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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone,
Thanks for the warm welcome. I am new to tractors but have always lusted after one for decades- but just havent had the need to purchase one until now. My wife and I have purchased our first home. Its a nice place in the country. It has three or so acres, some woods, some orchard, a pond, a ravine and a barn! After renting for a dozen years we finally have a place of our own.

HOWEVER...my Murray 42" garden tractor is not up to the task of mowing the field which is approx 2 acres of thick grass on a slope. I killed it with just two mows. RIP. The property is a combination of many gradiated slopes for drainage as well as hillside retention.

In my research I have decided against another garden tractor. I just dont think they will be as useful as a full sized tractor. I really like the versatility of running a brush hog, sickle bar mower, as well as plowing and moving machinery- I am also a metal sculptor and have heavy metal sculptures in the works that could benefit the use of a tractor.

Originally I was thinking of a Ford 8n as their cost is right around what I can afford and they are plentiful and repairs are easily accomplished. I am also a good wrench on vehicles and machinery.
But, I dont like the idea of the PTO being one that isnt live and can drive the tractor further with momentum of a PTO tool. Also the lack of ROPS terrifies me. Years ago I witnessed a rollover which resluted in a serious injury and dont want that to happen to me or my children to see.

So, long story short I have been researching the Ford LCG (low center of gravity) series of industrial tractors. I like the wide and low stance, the high floatation rears and the low height for orchard trimming. I think they were used by the Highway departments for berm and hillside highway mowing. I know that this is the tractor I'm after but accrding to some sites there are about 4 different models the 230A, 530A, 4110 and 2110. I assume there may be more models as well? I am uncertain which model would best suit my needs? I 'd like the ability to use a belly mower as well as eventually mount a front bucket. Diesel? Gas? Cosmetically unimportant but running well and ease of repair and parts would be nice.

I'll leave it with the group. I'd like very much to know what you all think.
Cheers, Greg
 

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I'm not sure how much of a slope you're dealing with but I easily maintain three acres with a Hustler Zero Turn mower. I also have an 8N with a RM Woods mower & a 4000 Row Crop tricycle and bush hog - Neither of them see much mowing duty. A ZTM will cut circles (literally) around any other type of mower. My time for sitting on a tractor all day have long since passed.
 

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Farmer
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I would suggest you look at Ford 4000. They have many models with some in the lower center of gravity and there are plenty around. Take a look at TractorHouse. With the right weights they should work depending on the steepness of the hills.
 

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Many people start out thinking they can have one tractor for all chores.... but it rarely works out that way unless your budget will support a new 20k tractor.

Zero Turn AND Rear Steer Front Mowers BOTH cut grass in a third of the time any tractor mounted mower is capable of... with 3 acres of field mowing I would look at the rear steer units.. they are more stable in rough hilly terrain than a ZT.

You mention a budget that will support purchasing a Ford N.... thats not really enough of a budget for a multi use tractor... and an N is also a long ways from a Ford 4110.... the 4110 is a big tractor... probably near 60 hp I would guess. A 2110 is maybe more along the size you need, and all the toys you might want are probably available for a tractor that size... but it is still not likely in the same budget as an N, around here an N can go anywhere from $1000 to $4000 depending on condition and attachments... a 2110 will start at $4000 and go up from there. The 230a/530a LCG tractors might be about the right size also but Im pretty sure those have a LIVE PTO, and more HP than you need, and again will start at 4K. Can you narrow down the budget for us?

Keep in mind that a ROPS can be installed on any mower/tractor, if you get a deal on the right tractor, buy it and have a ROPS added to it later.
 

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The only differences between the Ford LCG tractors and the regular ag chassis tractor made at the same time were the height of the front spindles and the front and rear wheel and tire sizes.

Ford LCG tractor models:

2031 -- 1960-1962 (LCG chassis of 4 cylinder 2000 series)
4031 -- 1960-1962 (LCG chassis of 4 cylinder 4000 series)
2131 -- 1963-1964 (LCG chassis of 4 cylinder 2000 series)
4131 -- 1963-1964 (LCG chassis of 4 cylinder 4000 series)
2110 -- 1965-1975 (LCG Chassis of 3 cylinder 2000 series)
4110 -- 1965-1975 (LCG Chassis of 3 cylinder 4000 series)
231 -- 1975-1981 (LCG model sibling of the 2600)
531 -- 1975-1981 (LCG model sibling of the 4600)
231A -- 1981-1982 (LCG model sibling of the 2610)
530A -- 1981-1983 (LCG model sibling of the 4610)
 

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The 8n can run a 5' brushog or 6' finish mower with the use of an ORC. It doesn't have live hydraulics or live pto. A better option,for a few dollars more, might be the 600/601 series model 660/661. This will give you about 34 hp, live hydraulics and live PTO. Another option might be the 641 but this will not have live PTO. You could still use the ORC to run with the mowers. These tractors are a little cheaper to run then the 800/801/4000. You could also put a loader on them and with the adjustable front axle and front and rear adjustable wheels it would be stable on your hillsides. Probably the 8n will get the job done but the 600/601 series is a better option, IMO.

Kirk
 

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Excerpt from the OP-- "Also the lack of ROPS terrifies me. Years ago I witnessed a rollover which resulted in a serious injury and don't want that to happen to me or my children to see."

The thought of a rollover is what should terrify! Roll-over protective structures (ROPS) may provide some measure of safety, but I don't want to experience the need. If you are inexperienced to the "seat of the pants" safe operation of a heavy tractor, gain that experience in small steps and don't push insane limits.

I'm sure you understand--Don't tackle projects with abandon without knowing a tractor's capabilities to keep the rubber on the ground! A tractor handled wrongly can flip so fast...a bystander may say, "I can't believe I just saw that!" But, not to scare anyone away from tractor operation, thousands of hours have been spent safely on tractors with and without ROPS.

ROPS can be a plus, but...
 

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One of my friends lost his dad to a rollover. He was a 55 year old farmer, well experienced in tractor operation, and driving it on familiar ground. He hit a groundhog hole that wasn't there before - that and the slope of the hill was enough. My friend tried to pull his dad out, then had to run a mile to a road for help. This was pre- cell phone days.

I guess my point here is that even when you are experienced and think you have things under control, they may not be. ROPS is a nice safety net in that case. But I also agree with your point that one should never put yourself in a position where you think you might need it.
 

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Cloudatlas,
Welcome to the forum and congratulations on your new home. I have a 50 acre hunting camp that I play around at most of the year. I cut trails in the woods, cut knee high grass and trim around approx. 2,000 oak and maples that I planted and are now about 3'-4' tall. For my cuttin' chores I settled on a Ford 860. It's a 5 speed with a live PTO. I installed a new short block and had the head rebuilt. My wife helped me put the halves back together when I was all done. Look around and you never know what you'll find. Mine was free! Guy just wanted to get rid of it because the block was cracked (no antifreeze). I spent $1400 on a short block, $250 for a rebuilt head, $500 for new rear tires and rims, and then there was the misc. stuff like some paint, etc. I now have a tractor that's as good as a new one for about $2500, and I already have 250 hours on the meter. Good luck in your search.
Duane
And again, WELCOME!
 

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Cloudatlas, did you ever come to a conclusion on the right tractor for your needs? Did you end up with a 2110?
 

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The OP hasn't been on the forum since Nov of last yr.
MikeC
 
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