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Onion plants came and no way to plant yet, ground too wet!---Will have to spread the plants out and keep cool/dark! Hope spring comes soon!--ground still freezing at night, gets sloppy during the daytime. One case= 30 bunches, we always plant a case.
 

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Onion plants came and no way to plant yet, ground too wet!---Will have to spread the plants out and keep cool/dark! Hope spring comes soon!--ground still freezing at night, gets sloppy during the daytime. One case= 30 bunches, we always plant a case.
This is the first year I started my onions from seed and so far they are doing great, the only reason I did this is because I was told the onions do a lot better this way instead of planting onion sets.
 

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I used 3500 lumen LED shop lights for my grow lights. As you can see in the pictures, the plants have a nice dark green color to them. I got the lights from Rural King, when they had them on sale for like $9.99. I have another buddy that spent some big bucks for the red, and blue only colored grow lights, and his plants didn't look nearly as good as mine.

I may go today, and see about getting the mustard seed for my biofumagation experiment. I'm only going to do about 1/2 to 2/3 of the garden this Spring, due to mustard being susceptible to a killing frost. I'm going to get enough seed to seed it twice, figuring on doing it towards Fall, when there is no danger of frost. I'll at least get a practice run in, to see how to go about it.
Im interested in LED light,need to know if it would help plants transition better to outdoor sun light vs fluorescent.
 

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They need to be full spectrum grow lights!---at least mine are. These are special grow tubes that came with our plant starter. They do work good, but keep light down just above the seedlings and raise a bit at the time as they grow.
The difference between daylight and cool white is the daylight type are brighter (different spectrum). cool white is more dim or yellowish (not good for plants, wrong spectrum).

In the past we tried regular tubes and found that they need to be the grow light type. thanks; sonny
 

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Discussion Starter #46
DJ54, Are they T8 bulbs and are they Daylight or Cool white bulbs?
These are 3500 lumen LED shop lights, not fluorescent. I'd been wondering early last year if that would work. I did a google search, and found several youtube video's on it, and how well it worked. Shortly there after, Rural King had these lights on sale for like $$9.99 ea., so got 4 of them. Only used 3, but as you can see, the color of the plants are a nice dark green.

Now I did do this in my shop,which has the light panels at the top of the sidewalls, but not sure if any natural light coming through them helped any. Any direct sunlight that does come through is only for about 2 hours, and to be honest, doubt it happened more than 3 days a week on average, as it's overcast a lot that time of year here, and especially last year, with all of the rain. The Rhubarb,and Asparagus I set out in my little greenhouse when it warmed up, mainly because the Rhubarb was taking up so much room with it's big leaves.

Pictures are of the Rhubarb, and Asparagus in the greenhouse on May 5 of last year. There was no apparent shock, or set back,after transferring them out there. I set them out sometime later in May,and they took off good. But a bout of extreme heat really set them back. The 4 year old Rhubarb I started from seed, immediately started bolting in that heat. I kept cutting them off, but did save 2 big heads to get seed from. When they were drying down I kept an eye on them. I looked late one evening, and decided it was getting close to cutting them, and put in a paper bag to dry. It dawned on me a few days later to cut them, as they were calling for rain the next day. Walked out with pruners in hand, only to find the Deer had ate them.

In Sept., it finally cooled some, and that young Rhubarb really took off. It had stalks big enough to harvest,and huge leaves. I left it go, not even cutting it off before cold weather, or putting any other mulch around, or over it. With the warm weather we've had, it is now growing. I need to walk down to where it is, and have a closer look. The idea behind it all, is to start it, then try top sell 1, or 2 year old crowns.
 

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This is the first year I started my onions from seed and so far they are doing great, the only reason I did this is because I was told the onions do a lot better this way instead of planting onion sets.
I'll have to give it a try. I was going to get onion seeds this year and then I second guessed myself thinking the sets would be easier and more of a fool proof method.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Sets are definitely easier, I'll probably do some myself. The only reason I do the seeds, is to keep the type of onion going sent to me, by one of the guys on here, a Mako Bronze. Nice large, but not too big yellow onion. Just a nice size if you do any cooking.

I also do some Leeks, as that's the only way I've seen to get one started. In fact, I set about 10 onions out today that I got at the grocery a couple weeks ago, and they started sprouting. So setting them out, so as to harvest the seed from them this Fall. Also had one Leeks survive the winter cold, and started growing already, so transplanted it to get seed from it also.

I've found it best to plant them in a hilled row. I didn't do that last year, and lost all of my onions seen in the trays above. And only 7 Leeks survived the downpour that wiped a lot of plants out. I'll not make that mistake again..!!
 

