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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was doing some research on medium sized tractors (and Dad happens to have 3 WD's) and noticed that in the later years after AC bought Buda they offered the Diesel Buda 230 as an option. From everything that I've read the Gas and Diesel engines share 90% of the same components (block is my primary concern here) so I am wondering if anybody knows how hard it is to convert a gas 4 cylinder to a diesel 6cylinder.

Why?
As I said Dad has 3 of these
1. WD narrow front gas (his working tractor)
2. WD45 wide front (stuck motor)
3. WD (or WD45 not sure right now) with NO motor

The neighbor has 2 running Buda motors for $150/each (Gleaner Combines). I want one for a backup for my CoOp E4 but the other.. well, I either don't buy it (not really an option when I want to keep around my old equipment) or I buy it and store it (boring) or I buy it and see if I can get one of the 'parts' WDs running again.

Thoughts?
-ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Found what I was looking for
262 gas in a WD45
Zyta said:
In my opinion AC should have built a 45 with a six cylinder from day one..It runs so smooth and has big power!! 90plus horses! and sound sweet.

All you need is the following:

-45D adapter plate or use the adapter from the combine and use a 45D plate to drill your holes.
-45D flywheel or the flywheel from cockshutt 40 or 50 will work
-45D heavy spring clutch plate
-45D throttle linkage used to go to the injection pump and convert it to work with the governor
-D19 Governor or Cockshutt governor if you want it to run like a normal tractor
-45D rad or convert the 45Gas rad
45D hood
Since I still know where the combines are I should be able to get the adapters and redrill the holes. I should have a spare flywheel and clutch from one of our CoOp/Cockshutts. I've got the radiator from a Gas, so I will have it modified as necessary. It shouldn't be too hard to fabricate some throttle linkage if I can't find usable parts.

Which leaves me with the hood.. I will run without one if I get the conversion completed until I can get one of the following..

Find a used one
Get a new one from Steiner for $480

-ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Pete, you and I are on the same page... so far my options are:

1. find good used diesel hood (optimal)

2. buy a new one, less optimal but a known cost and commodity

3. No hood, just run some street rod looking supports from the tank up to the radiator shell, then running a chrome stack.. (not long term)

4. Adding additional metal work to the front or rear of the hood, determine which looks better than modify it that way.. Shouldn't be too bad

5. stretch the hood in the middle and then use a metal brake to bend a new longer lip so the 'body line' isnt lost. Then fill in metal as neccessary.. more metal work but may have 'the right look' when done.

My initial project will be to get the motor installed/running then I will go with option #3 until I figure out which other path has the least resistance. Tin work is nice but if the equipment works without it.. well that can wait.

-ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If it don't work, there ain't no reason for it to be purdy. Or as I was saying to my neighbor the other day... "my tractor is ugly, but it works.. ever tried moving a bale of hay with a can of paint?" (referring to my 856)

-ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I've got some information about using a combine engine in a tractor at home (CoOp/Cockshutt related) and it states that you need to swap the timing cover in order to maintain some clearance at the front of the motor. I wonder if your friends swap ran into this issue. When Dad put the Gleaner motor into my CoOp he swapped it straight in and did not change the governor/timing cover and he had to find some very thin flex fans that barely fit between the waterpump and the radiator. All of the Tractor timing/governor covers are still on the original motors from my E4 and his Cockshutt 50 out back 'in a van for storage'.

I have everything that I need for this swap except the actual clutch parts (from any inline 6 Buda motor I need)
flywheel
friction disk
pressure plate

And once I acquire them I will let you know if it fits or hits..

I figure if it does not fit for any reason I will look into ways to stretch the frame, either adding material or seeing if there is any way that I can redrill and move the front axle assembly forward.

-ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I' sticking with a gas buda motor, the only reason I mention diesel at all is because it was a factory option. Gas and diesel use the same blocks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I think the diesel motors were hard on blocks and heads due to the higher compression. For example I have some Buda/Cockshutt information in front of me that says a gas 230 had 7.12:1 compression, but a 230 diesel had 15:1, just over 2x the gas CR.
 
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