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gravely novice
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Discussion Starter #1
I need to mount three new tires/wheels for my C10A on two piece rims. I am having a terrible time with this seemingly simple task. I soaped the rims of the tires but still cannot get them onto the rims. I am trying to use the tube to press the beads on but the tube keeps coming out between the split rims. What am I missing?
 

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I'm not familiar with your specific rims (so it could be different for you), but I believe you put the tire with the tube in place, but not inflated between the two halves, bolt the halves together, then fill up the tube to get the tire seated.
 

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Right

Get tire seated more or less on one rim. Start with the rim with the hole in it.
Inflate tube just enough so it doesn't lie flat. It should still be floppy.
Gently stuff tube into tire. Align valve with hole and pull it through.
Push other rim into tire. Use soap if needed. Don't worry about getting the bead seated, all you're doing is getting the rim halves to come together without pinching the tube.
Once the rim halves are together, put in 3 sets of bolts.
Inflate.

A small amount of air in the tube actually helps it not get stuck between the rims, because it's trying to assume a round shape. But you only want a little.

Take your time. If you want, take something like a popsicle stick and gently push between the rim halves before it's socked down. That will help keep the tube from getting in there.
 

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Use long bolts/nuts as pilots to pull everything together if you have to. Two long threaded rods make mounting the tires on the tractor much easier. Slide the tire onto the mounted rods then align the third hole and start a bolt. Don't tighten until all three bolts are started as wheels don't always align exactly right you may have to fool around with it a little..
 

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Only put bolts in every other hole to bolt the two sections together. The other holes will be needed to mount the assembly.
 

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gravely novice
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks to all. I finally got them together after reading the posts and thinking about it a bit. One of my tubes was a bit smaller than the other two and kept getting caught in the seam between the two pieces. A bit of air helped. It also helps to have a valve stem remover when one is doing this job. And patience.

I am still not super happy with the way that the valve stems protrude from the rims. Next time. RG
 

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I am still not super happy with the way that the valve stems protrude from the rims. Next time. RG
I'm pretty sure the 4.80x8 tubes being made nowadays are designed for a one-piece wheel, with the stem hole at a different offset. The stem ends up looking cockeyed coming out of the hole in a split rim. I've tried tubes from several vendors and they all have the same problem. The probably all come from the same plant in China :(

The good news is that filling it with air will stretch the tube so that it looks and works ok when inflated. Still not totally satisfying.
 

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For new owners it easy to forget, at least with some of the older lugged tires, that the arrow on the side wall is there to show that the tire was designed to roll forward in that direction. So the valve stem should for easiest inflation goes on the outside with the "V" tread facing forward as intended by the tire people.
 

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gravely novice
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Discussion Starter #9
One more bit of information about the wheels. It seems like the narrower black wheels that are on the old L's are no longer available new. If you buy a new white wheel from Richards or EBAY, it will be the slightly wider wheel originally used on the Kohler-powered tractors. Works just fine on the old 4.80 x 8 tires though.
 

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I'm pretty sure the wider wheels started showing up on L models in the early to mid '60s. I've seen too many machines like that to believe they were all retrofitted with later model wheels.

The really old tires were 4.00x8. Those made more sense on the narrow wheels. But the 4.80s work fine as well, on either the narrow or wide wheels. I don't know anyplace to get real 4.00 tires.

Most of my machines have been updated with wider wheels. The exceptions are the '43 and the '50. If I ever get around to restoring the '41, I'll probably keep the narrow wheels there too.
 
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