My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
Can someone assist me with the following? The tractor will occasionally not go forward when I press the pedal in the forward direction. It wants to try, but it’s like the clutch isn’t pressing hard enough against the hub. Usually occurs when traveling on an upward incline (doesn’t have to be much of an incline). After fooling with it a few times by going in reverse to level ground and cycling between fwd and rev, it will finally go forward. I mowed for two hours yesterday and this happened four times. When I mowed last week it only happened once, so it’s getting more prevalent.

I also notice that the pedal, when locked in the fwd position will pop out when traveling and not keeping my foot on it.

I have taken pictures of the clutch and direction control related parts for your review (right and left sides in neutral, forward, and reverse). It all seems to be alright to me, but I don’t know for sure.

Thank you for your help.
Lenny
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,402 Posts
Lenny,

It is hard to say for sure without actually seeing it in person, but it sounds like the clutch linkage and/or the brake linkage, is way out of adjustment.

A photo of the little half moon piece with the neutral switch above the forward clutch might help.

Understand one very important thing with these tractors, proper adjustment of the clutches also requires proper adjustment of the brake linkage for everything to work correctly.

An improperly adjusted brake linkage could be your problem, or it could just be the clutch adjustment.

Do you have the original operators manual? Carefully read both the brake and clutch adjustment sections and look at the tractor and learn how the brake linkage interacts with the main clutch rod from the foot pedal.

https://www.gravelymanuals.com/pdf/Pro_G_Op_Man_0299.pdf

Let me know if you have more questions.

Sheldon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
The gap on your fwd clutch when in neutral looks a little bit big for the G series (I believe they called for a smaller gap by then). On the 800 series you could get away with just using the key as a gauge. Anyway if it's been slipping then it might be glazed over. Take it off and run it over some 150 or so grit sandpaper on a flat surface like a table saw, then adjust the gap to factory spec when you reassemble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
Yep loosen the brake band then adjust the clutch per specs in the manual. Take your time getting those clutch arms exactly vertical when the gap is zero. Not like a Hulk tight zero, just zero. Then open to spec with lots of measuring. After that is good on BOTH SIDES, then go to adjusting the brake linkage to get the neutral kick-out and brake grabbing right. Kick-out occurs before the brake band grabs and its more important to get the kick-out right first then deal with when the band grabs.

This all works way better when the tractor is exactly level. Take off the wheels and use jackstands if you can. You can see better and can adjust to exactly level with a bottle jack and shims. Heck for even better vision take off the seatpan as well. I'm just saying if you get it right you don't have to mess with it for a long time.

If you have the patience, use bubble levels...!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,402 Posts
Yep loosen the brake band then adjust the clutch per specs in the manual. Take your time getting those clutch arms exactly vertical when the gap is zero. Not like a Hulk tight zero, just zero. Then open to spec with lots of measuring. After that is good on BOTH SIDES, then go to adjusting the brake linkage to get the neutral kick-out and brake grabbing right. Kick-out occurs before the brake band grabs and its more important to get the kick-out right first then deal with when the band grabs.

This all works way better when the tractor is exactly level. Take off the wheels and use jackstands if you can. You can see better and can adjust to exactly level with a bottle jack and shims. Heck for even better vision take off the seatpan as well. I'm just saying if you get it right you don't have to mess with it for a long time.

If you have the patience, use bubble levels...!
Well that seems a little extreme to me, I pulled my clutches today and lubed the splines and readjusted them in about 20 minutes. Without the use of a feeler gauge.......

But if that works for you, go for it.

Admittedly I know longer have a brake kickout to worry about, but I do have my separate neutral kickout pedal system in the mix.

2463773


2463774


2463775


I developed this because I installed the individual rear wheel brakes and did not like the idea of stomping on reverse to release the forward clutch.

2463777


2463778




2463779

Sheldon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks everyone for your help. I did the clutch adjustment and sanded the clutch pad a little. Checked the brake and it is working properly. Pressing the pedal forward now seems a lot better, a more secure lock. It looks like the clutch gap was too wide. Tested it and so far it works fine. I'll see for sure how it works next week when I run it for two hours cutting grass. I guess when they say, "check the clutches every 100 hours" they mean it. The clutch thickness wears down and causes a wider gap after time.

PS, How does the clutch thickness look? I don't think it needs replaced?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
On the later ones the clutch material is riveted on so you can't accurately gauge how much life is left in it from the outside. When you had it off is when you could check how much longer before it would get down to the rivets. Looks like they've got plenty of life in them though, it's just not a thing where you can go all the way down to the backing plate like one that's glued on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
Oh I think extreme would be to float the tractor in a lake or pond using the lockable gimbal frame you made to establish a true horizontal on the plane of liquid under the influence of gravity. You can't use the ocean or a river as the moving water and wave action makes it hard to lock in true level. Then you could really get those clutch arms perpendicular to the plane of the shafts. Remember to lock the gimbal before you start adjusting...

Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
On the later ones the clutch material is riveted on so you can't accurately gauge how much life is left in it from the outside. When you had it off is when you could check how much longer before it would get down to the rivets. Looks like they've got plenty of life in them though, it's just not a thing where you can go all the way down to the backing plate like one that's glued on.
Glad to hear they've got plenty of life in them. Thanks
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top