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Discussion Starter #21
Cool I have been wanting to get a forge and anvil for a while now. Just not gotten to it yet. Anvils are always way over priced IMO. I like what you have created so far. Keep at it, practice makes any forger better or breaks em LOL.
Thanks!

Anvils are no cheaper on the East coast! Been using a cast Harbor Freight anvil for many years now. One of the Blacksmith Guild members had an old Anvil for sale at our last meeting. Kind of beat up but still better than the HF anvil so I bought it for $300.00, more than I wanted to pay but good anvils are few and far between around here.

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Now you need a nice stump/round of hardwood to mount that anvil on....
Your other work is inspiring so far...

glenn
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Now you need a nice stump/round of hardwood to mount that anvil on....
Your other work is inspiring so far...

glenn
Funny that you mentioned a stump for the anvil.... I've been saving a Pecan tree stump from when Hurricane Mathew blew it down on my property. Scraped the bark off and began cutting top square / level (using boards as guides). Got about halfway through when my chainsaw's clutch burnt up....That's some HARD wood! Bought a clutch kit, now need a weekend off to repair the saw and slowly cut the stump ends level to mount the anvil.

Got everything I need to make the coffee can forge now, so my next spare time I'll be building it.

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SandDawg I admire your skill set. There are many people on MTF that have very useful talents and you are certainly one of them.

If you hadn't been forging and hammering for a while and then started back up how did your arms feel the next day or two? I would think you have a very powerful grip and forearms like Popeye. Does your daily job keep you in hammering shape?
 

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Discussion Starter #27
If you have a forge you need one of these to. Granpa had a forge triphammer use to sharpen a lot of plow shares in his day.
NICE power hammer, would love to have one but no money for one.....there's always the lottery! :tango_face_devil:

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Discussion Starter #28
SandDawg I admire your skill set. There are many people on MTF that have very useful talents and you are certainly one of them.

If you hadn't been forging and hammering for a while and then started back up how did your arms feel the next day or two? I would think you have a very powerful grip and forearms like Popeye. Does your daily job keep you in hammering shape?
I felt good actually, correct stance and hammer technique helps....sadly I don't know either! I look more like Wimpy than Popeye "I'll pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today!". :sidelaugh

My daily job as an Electronics technician keeps me chained to a work bench, benefit: the pay is good for this area.

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NICE power hammer, would love to have one but no money for one.....there's always the lottery! :tango_face_devil:

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That's not the actual one but a pic I found that was close. I'll bet it's still out there on the farm unless the guy that bought the place sold it for scrap. He sold off most of the 160 acres to survive.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
That's not the actual one but a pic I found that was close. I'll bet it's still out there on the farm unless the guy that bought the place sold it for scrap. He sold off most of the 160 acres to survive.
Hopefully the hammer went to a good home in a Blacksmith's shop!

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Discussion Starter #31
Went to the February Blacksmith's guild meeting, had a good time talking with fellow Smiths and watching demonstrations. Bought a two pound Rounding / Flat face hammer from one of our members. He makes some great hammers, all done by hammer work (no power hammer).

After getting home I repaired the clutch on my chainsaw and finished cutting the Pecan tree stump to the correct height to mount the anvil. Used a router to cut out the shape of the anvil base to 1 inch depth on top of the stump. This will make the anvil more stable and less side to side movement. I might still clamp the anvil down to the stump but I like to be able to turn the anvil on it's side at times. Nice to be able to use more surfaces of the anvil than just it's top. :fing32:

I put a thick layer of paint on the bottom to help preserve the stump's base from rotting, I'll do several coats in the next few days. I'll coat the rest of the stump with polyurethane to try and keep the insects from burrowing into the wood. I'll most likely drag out a chunk of broken concrete from my pile and bury it level with the ground where I want my anvil to sit to help keep the stump out of the dirt.

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Discussion Starter #33
Looks real good! Wish I would have grabbed an anvil from my dad's place. Got the old lathe though.
Thanks, Forging area finally starting to look like a forge shop.

LUCKY you, I always wanted to learn how to run a lathe! :fing32:

Been drooling over one of these for years....Just a bit out of my price range.

https://smithy.com/granite-xt

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Discussion Starter #34
Painted a second coat on stump base, Sprayed polyurethane all over stump...soaked top down thick to seal end grain. Laid down the concrete base for the anvil stump...productive morning.