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Sets are definitely easier, I'll probably do some myself. The only reason I do the seeds, is to keep the type of onion going sent to me, by one of the guys on here, a Mako Bronze. Nice large, but not too big yellow onion. Just a nice size if you do any cooking.

I also do some Leeks, as that's the only way I've seen to get one started. In fact, I set about 10 onions out today that I got at the grocery a couple weeks ago, and they started sprouting. So setting them out, so as to harvest the seed from them this Fall. Also had one Leeks survive the winter cold, and started growing already, so transplanted it to get seed from it also.

I've found it best to plant them in a hilled row. I didn't do that last year, and lost all of my onions seen in the trays above. And only 7 Leeks survived the downpour that wiped a lot of plants out. I'll not make that mistake again..!!
Thanks for the tip. I have 6 scallion seedlings beginning to sprout in my portable greenhouse. I'll probably plant a couple more once I can work the soil outside and direct seed them a bit later on. I have an issue with poor planing so I get a bunch of them all at the same time.
 

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Like someone else, we just moved into a new house in November of 2018. So, this year will be my first garden on the new property. We have had a ton of rain and it doesn't seem to be going away any time soon. I did get two rounds of tilling but that soil is going to have to be beaten into submission. I am guessing two or three go-arounds with the tiller and it will be about right, but until it dries up that won't happen. Got out there today and tried....it didn't go well. I had hoped that the soil had dried out enough but I sunk in and had to work my way out with the loader....not my proudest moment.
The plot (as of right now) is around 150' by 50'. The bulk is going to be corn with a hand full of tomatoes, cukes, peppers, melons, and green beans. I used to plant a lot of tomatoes assuming I could give them away or last year my daughter and I tried to sell them. People I work with didn't like the fact the tomatoes weren't perfectly round....city folks! Melons and corn sold like hot cakes so that is what I am going to concentrate on. I found double delicious corn last year and it was the best corn I have had in twenty years. Tasted just like the corn I remember dad bringing home.
Tomatoes are always heirloom. Mortgage lifters are always on the list and last year I did especially well with Purple Prince. I always buy my plants, outside of beans and corn of course. Dad was a botanist and when I was younger always had a small greenhouse where he started his plants. Now that I have a place of my own and a little slice of land I am thinking I will build my own greenhouse and get into starting my own, but that will have to wait.
For hornworms I have always used some sort of Sevin dust, but now days that is taboo. I did try BT last year and I can't say that I was pleased with the results. It could have been my fault because I didn't reapply as often as I should have but the worms had a pretty good year. I ended up just picking them off and feeding them to the ducks. This year I will go back to some sort of garden dust. Did a soil test and the soil is deficient in everything. I can get all the manure I want from the neighbor who has cattle and horses, but I will probably end up amending with triple 12 or some sort fertilizer. I really think that it just needs some plant variety to get the soil in shape. I started planting buckwheat as a cover crop and with my corn last year at our old house. It helped to suppress the weeds in the corn and during the off season. I don't really use it as green manure so much because I want it to go to seed so it comes back on its own. Hopefully the soil dries out soon enough that I can broadcast some buckwheat ahead of planting my garden. That will help a ton with the nitrogen.
I am a little concerned about planting corn near the ag field that will be within twenty feet of my garden. If the farmer puts in beans, no problem. But if he does corn I wonder if cross pollination will be a problem....anyone with experience in this? I could potentially move the corn up the side area near the road, but that causes a few issues. First, I had planned on putting in a few fruit trees up there this year. Second, it's fairly low land so it might hold too much water. Third, it might be tempting to people in cars that pass by. Fourth, that area hasn't seen much more than the occasional bush hog in many many years and it is going to take a lot of work to get it corn ready.
According to the neighbor across the street, coons are a major issue with corn. Any tips on what all I need for an electric fence?
I have a few flower gardens planned also. Last weekend I build an above ground garden in front of the house for the wife's hydrangeas. Somewhere she wants to put in a memory garden dedicated to all those we have lost. Still haven't decided where that is going to go.
 

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Don't work the ground wet! ----The corn will cross being that close!--I have the same problem here this year with the guy across the fence.----Depending on your pref. for corn varieties, I have found that Round-up ready varieties perform the best when planted near field corn. I had some 2 years ago right next to his rows, only 30" away and it didn't cross!---If you can get your corn in 2 weeks ahead of his, OR 2 weeks after he plants you will be ok.


I don't have much coon problem here it's coyotes that are the problem! They destroyed over half my corn 2 years ago. I now have a woven wire fence around the big garden.
For coons an electric fence works. Put one wire 6" off the ground,--Second wire 6" above that and third wire 6" above that. One year I did a setup like this at the other place and it did keep coons out. --- Another problem is deer, hope you don't have them!----That's a whole different fence!!! thanks;sonny
 

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Sonny is right, if you work that ground when it's too wet it will be like concrete when it dries out and you try to work it to fine. I know from experience; I've done it.

take a shovel stick in the ground to get some dirt 4 - 6 inches down. squeeze a handful of dirt if it makes a ball and stays together it's probably too wet. The dirt should crumble a little bit.

