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Well fortunately not using the new welding gloves I just bought, I had a different set of leather gloves on that I normally use for grinding. They've stopped the wire brush cup a few times when it's kicked back but the grinder wheel went through them pretty quick.
 

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I tend to go without gloves when using a bench grinder or drill press,too often I've had the glove get snagged and suck my hand into the spinning wheel or drill chuck..

Seems either way your bound to get wounded !..:(
 

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Yikes, sorry to hear about your incident, I hope it heals quickly. I was going to mention the same thing as T-H. I've heard enough stories that I get nervous about wearing gloves with spinning equipment. Something that touches/grabs your bare finger might just cut you. But if it grabs your glove and pulls it into the equipment, it could be much, much worse.

Angle grinders are awesome tools, but they're scary. Stories about wire-wheels grabbing shirts and pulling the wheel into the user's body are scary. Mine (Harbor Freight cheapie) has a switch that can lock-on. I now wish I'd bought one with a paddle switch (?), the kind that turn off if you let go. Please be careful, I'm glad it wasn't worse!
 

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:ditto:

My dad is a retired machinist (and later a toolmaker), never wore his wedding ring, always wore short-sleeve shirts while working. I never saw him wear gloves while doing anything at home.

I, however, do nothing without wearing gloves. Of course, I'm just a weekend warrior with this stuff...

Mike
 

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In my neighborhood, we have a dress code for working in the shop. So I wear a tie when using any power equipment.:hide:
 

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gloves, rings, any kind of jewelry, long sleeves and untucked shirts were always frowned upon when using mills, lathes, drill presses, saws, etc. back in the day
Add long hair to the list too!...

Back around 1976 I was a teen aged hippie with "Jesus hair",as my dad called it--one day I was tuning up my '63 VW Beetle and decided to use a timing light to see how close the "static timing" method was compared to the strobe light,and a gust of wind blew my hair into the spinning generator pulley..
It ripped a lot out,and part of my scalp with it !:tango_face_surprise

Two days later after the scalped spot stopped weeping blood,I went with my dad and got a "buzz cut"...he had a grin on his face the whole time,going there,watching my hair get chopped off,and driving back home..:tango_face_grin:
My friends were also quite amused,I got a lot of ribbing for getting my hair cut like a marine..:tango_face_sad:


Another dangerous this to have on is a hoodie with draw strings to tighten the hood around your head..had those get sucked into a spinning pulley or belt or engine before and was lucky they were only ripped clean out of the hoodie instead of yanking my face into the spinning machinery!..
 

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I wore snug fitting Mechanix type gloves when working my 20 yrs in diesel truck and trailer wreck rebuild shops. I'd buy the real leather copies of them after they became available.

Never had a safety issue when wearing them. Had plenty of injuries when I wasn't. Usually when the little voice said "You should be wearing gloves for this" and I ignored it.
 

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Good point about the strings on the hooded sweatshirts. I've noticed that a lot of those, especially ones for kids, no longer even come with strings.

That hair story is hilarious, and predictable. Must have hurt like mad (scalp and pride).

Mike
 

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I was lucky the hair ripped out fast,otherwise my face & head would have been pulled into the spinning pulley!...which has a slot cut in the outer sheave to allow a screwdriver to be inserted in the slot and wedged against a generator case bolt so you can loosen the nut holding the two pulley halves and add or remove shims to tighten the fan belt--that would have made a nice neat grinder..:eek:

I know a guy who was killed while driving his MG one chilly fall day long ago--it had no convertible top,and he decided to wear a scarf so his neck wouldn't be cold..
The long scarf was blowing around and ended up getting snagged on one of the hub cap "spinners",and he was yanked right out of the car ,and it ran him over!..

I know another guy who had a long hillbilly beard ,a biker,who owned a Harley--one day he had the bike up on a milk crate and he was revving the engine up ,and his beard went in the chain...he lived,but his face was never quite the same,it was all scar tissue where the beard used to be..:eck16:
 

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They,be come a long way with gloves. I like the tight elastic type with the rubber like substance on the palms and fingers for doing disassembly and such. (Got use to wearing them working on automatic rotary punches) without them you'd have a lot of metal slivers in your fingers. Also good disasembling nasty grubby equipment,tight enough that you can still grip small fasteners. For iron working and welding ,leather gloves can't be beat. For sheet metal fabrication, I never wore gloves and I'd get sliced once in a while, but with those tight elastic type with the rubber fingers and palms, I'd wear them now. I actually wear that type for weeding the flower beds.
 

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As a kid, I worked on my dad's 8n. I knelt down between the rear arms to get something that fell off the seat. Next I know, my t shirt is snagged by the PTO. I managed to get my elbows up just in time and they braced against the rear of the differential enough to just get me a real red rose mark on my stomach as the t shirt split up the seams and ended up as a spinning wad on the pto. Never told parents about that one, but still gives me shivers after 50 years.
 

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Well certainly loose clothing and long hair are a danger when working around spinning equipment. Not sure I'd ever run the grinder without the gloves on though, pretty sure it saved me a much deeper cut. I also learned to wear the leather apron when using a wire wheel. Those flying steel bristles will stick in you pretty good without protection.
 

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:ditto:

I can see how gloves could get caught on a wire wheel on a bench grinder, but not on a grinding stone.

I've worn gloves using both, and have been saved by the gloves multiple times. I was working in a metal fabrication shop at the time.

I never had an issue with the bristles, don't recall ever wearing an apron, but that sounds like a good idea (assuming no loose strings to get caught).

I do believe I've had a glove snagged by a drill press. No major injury, but that gets your attention.

Worst injury I got from that job was a hernia which required surgery. How many 18-year-olds do you know that had to have a bleeping hernia repaired???

Second worst injury from that job was the series of burns on my forearms from bumping into the brass I was soldering, but that was my fault for not being careful enough.

Mike
 

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I had a double hernia at age 4-1/2!...
I picked up two heavy objects,a large cast iron frying pan,after I saw Curly on the 3 Stooges making hotcakes on one--my mom said I wanted pankakes and nearly had a stroke when she saw me lugging it around....and a day or so later my older brother teased me ,saying I was too weak to lift a 50 lb elevator weight ,my dad had a pair of them he used to add weight to the back of his station wagon in the winter..
I picked it up over my head with great strain,and fell over backwards..(but I did it!).

I felt OK after the initial scare,but the next day my gut was hurting bad,my parents took me to Burbank hospital just up the street and I had to have surgery..
This led to some life long complications..

I've had wire bristles end up in my chest more than once,funny thing is you don't feel them right away usually,its not until an infection starts and then you know one is there--I have had a few go in 3/4" and I had to use pliers to extract them..
I had a wire brush on a 9" grinder come apart while removing flaky rust on a truck frame,it may have been spinning over its rated RPMs ..

In the auto parts store's machine shop I got some injuries--one day a u-joint I was pressing out had the bearing cap shatter and shards imbedded in my belly button area,didn't feel it till the next morning..
Another day I had a wheel bearing I was splitting with a chisel shatter and some metal stuck in my eye,had to go that dug out with a needle..the shard went right behind the safety glasses..(and I'm guilty of not wearing any as often as I should still !)..

Luckily it did only minor permanent damage to it..took me 6 months to see good again out of that eye..

It's easy to get wounded working on things and using power & hand tools..seems like I get at least one good wound every time I attempt to fix or build something and I'm pretty careful..
 
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