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Discussion Starter #1
I need to replace the front tires on my 4wd Ford 1710. I have both ag rims and turf rims for it. The ag tires are currently on the tractor, and I don't really plan on swapping back and forth. I'm missing a few gears that are needed for the front drive shaft to work, so R1 lugs on the front tires don't really help me much. In looking for replacements the 6.00x16 tires that I'm finding only go up to an 1800 lb load rating. That seems a little low. My rear tires are loaded and have wheel weights installed. With the loader empty and nothing on the 3pt, I'm tipping the scales at close to 4,000 lbs. So if I have enough in the bucket to start loosing traction, I have to think that I'm well over 1,800 lbs on each front tire. Is there a 6.00x16 tire available that will take a heavier load, or will I need to use the turf rims with an industrial (skid steer) tread pattern?
 

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AKA Moses Lawnagan
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The weight of the rear tires, including the weights and liquid load, don't play into the weight carried on the front wheels/tires, since it isn't carried on the tractor frame. If you had several hundred pounds of suitcase weights hanging off the front of the tractor, then that would make a difference; the same goes for the loader and whatever is in the bucket. If each tire is rated for 1800 pounds, that's 3600 pounds for the front half of the tractor. If your total weight is 4000 pounds including your loaded and weighted rear wheels, you should have no problems. Do you know how much your rear wheels/tires weigh including the load and wheel weights? Subtract that from your total weight to get the weight of the tractor (which in this case WOULD include the front tires/wheels). The current tires you have on the front should also have their weight limits on the carcass sidewall, I suspect they are about the same as the new ones you're looking at.

Edit: The data I found says the weight on the 1710 4x4 version is about 2700 pounds. That would increase by about 650 pounds for the loader, so your total tractor weight is around 3350 lb. and that would put your rear wheel ballast around 650 lb (and that weight isn't carried by the front wheels). Take roughly half of 2700 pounds, which is 1350 lb. and add the loader weight, which is carried mostly on the front wheels, so that would be about 2000 lb. These are rough figures, but you see that you still have at least 1600 lbs. less weight up front than the tires are rated for, so to fully load the front tires, you'd need about 1600 pounds in the bucket.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you! I realized weight on the rear of the tractor, including the loaded rear tires, doesn't really put any pressure on the front axle. It does, however, slow me to put more weight in the bucket before loosing traction on the rear, and that does put more weight on the front tires.

My tractor weighs 2,500 lb on its own. Rear tires have a little over 30 gal (ea) of beat juice (660 lb total). Not sure how much the wheel weights are, but they are at least 75 lb ea. I'm estimating that my loader weights about 1000 lbs. My rear forks weigh another 150. I normally have a railroad tie (200 lb) on them if I'm using the loader. That puts my total weight at 4,650 lb without anything in the bucket. I don't ever lift the rear tires off the ground, but I'd rather be safe than sorry ?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Just saw your edit. I'm heavy on my loader estimate. The 770 loader is less than 600 lbs, and is rated to lift 850 lbs. Having said that, since the bucket puts the weight 3' out in front of the axle (leverage), probably best to assume that 850 lb will put at least 1,200 lb of weight on the front axle. That still puts me close to 3,200 lbs Max on the front axle, so 1,800 lb tires should be okay.
 

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AKA Moses Lawnagan
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If you look at the ag tires you presently have on the front, somewhere on the sidewall will be listed their load limit. My guess is it's somewhere in the ballpark of the new ones you're looking at.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Unfortunately mine are dry rotted and cracked so bad that I can't read the numbers any more. If I pick up a load, they look like they are about to blow. I suspect that they are currently under inflated, but I'm afraid to put more air in them. This the need for replacements ?
 
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