There may be better ways to tell but in Ohio this has always worked for me.
 

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Sonny is right, if you work that ground when it's too wet it will be like concrete when it dries out and you try to work it to fine. I know from experience; I've done it.

take a shovel stick in the ground to get some dirt 4 - 6 inches down. squeeze a handful of dirt if it makes a ball and stays together it's probably too wet. The dirt should crumble a little bit.

There may be better ways to tell but in Ohio this has always worked for me.
Your right on.
 

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Working the wet ground was a combination of me chomping at the bit to get going on the garden and me underestimating the amount of rain we had. I am usually more patient but with the new property I have been ready to garden since we moved in back in November.
Hopefully this weekend I can get together with the neighbor and haul manure so it will be ready to go when I get a few days without rain.
 

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Working the wet ground was a combination of me chomping at the bit to get going on the garden and me underestimating the amount of rain we had. I am usually more patient but with the new property I have been ready to garden since we moved in back in November.
Hopefully this weekend I can get together with the neighbor and haul manure so it will be ready to go when I get a few days without rain.
I so wanted to work the garden last weekend. Saturday the temps were in the 60’s and I got the tiller set to go, but the soil was just too wet still. The ground temp is hovering at 40° and I really wanted to start some peas, but they will have to wait. And today it’s pouring rain

I’ve been trying to find some 5-10-10 to turn in, per a soil test recommendation from UConn, but have had no luck. The only product I found was in small and $$ bags of plant food. I may try Agway down in Westerly, or I may just improvise.

In the interim I’ve got trees to drop on the South side of the garden to reduce shading.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
If you have a place nearby that sells bulk fertilizer to farmers, and they will let you get a small amount, you can mix your own, you just have to calculate how much you need overall. Easiest way to calculate how much of each you need, is to figure by 100 lbs. Your numbers reflect the percentage in any amount of weight. So, for 100 lbs. you'd need 5 lbs N, 10 lbs. P & 10 lbs K.

Being I'm very high here in P, I made a mix of N & K, prescribed by my soil test. My main concern was what the filler material was, when they mix bulk fertilizer. I asked one of the girl's working the counter at a local feed mill where I bought the fertilizer, and just got a deer in the headlight look. She referred me to the other girl, who is a farm girl, and her family also owned a plant and tree nursery. She spit it right out...., pelletized lime. So, I bought 2 bags of that too, and was good to go.

I have a cheapie electric concrete mixer I bought for like $15 at a local consignment auction, which made the perfect mixer for the job. I can mix 50 lbs. at a time in it. I weighed out the amounts needed, and let it mix for 5 minutes or so. It did a great job, and blended it just like the big dogs do at the bulk plants. I guess that's the plus side to having way too many toys...

I suppose you could pour a small amount back & forth in 5 gallon buckets if you don't have that luxury, but, that little mixer was well worth the $15 I gave for it at that moment.
 

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Thank you, DJ54. I’ve looked around online and called the nursery I considered to be my best hope, but this gives me more choices. I will post my results.

Now I’ve gone and ordered som asparagus crowns on a whim. We had two beds of asparagus when we first moved up here in 1967. My father did them in with the lawn tractor. I’ll probably be the only one to eat these. I tried to plant them for my mom in 1979 or so, but I’ve been doing a lot of reading up, this time.
 

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Discussion Starter #58
I love asparagus..!! I started 50 crowns 3 years ago, and due to a lot of rain, although the area is well drained. some did not make it. So save some of the larger seed pods, when they go to seed, and start more if you like. I pull them, and let them dry over the winter. Then in the early Spring, break them open, as there are 4-5 seeds in each little round seed pod.

I'm anxious to see how much mine develop this year, that I started last year. I need to start more this year, since last years did so well getting started, to replenish my asparagus bed. My intentions were to have enough to can in pint jars. What I have left from the original planting is just enough to eat fresh.
 

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I like to eat asparagus but never tried to grow it, I would like to try and grow some horseradish some time, I did finally get my cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower and peas planted yesterday, now I'm hoping to get onions planted this morning before the rain.
 

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Did someone say HORSERADISH???? lol!!! I have that stuff growing here all over the place!! I sent some starts to a guy out east a few years ago and he loves it!---This is a very old variety that I got from a farmstead that was bulldozed out. I know it was on that farm for over a hundred years from history of the farm. This is the hot kind, so a dab-l-do ya type hot! lol!!
 
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