My Tractor Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I filled my 455 with diesel during the fall because I had a great deal of leaves to mulch--I don't think it was the winter blend. I've started it since then but when I tried to start it after several days of -20 degrees fahrenheit temps (then a warm up to the mid 20s) it won't start. I looked in the tank and the diesel looked like jello. Did it gel?

1) How could I have prevented this if I don't have a heated garage?
2) How can I liquify the gelled fuel if the temperature doesn't get any higher?

thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,026 Posts
You could have either filled it with winter-blend diesel or added an additive that prevents gelling. Winter-blend (used to be called #1 usually isn't available at pumps in the upper midwest until late fall or early winter though. I had the same issue. I filled cans in October with off-road diesel and it apparently was not winter-blend. It gelled when our temps got down under -20 recently. Liquified again when we got back warmer.

As to your #2 question I think the only answer is warmer temps. You could possibly point a heat source at the tractor (in a safe way) and get it liquified again, then add an additive or mix with winter-blend.

Rob
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
280 Posts
I filled my 455 with diesel during the fall because I had a great deal of leaves to mulch--I don't think it was the winter blend. I've started it since then but when I tried to start it after several days of -20 degrees fahrenheit temps (then a warm up to the mid 20s) it won't start. I looked in the tank and the diesel looked like jello. Did it gel?

1) How could I have prevented this if I don't have a heated garage?
2) How can I liquify the gelled fuel if the temperature doesn't get any higher?

thanks
Rob, my Kubota is my first diesel and I was concerned about how it would do in deep cold. Somebody in another forum recommended some stuff called Opti-Lube XD and presented some scholarly research indicating it's among the best products of its type:

http://www.jatonkam35s.com/DeuceTechnicalManuals/Diesel_fuel_additive_test.pdf

So far, I've started the Kubota one morning at -18*F (and about -50*F windchill) and it started right up, no hesitation. I don't know if the Opti-Lube can take credit for that, but as cheap as it is, I guess I won't experiment with not using it in winter.

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00MV8HK1Q/ref=oh_aui_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,377 Posts
Well when I got my BX25D I asked some guys that depend on their diesel engines no matter what the temp is. Three were farmers and one has a trucking operation. They recommended so I got it and haven't had any problems at all. I know a lot of folks swear by PS or some other brands, and I do have any other experience with them. Just know the Howes works for me. Here is an article that breaks down the various products. https://www.fuelsystemguide.com/best-diesel-anti-gel-additive-for-your-fuel-tank/

Here is what is recommended for already gelled fuel.
In order to Thaw Frozen Fuel Filters:

Remove filters.
Empty any liquid or gel.
Fill fuel filters with 50% CleanBoost® Diesel Rescue Emergency De-Gel™
Fill the remaining 50% with diesel fuel.
Re-install fuel filters.
Start engine and allow to idle until warm.

And a link to another article about the subject. https://fuelandfriction.com/trucking-pro/thaw-gelled-diesel-fuel-in-an-emergency/

MikeC
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,196 Posts
As a general rule I am against additives, but if your already gelled diesel 911 should do the trick. Along with a new fuel filter.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,026 Posts
As a general rule I am against additives, but if your already gelled diesel 911 should do the trick. Along with a new fuel filter.
Or just don't start it until it warms up out and the fuel liquifies again. My x758 started right up after the cold spell passed us by last week.

But, yeah, if you HAVE to get it running again during the cold and you can't heat the overall area around the whole tractor then I'm sure there are various hoops you have to jump through.

Rob
 

·
Parts collector
88 Dodge Snowfiter, 93 Dodge diesel, 02 Durango, 01 Electra, 02 Sportster, 2000 Dodge diesel 5 speed
Joined
·
5,097 Posts
Look up a product called Power Service Diesel 911.
I agree with that. put a torpedo heater on it and warm it up. then put the recommended amount of 911 in to thin out the mix and keep it from gelling. I had thesame problem with my truck at -10 a few years back. pulled the filter and saw gel, heated it dumped out 1/4 of the fuel then put the 911 in after i put it in the tank also and put a torpedo heater aimed under the truck. It fired up in an hr and stayed running.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
556 Posts
I use Stanadyne in the winter whether the fuel I buy is supposed to be winter mix or not. They have a winter version that only has the anti gelling components in it but it is sometimes hard to find locally. The regular version has some other stuff in it that opinions vary on whether you want them in your motor. Haven't had an issue since even with machines left out and not run for extended periods.

Dealing with a gelled fuel system sucks especially if its on a machine you cant go at with a torch, heat gun or even a hair dryer. Can you move it somewhere warm for a few days to ungel it and then treat it?
 

·
Enginerd - DieselDork
Joined
·
832 Posts
I filled my 455 with diesel during the fall because I had a great deal of leaves to mulch--I don't think it was the winter blend. I've started it since then but when I tried to start it after several days of -20 degrees fahrenheit temps (then a warm up to the mid 20s) it won't start. I looked in the tank and the diesel looked like jello. Did it gel?

1) How could I have prevented this if I don't have a heated garage?
2) How can I liquify the gelled fuel if the temperature doesn't get any higher?

thanks
1) Try to plan your fuelings so that you can fill up in late October/early Nov when most midwest stations have gone to a winter blend. Get an additive to mix with the fuel if it's going to sit most of the winter. Not sure if anyone makes a block heater for these engines, or an oil pan heater small enough. I'm sure something's out there.