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Discussion Starter #35
Worked on the gas forge some today.

Upgraded housing from a coffee can to a Balloon Time helium cylinder. Cut the top off then welded it to the cylinder side as a base for the forge. Drilled a hole in the cylinder side for the gas burner mounting sleeve to be welded on. scrounged parts up for forming the interior cavity when refractory mix is tamped down around form.

Dinner time so called it a night.

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Discussion Starter #36
Alright...got a little time this morning during the rain to work in my shop.

Installed a center slip form into the tank, drilled a hole into the the PVC pipe for the burner tube. Cut from bottom of PVC pipe to sides of drilled hole so it can be removed while sliding pipe up and out of the rammed refractory. Used a plastic cup to hold PVC cut out in place, then wrapped duct tape around outside of pipe to seal cut lines. Slipped this form over burner support pipe that's welded onto the tank's side. Centered the PVC pipe by eyeballing it.

Mixed up the refractory and began ramming it around the PVC form. I've decided to make this forge into a pass through forge (front and rear ends will be open) allowing long stock to stick out from both openings. This will be less efficient in heat / gas but I can work on the middle of long projects. Will make a hinged door with refractory lining later to close the back opening when not needed.

Left about 1/4" of steel tank wall sticking up above rammed refractory mix, planning to coat the inside walls and face of the forge with a protective refractory paste to protect the softer rammed refractory lining once it has cured.

Will allow to dry for several days then do low burns to cure the refractory mix before applying protective coating.

Done for now.

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Discussion Starter #37 (Edited)
Good and bad news...

Good News: Got the refractory packed around the PVC form, bad thing is face of the refractory broke apart while removing pipe. It can be fixed but was hoping for a better first try.

Note to self, wrap pipe in wax paper, the Water Glass chemical adheres to the smooth plastic pipe. I had to fight to get the pipe out and resorted to cutting the pipe out with a saw-zall. The refractory mix becomes very sticky, quickly with the addition of the plaster of paris as a hardener.

Since I damaged the refractory I decide to go ahead and fire the forge after only a day to dry. Found out I used to much of the Water Glass, it began bubbling out from the metal casing. I was thinking I had to coat the Perlite thickly but I'll be using about half of what I did this time on my next build.

Let the burner run naturally aspirated for about 45 mins then gave it a short burst of forced air from the mini-shopvac to check out the burner. Horseshoe nail did get to forging temp while naturally aspirated for thirty mins but became orange hot in less than a minute when air was forced down burner tube. The perlite melted nicely together also.

Now have to build an air gate to control air flow to burner and I need a much smaller fan / blower than the mini-shopvac.

I may also have to cut base off and turn the burner to a more upright position, then reweld the base back on to the tank side. Was hoping for more of a tornado (swirling) effect from the burner. Flame hits the opposite wall then flows out the ends. Blocked off one end and this did help to conserve heat.

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Discussion Starter #38 (Edited)
Gas forge working good, I need to put burner straight up so I'll be cutting the base stand off and rewelding. Hair drier works perfect for air flow, just the right volume on LOW setting. Heated horseshoe nail to weld heat in about a minute. worked great on 1/4" round stock also.

Forced air burner very hot, the flame is damaging the refractory so I'll be getting a thin fire brick for the flame blast area.

The hair dryer / PVC pipe set up is temporary, pipe is held together with electrical tape. I'll make a more permanent mount for the hair dryer.

Otherwise very happy with the build.

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Discussion Starter #40
How far into the flame did you have to go? Would this work as well standing vertical?

Draw a straight line from the burner tube to the opposite wall, that's where the flame blast hits. was thinking the flame would swirl around inside the round chamber, but it hits the wall and flows out each end opening. I wanted the metal stock to be out of the direct blast...now I think it will be more efficient in the flame blast area.

The horseshoe nail was laying flat on the current floor of the forge....maybe 2-3 inches out of the direct flame, it still heated up quickly to bright yellow within a minute (after forge had been heated up for 20 mins or so).

I plan on cutting the base / stand off of the tank and rotating the burner to the straight up position so the floor of the forge will be directly beneath the flame blast. I'll have to buy a thin firebrick to protect the floor of the forge.

Hope this answers your questions...if not ask more questions. :fing32:

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