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Going to be working on my grandpa's retaining wall on the lake and was thinking that it would be nicer to bring the tractor and cart then a wheel Barrow (always looking for a reason to use the tractor) going to be hauling basket ball sized rocks over and over and was wondering what just the tractor weighs no deck on. Mine is a briggs vanguard 23hp repower so with aluminum block probably slightly lighter than factor specs but factory specs would do . Cant seem to find a number anywhere.


Also side note while posting hope all of my friends here at the site are safe happy and healthy during this virus garbage. Hopefully all at home playing with our tractors.

Mike

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Shipping weight of 8199KTs is listed as being 935 lbs. Yes, your Gravely, and trailer would make hauling loads of rocks more fun than a wheelbarrow. You would be able to haul more per load too, making the job go more quickly.

I hope everybody stays safe as well. I have been playing with my tractors too. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Shipping weight of 8199KTs is listed as being 935 lbs. Yes, your Gravely, and trailer would make hauling loads of rocks more fun than a wheelbarrow. You would be able to haul more per load too, making the job go more quickly.

I hope everybody stays safe as well. I have been playing with my tractors too. :)
Thanks for the quick reply.

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To steal a phrase that I picked up in the Miller welding forum: "900 pounds of awesome!" :)
 

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Right you are, John!(y)
I love the old stuff. I have an Airco Heliwelder 300, made by Miller. Vintage 1963 technology. The thing weighs 900 lbs, mostly due to some honking huge transformers in the base. It's chock fully of beefy technology: Huge copper rotary switches, massive tungsten electrodes, a bank of selenium rectifiers that look like the ones in a 1950 Otis elevator. It draws 105 amps of 220V single phase, and sources 300 amps of welding current. It still welds beautifully. Reminds me of my gravelys :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The old stuff was built to last i dont think in 50 years the stuff thats being built new now 2020 will still be around cheaply made crap. However some of the 1950 stuff may still be around lol

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At 900 lbs. that has to be a serious machine, John. A "keeper" for sure. Mrgoodwrench, you're absolutely right, the old stuff was made to last, and it does.
My Onan CCK generators come to mind. Heavy, overbuilt (the gauge of the copper wire used for the windings is amazing), and they loaf along at 1,800 rpm vs. 3,600 rpm of new generators. My oldest with the enclosure), built in November 1975 is 5,000 watts, and the newer one is 6,500 watts.
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I agree Tracktortag. The Onan and Gravely companies seem to have had similar design philosophies. Make it strong and overbuild it a little so it is very reliable. I also have a couple of Onan generators. My 1963 2LK highlights this. Who else would make a 2 kilowatt generator that weighs nearly 400 lbs and call it portable. 😂 The difference is it can run at it's rated output forever and it still runs perfectly 57 years later.Gotta love the four pole generators and their 1800 rpm running speed, it is soooo much quieter.
 

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Who else would make a 2 kilowatt generator that weighs nearly 400 lbs and call it portable. 😂

LOL, that's funny!


The difference is it can run at it's rated output forever and it still runs perfectly 57 years later.Gotta love the four pole generators and their 1800 rpm running speed, it is soooo much quieter.
Yes, absolutely. I remember the (younger) electrician shaking his head as he was watching his meter while we test ran the 5K after he wired it up to the house electrical panel. Finally, I asked him if there was a problem. He asked "WHAT make is this..?" (I had told him earlier on). I said "Onan". He shook his head again, and said "I cant' believe it, you could watch TV with this!" (without blowing it up), referring to it's clean, and steady power output. I felt relieved more than anything else at that point, but it's a testament to how well these old generators were built.
 
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