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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok looking around for a GMC Sierra 1500 2007-2012, I have seen alot of 4x4's for sale that had everything I am looking for as far as fully loaded, 20 inch wheels, leather, and some chrome accessories. I won't be doing any offroading at all and at most will pull a horse trailer sometimes. I won't be pulling a horse trailer that often though as I havent even bought the trailer yet.

I have always heard to stay away from 4x4's cause when they break they are more expensive to fix. But if I buy one that hasnt been offroaded at all or very little, will that even matter as far as it breaking anything 4x4 related? I would prefer to buy a 4x2 but if I found the one I was looking for that had all the options I wanted and also the right color and it was a 4x4 and the price was right, that might be a can't pass up deal lol. Also, what about insurance rates 4x2 vs 4x4? That would play into my decision also.

thoughts guys?
 

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I am strictly a 4x4 guy, but that's due to the snow and ice we tend to get here in Ohio. Also a big help if you find yourself pulling a trailer into a muddy/wet area. If you'll be staying on pavement/gravel and don't have to drive much in snow I don't see where you really have to have the 4x4.

As far as extra maintenance, you'll have an extra differential and set of U-joints to maintain, plus the transfer case. Typically it's just the routine fluid changes, but they are there. Bearing wise it's no different at the wheels in my case just a sealed hub unit vs. spindles (it's an S-10; I actually prefer the hubs as they're maintenance free).

Does the 2500 have a solid front axle or hubs, CV shafts, and independent suspension? I'm thinking it's similar in style to the S-10, where the front axle is quite similar to front wheel drive cars. This means that everything is engaged from the wheels into the front differential; the engaging mechanisms are contained in the transfer case and front differential.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am strictly a 4x4 guy, but that's due to the snow and ice we tend to get here in Ohio. Also a big help if you find yourself pulling a trailer into a muddy/wet area. If you'll be staying on pavement/gravel and don't have to drive much in snow I don't see where you really have to have the 4x4.
yeah here in SC won't be doing all that and I try to avoid mud at all cost, **** even water spots or water holes, ect. Also checked on the ins and they are within dollars of each other with state farm.

so basically will come down to what i think as far as maintence cost, ect
 

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Whoops.. was editing while you were replying... re-read above!! :fing32:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am strictly a 4x4 guy, but that's due to the snow and ice we tend to get here in Ohio. Also a big help if you find yourself pulling a trailer into a muddy/wet area. If you'll be staying on pavement/gravel and don't have to drive much in snow I don't see where you really have to have the 4x4.

As far as extra maintenance, you'll have an extra differential and set of U-joints to maintain, plus the transfer case. Typically it's just the routine fluid changes, but they are there. Bearing wise it's no different at the wheels in my case just a sealed hub unit vs. spindles (it's an S-10; I actually prefer the hubs as they're maintenance free).

Does the 2500 have a solid front axle or hubs, CV shafts, and independent suspension? I'm thinking it's similar in style to the S-10, where the front axle is quite similar to front wheel drive cars. This means that everything is engaged from the wheels into the front differential; the engaging mechanisms are contained in the transfer case and front differential.
not sure about anything to do with the 2500's
 

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My bad... I read it wrong.. same still applies I believe. Hopefully someone more familiar with the 1500s comes along soon to confirm/correct this.
 

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The GM 2500 4x4 does have the independent front suspension. Ford and Dodge still use solid axles on there 4x4 3/4 ton trucks.
 

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aceman
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if you look at towing rating the 4x4 are rated low in capacity I tow heavy from 4000 to 8000 2wd is the way to go ,there will be alot that will disagree but it,s only because the lower center of gravatee and is lot more stable then a 4x4 also wind drag is a factor but this is only when your towing like i do mostly long trips over 1000km or 600 miles
 

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Deere 330 Killer
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I would say that if you are going to buy a truck, and you want to tow with it, you should get 4WD. Even if you only use it once in a while, you will be happy to have it when you need it.
 

