because it has been sitting for two years and you have had it apart but it should not pour gasoline out like you were talking about.

If you find that that works got to your parts dealer get your self a new bowl carb kit an oil filter and some good 30 weight oil valvoline castrol any big brands stay away from the el cheapo brands like advance or autozone oil they tend not be as refined as well and do an oil change once you get the new parts on the carb

You might also want to have the battery tested at advance just to see if it is good after you charge it but it will be fine until you get it running I say this because your 12v battery has six cells if one is dead than it mess up your voltage regulator on your tractor if you runn it for extended periods of time but short burst wont hurt it

Very good pictures of the problem good job getting the carb lean Ive seen things not work because they were so dirty that nothing had any room to move

engines especially single cylinders are suprisingly simple machines If your unfimaler the best thing I can suggest is an exploded digram and a repair manual and have at er If you ever want to learn carburator theroy find a diffrent carb to learn on that was not the best one to learn how it works but your doing well

Pretty handy for a girl next time you say that just leave for a girl out because your handy period espically since some people I know don't know which end of a screwdriver is the handle

oh yeah and change the fuel filter when you do the oil
 

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GArdengirl I would use that old float bowl as long as the mating surface is not warped so it will seal properly.
 

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Well Gardengirl, did you repale the bowl and get running?
 
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