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Discussion Starter #1
What's the manufacturing cost difference in fuel injection systems over carburetors?

I say this is 2011, all carburetors should be replaced by modern technology referred to as fuel injection.

Those 300 and 500 series owners would think they died and went to heaven.

Who's with me???
 

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I dunno, I like the way my carb starts and I don't have a fuel inj light come on like I've heard some of the others do when the weather is cold out. LOL... I do see the point though and agree there are MANY things technology could be applied to like making a seat that won't crack. :dunno::drunkie::trink39::trink39::trink39:
 

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I love fuel injection on my cars and trucks, nothing finer! On my mowers and tractors I do like my carbs. They run at a steady RPM most all the time, unlike a car so I see no real advantage other than it's modern and will save a little on fuel in the long run. Plus a carb is easy to rebuild when a problem arises. JMHO
 

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Discussion Starter #4
making a seat that won't crack.
I don't think there is a way to keep one from cracking?
That is a concern of mine now that the cold weather is here.
I doubt one of those John Deere seat covers the Lowe's sell would help.
 

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There will probably always be a market for both. Carbs are simpler to work on and if you are in an environment that requires simplicity then maybe it's the way to go. Plus there is a price break. Some folks just like older technology because that is what they are familiar with. The carb on my 400 gets cranky sometimes but still works great. The one on my 425 works well too, but requires a lot of choke on start up, no matter the season.

For those with fuel injection, I gather it's electronic and there is a PCM/ECU squirrled away some where on the tractor? If so, with as much vibration and heat is on a garden tractor, I am surprised there are not more failures of fuel injection units due to computer issues. It would seem JD has it worked out.

With all the entry level tractors out there and their inflated (in my mind) prices they charge, I doubt you will ever see carbs completely wiped out. The technology is too cheap and reliable not to use to increase profits. Adding fuel injection to a D100 would either kill the profit or jack up the price as to make it unaffordable.

Another example of this as I wonder off topic a bit, is I did a top end rebuild on my buddies 99 Honda Civic a couple of years ago. It was the first Honda I had worked on and I expected a bit of cutting edge technology because Civics get such good mileage. Not so. While it had fuel injection, it still had a distributor. Most cars of that class had switched to distributorless ignitions back in the early to mid-90's. So the point is, there will always be a use for older technologies as corporations leverage them to max profits etc. Besides if it works, why change just to change?

The only thing that will kill off the carb will be emissions regulations. That's what did them in on cars. A carb will deliver similar fuel usage rates if property tuned, but that's a manual process. With electronic fuel injetion that is an instant and constant process handled by the computer.
 

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Emissions, driveability, and ease of operation will cause EFI to be more widely adopted. Most people these days have no idea what a "choke" is, or how to use it. Or how to feather it in cold weather. I'm not sure just how much leaner a carb can get. The price of EFI might be a wash once you consider the costs of catalytic converters and such that are surely coming to meet emissions.

JD has had EFI since 1989 so it's hardly new technology, and in general is no more troublesome then a carb. But you have to understand how it works.
 
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