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..
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Fuel costs on a 4x4 are higher. 2wd gets better mileage, period. Less spinning parts, less resistance. If you have never needed, nor envision the need for, 4 wheel drive; no need to waste the money on the purchase, or the fuel and maintenance.
 

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Ok looking around for a GMC Sierra 1500 2007-2012, I have seen alot of 4x4's for sale that had everything I am looking for as far as fully loaded, 20 inch wheels, leather, and some chrome accessories. I won't be doing any offroading at all and at most will pull a horse trailer sometimes. I won't be pulling a horse trailer that often though as I havent even bought the trailer yet.

I have always heard to stay away from 4x4's cause when they break they are more expensive to fix. But if I buy one that hasnt been offroaded at all or very little, will that even matter as far as it breaking anything 4x4 related? I would prefer to buy a 4x2 but if I found the one I was looking for that had all the options I wanted and also the right color and it was a 4x4 and the price was right, that might be a can't pass up deal lol. Also, what about insurance rates 4x2 vs 4x4? That would play into my decision also.

thoughts guys?
I would go for a 4x4. They aren't that much more expensive to fix trust me. I am strictly a 4x4 guy also because of the fact if I do need it it is there. I live in snow and mud too. I haven't had a non 4x4 in a while but my sister has a 2005 Ford F350 diesel 2wd and it has cheaper insurance then my 2005 King Ranch F250 4x4 but my insurance is high as I do drive CDL (my new to me 2000 Flatbed ford F650) and I have alot of vehicles the ones in my signature aren't all I wouldn't be able to name them all but not all are insured or even running. The GMCs are pretty good trucks as far as I have seen my brother has a Chevy Silverado 2500 with a huge lift kit and 40 inch tires and it is a 2010. I am just more a Ford man.
Trav
 

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I like towing with 4x4's because of the low range in the transfer case. If I'm backing up a long driveway or maneuvering in a tight spot, I can engage the 4-Low (I don't bother locking in the hubs) and let the truck idle along. Theoretically, a person could add an underdrive gearbox to a 2wd truck to accomplish the same thing, without sacrificing gas mileage.
 

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The majority of those new Chevy's will probably have the push button 4x4, which works fine as long as it's used regularly. They fail when soccer moms don't use it for 3 years straight and expect it to start working when everything's rusted or gummed together... I would stay away from anything with a huge lift and big tires, it puts a ton of added strain on the front end basically halving the life of front end parts.. Plus you have to deal with extra heavy tires that kill your ratios, are 2x-3x more money to replace, and throw any hope of fuel economy out of the window.

Around here 4x4 is almost a must if you live outside of town, even inside during the winter because we get just enough snow to overwhelm the plows... In the spring it's wet enough driving through the yard in 2wd will get you spinning, have to use 4x4 to not leave huge ruts. It's nice to have even if you're moving stuff and backing through someones yard to their door. I think the biggest factor with 4x4 for you is the loss of fuel economy.
 

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If you have no plans to ever go offroad, 4 wheeling, or hit snow/mud regularly, I would opt for the 2WD....this coming from a guy who only buys 4x4's. The 2WD will be cheaper in initial costs, cheaper in gas, probably insurance, and will have heavier payload due to, as mentioned, lower center of gravity, but more of it weighs less than a 4x4 so the gross vehicle weight will allow for a heavier trailer. The newer 1/2 tons have somewhere in neighborhood 7000# tow rating I think with the 5.3L. Overall, GM's "hard" 4x4 parts are pretty bulletproof, i.e. transfer case, diffys', it's the electronics that go out and they can be expensive.
It's a lot of personal preference. If you get a 4x4 for a killer deal, then jump on it, but get what you want and what meets your needs.
 

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i tell you my friend and i have a company truck, ford f250 2wd diesel and we get around 25-30 mpg
 
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