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Discussion Starter #101
Moving forward today...

Resolved the toolbox problem...

https://www.mytractorforum.com/43-tool-time/1319433-help-craftsman-toolbox-keys-lost.html#post12208387

... and found my old grinder!!!

It's immaculate, looks like it was used once at most (grinding disks are still in the shrink-wrap). Came with a case, three disks and a wire wheel brush (remember when tools still came with useful things like these???).

Of course, it's a 4-inch grinder and all of the cutting wheels that I bought are 4.5 inch, so I'm heading out to buy more stuff...

Still, I doubt anyone has ever been as happy to see an old Craftsman grinder before!

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #102
As Emeril would say... BAM!!!

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #104
So...some details....how did it go?...looks like a nice clean cut:thThumbsU
Cut like butter. I'm still working on getting it all re-connected, here's a pic of the stub.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #105
IT'S ALIVE!!!!!!

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #106
Runs awesome, and splits great!!!

More pics of a test split, nasty old oak stump.

Thanks again everyone for all of the advice and guidance, even if I was slow to convince!

Cleaning up now, just about out of daylight.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #108 (Edited)
Thanks Mike!

Now that it's splitting again, I'll splurge for a second tire (slow leak, and is weather cracked). I'll eventually want to replace the cotter pin with a stainless one that's the proper size. And, the hydraulic fluid and filter are probably due to be changed. A slightly longer tarp to cover it would also be nice. Should probably replace the Lovejoy spider, as this one is cracked.

There are also two shelves (one has broken off, the other is bent), need to get those straight and welded with some gussets. A log lift, log table and re-paint would be great in the long term.

But, none of those things are urgent.


More about today:

I wore my face shield, earmuffs and heavy gloves while grinding. I was a little worried about the gas in the tank, but didn't see an easy way to drain it without causing a spill and bigger hazard. Was very happy to be wearing the face shield, as I was getting showered with sparks. Swear that I felt a couple of hot spots hitting the top of my head...

The cut was pretty clean. I used the collar as a guide, came out way straighter than if I'd free-handed it. I would cut about a third of an inch, rotate the shaft and repeat. That's why you can see that pattern in the cutoff piece. When finished, there was one tiny line where the cuts weren't even.

After cutting, I removed the collar and started the engine. I used a hand file, with the engine at idle speed, to clean up the cut and round down the edges a bit. The keyway really didn't need any cleanup.

I goobered up (thanks Taryl) the shaft, key and inside of the Lovejoy coupler with anti-sieze. I had to tap the key into place with a hammer, and used a block of wood with a hammer to tap the coupler into place. Once on, I bolted the pump onto the engine (used the original bolts, and all holes lined right up!), and aligned the couplers using a large screwdriver (eyeballed against a pic I'd taken before pulling the pump from the old engine). Then I tightened the setscrew.

After that, I pulled the pump back off to see where the key was lining up. It really looked like I could have taken less off the shaft than I did, so I pulled the coupler and moved the key away from the engine a bit more (so the setscrew wouldn't be too close to the end of the key), then reassembled everything, gapped the coupler and tightened it up.

I'll feel better after splitting a cord or two, but this is major, major progress!!!

Bonus pics of the grinder package and the cutting disk I used (TSC, Mibro brand, 4-inch, 1/8 thick, Type 27A). Took a good quarter inch off the wheel!


And yes, the woodstove feels great right about now!!!

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #111 (Edited)
I ran the splitter for a few hours yesterday (on and off), at 2/3-3/4 throttle. Didn't really stress it very much (only had one or two tough pieces, oak Y-shaped joints between branches, but not very large). I heard the pump strain a bit, but not too bad. The engine seemed to run flawlessly.

Mike
 

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roym:Don't make the engine work hard at part throttle, it will overheat and carbon up.

I would suggest working the engine at differing throttle settings. I don't see how running at part throttle will hurt unless it is worked at low settings, where there may be less cooling air across the cylinder & head. At low settings, the splash lubrication system may provide less splash, which will affect cooling as the oil absorbs heat from the cylinder walls, piston, etc, and mixes it with the remaining lube in the sump. Heat can radiate from the areas splashed by the lubricant.
I would attempt to modify the load on the engine, with periods of hard work, followed by backing off for a bit, allowing the engine to develop a bit of vacuum in the intake, pulling oil up onto the rings a bit, and also letting the splash carry away some of the temperature increase from hard work.
The basic thing I have is that changing the load and rpm, interspersed with periods of loafing, is better than running at a constant speed, at least for the first few hours of operation.
Trying to do this with engine powered emergency generators is difficult as they are designed to operate at 3600 rpm out of the box, immediately upon startup. Inverter generators will vary the rpm if load is added and removed.
The Predator has a throttle control to set the desired rpm. It should be able to handle running at the rpm that results. I think anything above idle should be proper use of the machine, but again would caution against running at idle for any length of time. It is not a hit-n-miss that will happily chug at 35 rpm. With the throttle set in the middle, the governor will open the throttle plate as needed to match the spring tension set by the throttle control. It can go to wide open if needed to maintain the selected rpm. Once the load lessens, the throttle plate will tend to close, as the governor releases and gives in to the spring tension. Setting at mid-rpm just limits the top rpm achieved, not the throttle plate opening. OTOH, you do not want to 'lug' the engine by setting a very low rpm, and having it work to split an 'all-nighter' log. Roy is very correct in that.
tom
 

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Discussion Starter #114
Gotcha. I've seen lots of comments over the years about not running snowblower engines at full throttle, as they produce more torque at lower RPMs. I'm not concerned about cooling the engine at this time of year (ambient temperature was in the low-mid 30s F).

Mike
 

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Gotcha. I've seen lots of comments over the years about not running snowblower engines at full throttle, as they produce more torque at lower RPMs. I'm not concerned about cooling the engine at this time of year (ambient temperature was in the low-mid 30s F).

Mike
If you put enough load on it, the engine will slow down to that "torquy" range.
I don't have any experience with SB's, but I would expect you want high engine speed to toss the snow as far as possible in most cases.
 

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Every small engine torque curve I've seen has peak torque in the 22-2500 rpm range with peak HP increasing to 3600 rpm.

That said operating at peak torque is also operating at reduced rpm. Which is reduced inertia in the flywheel. Any activity with variable heavy loading like snow blowing you want that RPM built up such that loads are cleared by the inertia.
 

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Discussion Starter #119
Well, it's been almost two months since I last ran the splitter, but I used it again today (ambient temps in low 60s F). Started on first pull, ran flawlessly for the better part of an hour. I was splitting a pretty wet/green red oak (dropped today), about 15-16 inch diameter, and the engine barely noticed.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #120
Got about an hour of splitting done tonight. Started on first pull and ran absolutely flawlessly after sitting idle for two months!

Looking back, I have a total of roughly 7 hours of run time on the engine now. Will need to double-check the manual's recommendation on time to first oil change.

Mike
 
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