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Discussion Starter #1
I'm not sure if this is in the right place--but here goes.I'm trying to repair a real slowwww gas leak in a metal fuel tank.It was made in two pieces with a seam around the middle.Has a slow drip leak at the bottom.What type solder would you think??:dunno:
 

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If the tank has no corrosion inside, rinse it out with either MEK or acetone. Get a can of Red Kote. a quart is good for a 12 gallon tank. I believe O'Reilly's has about the best price on it at around twenty five bucks a quart. Dump the stuff in, slowly roll the tank around so as to coat the inside completely. Pour out the excess back into the can. Let it set over night....no more leaks. Did a neighbor's tractor fuel tank at least five years ago. No problems.
 

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Or you could take it to Sims Radiator repair in Lawrenceville, GA. and have them boil out the tank and re-seal it. The last time I had one done I believe it was $60.00 or so, but a new tank was over $160.00 and they do exceptional work.

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thax fellows for the suggestions.I think I got it now;nothing to lose so I resoldered the seam where it was leaking,and wala!!:trink40:
 

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Dude11: Did you use a bernz-o-matic type torch directly or did you use an iron? I remember my Dad having a HUGE iron that was all 'head', that he'd suspend in front of a unleaded gasoline-burning 'blowtorch' and let get hot. I think it was normally used by tinsmiths when soldering seams. Allowed the sheet metal to get hot enough to flow the solder without deforming the sheet metal. But that was 50+ years ago.
tom
 

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Oh just clean the seam real good and use good ol JB weld. Works for me every time. I used it on a Camero and it was good for 8 years that sold the car and it was still holding. And have used it on a few tractor tanks metal and plastic. :thThumbsU
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Dude11: Did you use a bernz-o-matic type torch directly or did you use an iron? I remember my Dad having a HUGE iron that was all 'head', that he'd suspend in front of a unleaded gasoline-burning 'blowtorch' and let get hot. I think it was normally used by tinsmiths when soldering seams. Allowed the sheet metal to get hot enough to flow the solder without deforming the sheet metal. But that was 50+ years ago.
tom
To begin with,I washed it out with soap & water real good(really hate it when things go BOOM!!) Then used bens-o-torch,worked great.The iron you refered to was called a soldering iron,haven't used one in eon's.One I had was elect.so old it had the cloth covered plug wire.I think they had brass heads?? Collectable now,I'm sure.
 

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Dude 11 I have 2 of those irons one a little smaller then the other I still use them takes forever to heat up and cool but they work great for larger jobs you dont want to use torches on ED
 
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