2) Sometimes, something as simple as a 60W work light can provide enough heat to keep things OK. Set it on the ground under the tractor and throw a tarp over the tractor, in the garage. You'll have to wait a while, but it'll warm up. You can also just do this when the garage gets cold and you think you're going to have to use your tractor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
754 Posts
1) Try to plan your fuelings so that you can fill up in late October/early Nov when most midwest stations have gone to a winter blend. Get an additive to mix with the fuel if it's going to sit most of the winter. Not sure if anyone makes a block heater for these engines, or an oil pan heater small enough. I'm sure something's out there.

2) Sometimes, something as simple as a 60W work light can provide enough heat to keep things OK. Set it on the ground under the tractor and throw a tarp over the tractor, in the garage. You'll have to wait a while, but it'll warm up. You can also just do this when the garage gets cold and you think you're going to have to use your tractor.
Kat's makes all kinds of heaters for engines Kat's
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,741 Posts
On my tractor the fuel tank and battery sit side by side - I use a battery warmer wrapped around the battery, I have this wired with a 3 way plug along with a battery tender, and the block heater a- this way the battery is warm, the fuel is warm and the block is warm.
To take advantage of this I tent the entire engine including the fuel tank, battery and fuel filter with heavy movers blanket and I wrap it underneath. Then I tent the tractor with a tarp and stake it down. With this system my IR temp gun shows that I keep the tank above freezing and the tractor starts instantly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
Years ago I bought a used 75 Mercedes 240 D. Great deal I couldn't pass up. Owner, friend of the family. Took it from his heated garage to pick up a client, drove to a restaurant in -20 below weather. Hour later it wouldn't start. 20 mile cab fare, tow to the dealer, ect. Fuel jelled. He wanted the POS gone.

Block heaters and it had one, are great. But don't help when your not by an electrical plug. And the fuel has jelled in the tank.

Owned it for 10 years. The dealer said to mix no more than 10% reg gas to the #2 diesel to prevent fuel gelling. Yes it worked.

I don't know if I would do that today on a newer diesel. I did learn that kerosene is the same as #1 diesel. On a winter mix I was told they mix #1 and #2. When at a 1/4 tank. I used to buy 2 gallons of kerosene, dump it in and fill up with #2. If the station had #1 and #2 I'd go that route. If no #1, I'd do the gas-diesel mix.

I always wondered about putting an electric blanket with a tarp over it . All great ideas on getting it warmed up.

The other thing I learned is what weight oil you have in it. They have to spin over fairly fast to start. Think I used 10-40W in it back then. I was down a quart on minus 0 deg winter day. I keep my oil outside in a shed. Grabbed a Q of 10-40 and try'd to pour it in. Came out like glue. So much for the 10W when cold eh? Got a Q of straight 20W and it poured fine.

I always change oil in the spring and fall. 6 months apart. Fall got the 20W.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,283 Posts

·
blinged out
Joined
·
1,723 Posts
I've been using howes year round for yrs. and never had any problem! I started using it for the lubricity additive to help the longevity of my 6.5 pump! it now has 450,000KM probably the only 95 chev with an original pump!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,196 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Don't you hate when that happens?
Had it happen to my semi-tractor ONCE! I came home for Thanksgiving one year, not knowing that the temps were going to fall so low, and filled my tanks down south. Came time to go back out and she would start but, anything over idle, and she would quit. I learned a lesson that day!

My 430 had a block heater. The glow-plugs never worked (as far as I can remember) so, when the temp dropped below ~40deg, I plugged it in. I could walk into the (detatched, unheated/uninsulated) garage on a -10deg day and feel the heat radiating off of the tractor. I never had a problem with gelled fuel.

I am also not a fan of additives. BUT...I use an old 15gal 'Blitz' fuel station to fuel my x748. My x748 does NOT have a block heater installed and, after looking at the service manual, I probably won't install one (the glow plugs work...amazingly well!) Last fall, when I topped that tank off, I added Power Service (white bottle) before I filled it and haven't had any gelled fuel yet - including going out on a -10deg day. The White bottle of Power Service is designed to keep the fuel from gelling. The Red bottle (911) is designed to thaw the fuel and get your diesel running - follow the directions on the bottle! The problem with Power Service, is that it is packaged to work with the (50/75/100gal) fuel tanks on semi-tractors... When I was out to my JD dealer last fall (after buying the Power Service) I noticed they offered an additive designed to work with our small fuel tanks. Something to keep in mind next year!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
With this new Diesel fuel you have to add some kind of lube if you want your injection pumps to last. Alot of people will add this to there fuel https://www.walmart.com/ip/SuperTech-Outboard-2-Cycle-TC-W3-Engine-Oil-16-fl-oz-Plastic-Jug/16913695 .
ULSD fuel has additives already in it to compensate for the loss of lubrication when removing the sulphur. ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) put in place a lubricity test requirement for ULSD that fuel manufacturers were required to adhere by prior to the government mandating the use of the fuel to the public. Say what you want about government regulations but they are not going to force a fuel into the market that would cause the existing millions and millions of diesel powered vehicles to suddenly fail. I worked in the automotive testing field during that time and was heavily involved with large truck (i.e. diesel engine) manufacturers. They were concerned at first but extensive testing showed no issues. On the other side of it I personally know a LOT of farmers and construction equipment operators running pre-2006 equipment (when ULSD was mandated) that have never added any type of additive to their fuel and have never had any issues.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top