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Discussion Starter #1
I have been contemplating installing a hydraulic deck/hitch lift since I acquired this tractor but not really liking the idea of the rear pump install and the cost of all parts and lines. I know that Gravely used the electric pumps (Outboard motor pumps) with two lines a cylinder and a switch. Easy peasy.

What I am looking for is some pictures from someone who has this setup of where the pump is mounted and to what bracket and such. This would be an easy install. I found the electrical diagram but looking for pump mounting pics and where the switch is mounted on the dash?

Second note is that I know that with the traditional hydraulic lift that you have no control to set the lowering height??

If you had the electric lift could you still rig it to use the lift stop so you could set the return deck height?

all ideas and pictures welcome.
 

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Bill,

First thing you should understand is that a GRAVELY deck will not work properly if you use the lift to set the cutting height - it does not matter which lift system you have, the lift is only a lift, the cutting height is adjusted on the deck and the self leveling design of the deck suspension will not work if you do not fully lower the lift.

Which deck do you have?

The 50" deck hangs front the center mount and rides on its back wheels. The wheels have an adjustment to control cut height. It uses a pantograph system to keep the deck level at any rear wheel cut height position selected. None of this will work if the deck is "hanging" from the lift.

The 60" deck rides on 4 wheels on the ground and is "pulled" by the tractor.

I suggest you take a look at the IPL (instructions) for which ever deck you have and learn how it works and how to adjust it properly.

The electric hydraulic lift mounts to the side panel on the right, just behind the gas tank.

Some where I have some model number info other than GRAVELY for a replacement, but will have to dig around to find that for you.

Was your tractor originally manual? What year is it.

The rock shaft under the tractor is different for the electric lift. Older transmission driven full hydro lifts, and manual lifts use the same shaft.

So what you have now may effect what you want to do. Do you have any hydro lift parts now?

Sheldon
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ok, I guess when I mentioned deck height I was talking about lift height in general. I understand how the deck height adjustment works on the "scissor" lift as I call it but was talking about if I were going to use the rear sleeve hitch for cultivator or disc or even a plow blade on the front. I do have the 50" deck and it mows VERY good and even compares or exceeds the quality of my walk behind commercial mower. That is one of the main reasons for going with the rider is the quality of cut and simple height adjustment.

As far as the lift I do not have any parts for the hydraulic lift setup. I know that the rockshaft is shorter on the left side as there is no lift handle to attach. I could even cut mine off and have machine shop put a groove for the E clip and use what I have on that. I found the cylinder, shaft and front support rod on fleebay for $100 complete then I could just add the pump and switch.

Just looking for pics also of the setup. Let me know if you find the info on a replacement setup.

thanks!
 

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A rear cultivator on a G series is an expensive and time consuming add-on. There is a lot more to it than the lift. There is the axle block and the rear hitch to consider. I have a 16G with a manual lift. I use it exclusively to mow.

There are other things to consider before investing in a rear tiller. Except for preparing soil in the spring the rear tiller is almost pointless and a space waster due to the requisite row spacing. Because of this, I use a two wheel tractor with a plow and cultivator. If you have 1/4-1/2 acre allocated to a garden then the rear tiller could be useful. Having said that, a two wheeler will allow more produce to be grown. Something like 30-75% more.

My calculation for row spacing with a 4 wheeler is (tractor track width + cultivator offset/overhang) *2.

The two wheel spacing is something like cultivator width *2.

I recommend that you find a nice 5000 or Pro series 8 hp two wheeler and use that for gardening. I recommend that you find an oil style cultivator as well. The new style is very heavy and doesn't do as nice a job as the old style unless you add more tines. I doubled up on the tines on mine and now it does a much better job than the old style.
 

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Ok, I guess when I mentioned deck height I was talking about lift height in general. I understand how the deck height adjustment works on the "scissor" lift as I call it but was talking about if I were going to use the rear sleeve hitch for cultivator or disc or even a plow blade on the front. I do have the 50" deck and it mows VERY good and even compares or exceeds the quality of my walk behind commercial mower. That is one of the main reasons for going with the rider is the quality of cut and simple height adjustment.

As far as the lift I do not have any parts for the hydraulic lift setup. I know that the rockshaft is shorter on the left side as there is no lift handle to attach. I could even cut mine off and have machine shop put a groove for the E clip and use what I have on that. I found the cylinder, shaft and front support rod on fleebay for $100 complete then I could just add the pump and switch.

Just looking for pics also of the setup. Let me know if you find the info on a replacement setup.

thanks!
OK, you mean can you control the height of a rear liftable hitch? - Yes, either system will do that. The full hydraulic system has a lock position and a float position. The Electric/hydraulic system always locks where you stop it.

I can take a few pictures and look up the info, give me a few days.

Sheldon
 

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Personally, I do not like the electric hydraulic system. It is a compromise and as Sheldon noted, there is no "float". Price out a replacement electric motor for another reason why.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Did not know about the float on the lift. If the electric does not have a float it would be hard to use on about anything. Not really wanting the tiller on the rear due to cost. I have a horse tiller that does fine in the garden. I may just abandon the lift project and just use the original manual lift anyway. I have an extra cradle to make a lift assist with and a set of springs.
 

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Did not know about the float on the lift. If the electric does not have a float it would be hard to use on about anything. Not really wanting the tiller on the rear due to cost. I have a horse tiller that does fine in the garden. I may just abandon the lift project and just use the original manual lift anyway. I have an extra cradle to make a lift assist with and a set of springs.
The Electric system does not need "float".

Float is mechanically built into every GRAVELY attachment except the rear tiller and the center mount blade - don't know that you want float on the center mount blade.

The slide rod that lifts the mower or snow doser allows float.

The two piece push rod that lifts front attachments provides float.

The whole point of the GRAVELY system is that with hydraulic or manual lift, the attachments float by design, the lift does just that - it lifts them. They are all designed for the lift to be ALL the way down during operation.

With the center mount blade down force is desired - it has a sheer pin design on the lift bar.

So the rear tiller remains the only attachment that potentially benefits from float. The rear tiller was discontinued before the electric/hydraulic system was introduced on the G series.

I have never used a rear tiller, so I will not comment on how necessary float is to its operation, but I know there are several members of this forum with rear tillers on electric lift G tractors and they have said it works fine with no float.

After 1994 GRAVELY recommended front mounted plowing or tilling for the riders.

Big advantage to the electric lift - it works without the engine running.

Biggest drawback - the cost of the unit if it fails.

I will take a few pictures when I can.

Sheldon
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Gotcha Sheldon. Makes sense now on the float. I learn something new every time I get on the site. Thanks!
 

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Complete new electric pump with reservoir is available all over eBay for less than $200 way way cheaper than Gravelys price.

Float is extremely important when using a center mounted grader blade. You need to use the down pressure to cut but float is used to float the blade up over the pile of stuff that is in front of the blade to feather it out. Such as using down to move a pile of gravel but float to spread it.

Jason
 
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