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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2005 ltx1000 .Front end can literally lift wheel when from stop starting out in 5 or. 6 gear with throttle up at half not very smooth . Also are these tractors shift on the fly
 

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Popping wheelies with manual transmission lawn and garden tractors has been a tradition since they were first brought to the market.

No, you cannot shift gears on the fly. You can try, but it really is not recommended unless you have a spare transmission on hand.
 
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My Sears Super Suburban 12 has manual trans, with low and high ranges so I get 6 forward and 2 reverse speeds.
The engagement comes from an idler pulley being pulled against the drive belt when you release the clutch pedal. If your's is similar, you might check to see that the following are correctly installed.
  • Belt is in good shape and not worn to the point of being a limp noodle. In this condition they tend to grab.
  • Belt is correctly seating in the pulleys and not bottoming out in the bottom of the groove.
  • Clutch spring is the correct one, and is positioned correctly and applying the right pressure to the belt
  • Ease up when releasing the clutch pedal
Others might have some further suggestions.

Shift on the fly implies that the machine can achieve sufficient speed and momentum in one gear to keep it rolling while you hunt for and engage the next gear. Really hard if not impossible to achieve on a garden tractor unless you are on pavement, and headed down hill.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My Sears Super Suburban 12 has manual trans, with low and high ranges so I get 6 forward and 2 reverse speeds.
The engagement comes from an idler pulley being pulled against the drive belt when you release the clutch pedal. If your's is similar, you might check to see that the following are correctly installed.
  • Belt is in good shape and not worn to the point of being a limp noodle. In this condition they tend to grab.
  • Belt is correctly seating in the pulleys and not bottoming out in the bottom of the groove.
  • Clutch spring is the correct one, and is positioned correctly and applying the right pressure to the belt
  • Ease up when releasing the clutch pedal
Others might have some further suggestions.

Shift on the fly implies that the machine can achieve sufficient speed and momentum in one gear to keep it rolling while you hunt for and engage the next gear. Really hard if not impossible to achieve on a garden tractor unless you are on pavement, and headed down hill.
Thanks for the input
 

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the brake pedal also acts as a clutch by putting slack on the belt...
so when trying to get going, release the brake slowly, just like you would release a clutch slowly.....

yea, yea... I know that's "no-fun" but it's safe!
 

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Actually, popping wheelies comes under the heading of "Testing the V-belt Drive" in a tractor with a manual transmission. If the front wheels don't come off the ground at 1/2 - 3/4 throttle in the highest gear when the clutch/brake pedal is released rapidly, there is a problem with the belt tension, belt, or pulleys that needs to be addressed.

The equivalent test for a hydro transmission is to add normal ballast and tie the tractor to an immovable object and then advance the drive control at 1/2 - 3/4 throttle. If the wheels don't spin, there is a problem with the V-belt drive or the hydro itself.

The difference is that, unlike the fast release of the clutch with a manual transmission, the drive control for a hydro can be advanced slowly to achieve the same V-belt test result. How far the drive control can be advanced before wheel spin is achieved helps in the determination of the condition of the hydro once the belt drive is set up correctly.

Such testing should be done on grass or gravel, not rough concrete. You want to test the drive systems, not break them.
 

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I would also check the pedal mechanism. If it binds or has sticky spots in its travel, the quick movement when the bind released could cause abrupt acceleration. The same thing applies to the idler pulley mechanism. If it sticks and suddenly starts to move, you would get the same results.
The owners manual I have, a PDF of a close but not exact model, indicates the operator is to come to a complete halt before shifting gears. To do otherwise runs the risk of breaking the 'keys' that select the individual gears(linking them to the shaft). I figure mine is old enough to go to a bar on its own, so likely has no replacement parts readily available. Given that, I don't want to break something I likely cannot fix, so I do come to a complete halt before changing gears.
tom
 
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The owners manual I have, a PDF of a close but not exact model, indicates the operator is to come to a complete halt before shifting gears. To do otherwise runs the risk of breaking the 'keys' that select the individual gears(linking them to the shaft). I figure mine is old enough to go to a bar on its own, so likely has no replacement parts readily available. Given that, I don't want to break something I likely cannot fix, so I do come to a complete halt before changing gears.
tom
The gears in small tractors are straight cut, often with no lead ramp for engaging. The teeth have to be almost perfectly aligned to mesh. Fortunately that's not a big problem with the reduction ratios involved.
 

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The gears are meshed all the time if I have the workings correct. The 'keys' are used to engage the already-rotating gears with the input/output shaft. The keys are a form of 'dog clutch'.
The above applies to the light duty transmissions(transaxles) used in riding mower type applications. Other, real 'transmission' types, move the gears to engage/disengage and change ratios.
The OP has a lt1000, which is the lightest of duty level AYP products. It likely has a 5/6 speed transaxle as described above. It is not a separate transmission with the Hi/Lo select. A donut says the owners manual states that coming to a complete stop before shifting is the recommended procedure. The one feature of a 'gear' transmission missing is the ability to up/down shift without having to stop. Given parts availability(close to none), I baby that little box, and do come to a stop before shifting. A hydro is nice when you have differing growth and a speed change would be desired, but they have their own set of features and problems.
tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
the brake pedal also acts as a clutch by putting slack on the belt...
so when trying to get going, release the brake slowly, just like you would release a clutch slowly.....

yea, yea... I know that's "no-fun" but it's safe!
Thanks
The gears are meshed all the time if I have the workings correct. The 'keys' are used to engage the already-rotating gears with the input/output shaft. The keys are a form of 'dog clutch'.
The above applies to the light duty transmissions(transaxles) used in riding mower type applications. Other, real 'transmission' types, move the gears to engage/disengage and change ratios.
The OP has a lt1000, which is the lightest of duty level AYP products. It likely has a 5/6 speed transaxle as described above. It is not a separate transmission with the Hi/Lo select. A donut says the owners manual states that coming to a complete stop before shifting is the recommended procedure. The one feature of a 'gear' transmission missing is the ability to up/down shift without having to stop. Given parts availability(close to none), I baby that little box, and do come to a stop before shifting. A hydro is nice when you have differing growth and a speed change would be desired, but they have their own set of features and problems.
tom
thank you very informative
 
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