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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, first of all, I apologize for not having any pics yet....but I just had to share this with someone who'd understand!

I worked 5 days this week, and when I got off work today, after helping the wife around the house, I got to tinker on the 2186. I went back to my stock muffler setup. It required pulling the side panels, front grille, and hood, I had to grind off the copious welds that were applied to the adapter that was welded onto my stock exhaust downpipe. I eventually got the adapter off, and managed to not gouge the downpipe too bad. The old muffler fit on there, and I bolted it back together.....success. Quiet as a mouse again.

Time to play.

So I'd been blazing a trail down the steeeeeep hill behind my house that leads into the valley, where all the firewood is. It was still light out, and armed with quiet exhaust, no mower deck, and a slight buzz on I decided to go offroading with the Cub.

I had a blast! It crept down the newly blazed trail very well with the PowerTrac Ags (loaded) in the rear. I could stop in the middle of the hill no problem (and I only weight 150lbs). Finally got into the valley, and I decided to keep going into the woods, past where I had cleared. Since the tractor is so small, I could navigate around all the trees, brush, and rocks easily. Traction and stability were impressive.

Then I spied it - the hill that was already cleared when we moved in this summer. I knew from the get-go that I couldn't use it as an access into the woods, it was way too steep and uneven. But today I felt differently. I wanted to try it. Just once.

I started the climb slowly past brush, leaves, loose soil, rocks, and roots. As I approached the mountain's zenith I knew I had to just lay into the 2186. I floored it and spun ruts about 10 ft from the top. I backed down slowly, carefully - my arms trembling from the adrenaline. It hit me at this point just how steep it really was. I watched my front wheels intently to make sure they didn't creep up on me. I attribute part of the stability to the 18 HP Command sittin pretty up front :)

So, I backed down about a 1/4 of the way and floored it again from a standstill. I could hear the gear whine, could feel the ags diggin in, but eventually I hit the same rut again. I backed down a third time and before I gave it another try I paused to collect my senses.

It was truly marvelous that I had made it this far. I could back down now and still ride up to the house from the path I came in on and feel pretty triumphant.

Nope. I want to go THIS WAY up :)

I saw why I was getting stuck - the rut had me breaking traction when I needed it most. So this time I stuck to the side just a hair - which was hard to do with a mess of rocks on the right hand side. It spun just like before, but this time it really dug in. I almost thought I wasn't go to make it, but I kept the pedal down. I almost slowed to a crawl, but it never completely stopped moving! I was greeted by the beautiful view of my backyard, to which I promptly replied with a couple full speed turns and one-wheel peels while screaming in triumph.

Ridiculous Appalachian Hill : 0

Cub Cadet 2186: 1

:)
 

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sounds like you had a real fun time...of course pictures would have made this story better but I forgive you......your story is a good example of why pressure lubed engines are better, i never would have tried this with my 1862 that magnum would have blew up before i reached the top of the hill...but i would sure like to try that some time
 

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Sounds like you had a good time. slkpk
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I did have fun - and you're right about the full pressure lubed engines....I used to cringe every time I mowed a slope with the old K Series Kohler. They're stout engines, but full pressure lubed systems like on the Commands are really nice if well maintained.

Just got my phone's uploads working again, so I'll get some pics today for sure guys. once you see the hill, I think you'll understand. :) Wife was not happy about it either, which further points to the event being enjoyable :)
 

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Farm Show
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I sure do watch the incline I'am on with this old oil slinger. I always keep the oil on the full mark.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
....as promised!

There's two hills here, the cleared one that is all mud is the main access. The other one that isn't cleared is basically a foot path from the house to the valley. It poured down rain today, so I was lucky to get in there and back out even without the trailer. Gotta add some weight in the back, too I think. Loaded tires alone aren't gonna cut it with a load of wood to pull.

















 

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I have the exact same year and model 2186 as yours. I have added the tri-rib front tires, tube bumper, rear Ag-tires and 50+ lbs of steel wheel weights in each rear wheel. I wish there was a good looking way to make a stack exhaust though.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
How you like the tri-ribs? Did you with the Firestones? What type of Ags are you runnin on teh back? My next set of front tires (probably tax time, if not by the time I hit 350hrs on the tractor) is either gonna be tri-ribs or the V61s.

I'm workin on my custom tube bumper as well, and trying to get a better seat (and modify the mounting bracket to get me more leg room).

As far as exhaust goes, I've tried brainstorming it - and with it being a V-Twin, you could easily run stacks on it, but with the hood and side panels being designed as they are, there's not a very easy way to do it without either cutting into the sheetmetal or running the exhaust down, around the panels, and back up (would look ridiculous)!

As I've said countless times before, I love the tractor. It has very few shortcomings in my opinion, and does everything it was designed to do.
 

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if the hill is steep enough to need a running start AND lose traction, you need to be very careful. i would put some front weight on it, if you had not started spinning then odds are the front would have started rising. especially if you are going to modify the seat for more leg room, as this will shift your weight even further back on the tractor!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I do need to be reminded of these things form time to time....thanks :) Especially good point about the seat being moved - I wouldn't have considered that.

It was definitely scary - but I've done enough off-roading before to know when enough is ENOUGH. Its just fun to blur that line very now and then. The older I get, the less inclined I feel to tempt fate s I once did. In most cases that is a very good thing.

I have to say though, that I was surprised that I was able to do with it what I did. Now that I know it can do it, I'm content. No more crazy hill climbs. However, I did blaze the trail for a reason - and when we get the wood stove up and running again, I'll be hauling wood up the less steep hill regularly. I probably have a few weeks to get things figured out and get some weight in the front tires to balance out the rear weight.
 

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Wow, that is a heck of a hill! The 2186 is looking good in the woods. Very surprized with your set up thus far! I'am thinking the 3 rib front tires for the 72 myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I think the tri-ribs look best on the 70s and 100s Cubs! I've always wondered how they would look on a newer MTD Cub....
 

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I really like the increased steering traction the tri-ribs gave my 2186. I believe all my tires came from Tucker Tire located in Tennessee. I do have to be careful not to turn too sharply when mowing as the tires can really cut a rut when not careful.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
That's what I've heard about the Tri Ribs on any tractor.

How's the steering effort, did it help relieve some of the load on the steering?

Do you have any pics of it with the tri ribs on?
 

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I think it steers alot easier with the tri-ribs. I'll have to get some pics taken and posted up.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
:) That'd be awesome :)

My main hesitation with getting V61s or Tri-Ribs was that they'd look goofy. Now I'll be able to see for myself!
 

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Jsoluna, love the pictures the tractor looks great out in the woods working:thThumbsU:trink40:, bet that commands sounds good out there in the woods when its all quiet. This is were I would have to say this is why power steering is great it dosent matter what front tires I have it all steers the same. The only down side is if something gos out then im in trouble.:banghead3
The action shots make me jealous:crybaby:...I live in town and the only time I get to use my tractors the most for work is the winter and you know how Ohio winters can be(it has been raining for 3 days if it was colder we might have snow but the ground temps would kill anything actually sticking) I cant wait to put the 1862 to work and see how it does.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Well, we're even then - cause I'm jealous of your power steering and the 1862 you have in general! Some day....some day....

The Command does sound great out there in the quietness of the valley :) I'm liking the stock muffler now that I went back to it. I loved the growl it had with the different exhaust, but I like the quiet even more :)

And I hear ya about Ohio winters. Its been cold rain for what seems like an ETERNITY around here. There's rumors on the wind of snow showers tonight, but it won't amount to much. Can't wait to plow some snow this year, but our area hasn't had much in the way of snow in a long time.
 
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