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Third Technician
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I purchased a house on .66 acres in November that was covered with mature 20 foot tall sumac trees. The "nice" kind with the red berries at the top that's non-toxic to the touch. I hate them.

I proceeded to cut them down and chip them up and then winter set on. Once spring came, my yard turned into a sumac forest. Its all I can do to mow them down once a week or so. The **** things grow about 3 times faster than my lawn. Right now they are about 8 inches tall and the rest of my lawn is just about ready for a mowing.

I was told that constant cutting would take care of the problem, but with a 6 month old, I don't have the time to mow twice a week.

What should I do to get rid of them? I just sprayed them with an application of bleach/water this morning and am going to wait and see what that does.

The guy at the Lowes in town said that he has used Round up on them and it worked great and stopped them from coming up again because of how it works its way into the roots. Have any of you guys had luck with this? What are your opinions on the product itself. There is a lot of conflicting opinions on the net about how safe it really is and so on and so forth.

One major issue is a large clump of the new sumac trees is directly over where my well is. I'm not too keen on spraying that stuff when I know it could easily get into my drinking water.....

I guess I would be looking for an eventual permanent sollution and not just something I have to use a few times a year. I'd just rather they were gone completely.

Thanks in advance

Tim
 

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Keep at this year, next year there should be nearly nothing, I cleared 5 acres of the stuff years ago. Kept it mowed for a few years and it is gone, the bad is bittersweet and poison ivy are taking over, I think they feed on the dying roots.
I do my brush hoggin in august most of the growing is over for the season. There is not enough time for the brush to replenish it's reserve to over winter and alot of it dies off.
 

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That kind of sumac is harmless... I know some people that make tea with the red berries... The sumac with white flowers is the bad stuff....

The drupes of the genus Rhus are ground into a deep-red or purple powder used as a spice in Middle Eastern cuisine to add a lemony taste to salads or meat.[5] In Arab cuisine, it is used as a garnish on meze dishes such as hummus and is added on salads in the Levant. In Iranian (Persian and Kurdish) cuisine, sumac is added to rice or kebab. In Turkish cuisine, for example, it is added to salad-servings of kebabs and lahmacun.
In North America, the Smooth Sumac (Rhus glabra) and the Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina) are sometimes used to make a beverage termed "sumac-ade," "Indian lemonade" or "rhus juice". This drink is made by soaking the drupes in cool water, rubbing them to extract the essence, straining the liquid through a cotton cloth and sweetening it. Native Americans also used the leaves and drupes of the Smooth and Staghorn Sumacs combined with tobacco in traditional smoking mixtures.
Species including the Fragrant Sumac (Rhus aromatica), the Littleleaf Sumac (R. microphylla), the Skunkbush Sumac (R. trilobata), the Smooth Sumac and the Staghorn Sumac are grown for ornament, either as the wild types or as cultivars.
The leaves of certain sumacs yield tannin (mostly pyrogallol), a substance used in vegetable tanning. Leather tanned with sumac is flexible, light in weight, and light in color. One type of leather made with sumac tannins is morocco leather.
Sumac was used as a treatment for half a dozen different ailments in medieval medicine, primarily in Islamic countries (where sumac was more readily available than in Europe). An 11th century shipwreck off the coast of Rhodes, excavated by archeologists in the 1970s, contained commercial quantities of sumac drupes. These could have been intended for use as medicine, or as a culinary spice, or as a dye.[8]
Dried sumac wood fluoresces under long-wave ultraviolet radiation, commonly known as black light.
Toxicodendron diversilobum) and Poison sumac (Rhus vernix, syn. Toxicodendron vernix), have the allergen urushiol and can cause severe allergic reactions.
 

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Regular round-up will not work .. You need a Brush killer type ..

I had LOTS of those nasty dirty Sumac trees on my property when I bought it ..

They grow like weeds ,, and when they get tall .. they are VERY weak and high winds will take them down .. I know this from experience :fing20:

I cut all mine down and ground down the stumps .. well guess what .. they STILL grew back. Once I picked up my bob cat loader/back hoe .. I dug them all out .. which did the trick

BUT I still get new ones growing here and there ..and just yank them out before they take off ..

They will grow darn near anywhere too .. worse then Mulberry trees :banghead3
 

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Mowing them will get rid of them eventually. Once a week is probably enough. I had a bunch of mature ones on a rocky hill. I just kept cutting them back, and the next year they didn't come back. I get the occasional one, which I clip while it's small, but they're getting more and more rare.
The ones I had took a chain saw to cut down - they were like small trees. And yes, they do grow like weeds. I monitor my property for growth taking over, which it keeps trying to do. My Cub with sickle bar is my best friend out there!
We get lots of grape vine, and various types of pricker plants. Nasty stuff, that.
 

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Third Technician
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the responces guys.
I think I'll keep at it with the mower and pulling them out manually this year. I'll see where that gets me in a year or two before I bring out the chemicals.

Its not like they are an eye sore or anything like that. I just don't like them and want them gone in the safest of manners. Guess its time to go and rip them all out and make sure the stumps I left are low enough for me to get in there with the deere and keep at it that way.

Tim
 

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Regular round-up will not work .. You need a Brush killer type ..
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That's sure news to me. This sumac plant was killed with 2 table spoons of regular round-up mixed at a 5 percent solution.

The 6 inch diameter walnut tree stump pictured takes just a bit more of the same 5 percent solution.

Application method and timing is everything.



 

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Regular round-up will not work .. You need a Brush killer type ..
********************************************************
That's sure news to me. This sumac plant was killed with 2 table spoons of regular round-up mixed at a 5 percent solution.

The 6 inch diameter walnut tree stump pictured takes just a bit more of the same 5 percent solution.

Application method and timing is everything.

I guess your rite .. I mixed some up in a sprayer .. and hit it pretty good .. it wilted a bit ..but just came rite back .. :fing20:

I have used the brush killer stuff also .. which did work better .. especially where it was coming up in a drainage ditch that I have filled in with rock. And could not get to the roots
 

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Is the wood good for firewood? I ask because my mom has about a dozen LARGE sumac trees that I need to cut down. Biggest might be 12" in dia.
 

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I don't think so.

As fast as that stuff grows... it's a pretty soft wood... and would burn too fast. I don't know as it has a lot of volatile oils/sap that would make it 'dangerous' to burn, but... I wouldn't think that it'd be "good" firewood...
 

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She would be burning it in a fireplace more for looks than heat.
 

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Third Technician
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Just an update:
the bleach I sprayed seems to be doing the trick. Leaves are turning yellow and curling up.
Going to hit em with another heavy application tonight when I get home.
I think if I just keep this up for a year or two I can manage without bringing out the heavy chemicals. Going by with a sprayer is much quicker and much less work than getting out the weed wacker and taking them out that way.

I just don't like the idea of that stuff near my drinking water.

On the topic of burning the wood.....
I read online that some forms of sumac contain an irritant that makes you itch like crazy. I think its in poison sumac. Either way, they said you shouldn't burn it because the same irritant gets in the smoke and then into your lungs.
Does the type with the red berries contain this stuff? I have a large pile I was planning on burning come fall in a bon fire and would hate to find out the hard way that I did something I shouldn't have.

Thanks for the help and suggestions.


Tim
 
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