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The Ford 3000 that I have on the farm had a problem with the power steering. There is one small leak but it is very minimal, but I seem to keep losing the oil. I took the pump off and disassembled it. There seems to be quite a bit of play in the shaft (22) and the front of the pump (29) where the large gear is that runs on the front of the engine. Could this be where the oil is bypassing and possibly going into the crank case?

If there is excessive wear, is there anything that can be done or should I just buy a new pump?

 

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Check your crankcase oil level, if you are losing fluid out the front of the p/s pump the engine oil level should be rising. Those pumps are known to leak through those front seals once the seals get some years on them.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes the crankcase has a bit of extra oil in it. Not sure how much clearance there should be on the shaft where it enters that cover. I also have the part number off of the pump but cannot find anything that is close to it for numbers online. The number I have is C9NN3K514D.
 

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Numbers stamped or cast on parts are not usually the actual part number. They are usually design engineering numbers that only mean something to the Ford engineers.

If that picture you posted is correct for your pump, you have the older style pump with the separate reservoir up over top of the pump body. The 3000 should have have the 650 psi version of that pump. The original part number for the pump was C7NN3A674C, which was superseded by part number 81816576. But it looks like that earlier style pump is no longer available new, so if you want to replace it you would have to find a decent used one at a salvage yard or you would have to switch to the newer style with the reservoir that is integrated into the body of the pump. The part number for the newer style pump is E6NN3K514DA, which is still available, but you would also need to change the lines between the pump and the steering column as well.

Or you could replace the seals in the pump you have, as the seal kits are still available as part number DHPN3A674A.
 

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Like This?



If that's what you've got then the first drawing that you posted isn't the correct one. Notice that the caption under the picture says "Exploded view of early power steering pump". The one that I posted here is the later style.
 

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I just posted the answer below to your similar post over on the yesterdays tractor forum:

A 1966 should have the pump with th eexternal reservoir up above th epump body. The New Holland parts site shows the part number for the seal kit as DHPN3A674A. The price for an OEM kit form a New Holland dealer is probably going to be pricey, partspring and Messicks both show the price at a little over $120.00, but there are a number of aftermarket kits available on-line for under $40.00 if you google that part number, but I haven't had any experience with those aftermarket kits, so hopefully someone who has will chime in and let you know if they are any good.
 

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Hello folks, purchased my first tractor today and am extremely pleased. It's a Ford 3000 and I'm having one issue so far:

I have a leak from my power steering pump and I am just wanting to double check that I will be ordering to correct replacement..

2459488

Where the blue circle is, is where it is leaking.

2459489

Numbers on the Steering pump.

2459490

B1123C
OH21B
G281675

I think I have a 1970 Ford 3000 from what I can decipher?

2459491

Full view of steering pump.

Reading through this thread am I correct in assuming that this is a newer style steering pump, and that the correct replacement pump is now E6NN3K514DA?

Other than it being harder to steer, how else can I tell if the pump is out or if it's just the leak that needs to be fixed, and if it's just a leak and I am to replace the seals, is DHPN3A674A the correct seal kit for this pump?

hah! Hope this kind of makes sense and if this is covered somewhere else please just toss me a link and i'll go from there. Figured this would be a good starting spot to check.

Thanks!
 

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The model number, B1123C, says that it is a 2110, not a 3000. The 2110 is the Low Center of Gravity (LCG) model within the 2000 series.

B1123C
B11 - 2110 LCG model
2 - gasoline engine
3 - live PTO
C - 8 speed transmission

The unit number, OH21B, says it was made on August 21 1970 during the day shift.

G is not a valid letter for the beginning of the serial number., It would have been an A, B or C, and it looks like a C to me, and C281675 is a 1970 serial number for a tractor made at the plant in the US.

Now those numbers are stamped into the transmission bell housing, so they really only apply to the tractor that the transmission was part of when it left the factory. So if the transmission ever failed and was swapped out then yours might be a 3000 that had a transmission from a 2110 swapped in, but we can't tell for sure without more information. On the right side of the engine block, down low, just above the oil pan, there is a smooth rail that runs from the front to the back, and in the middle of its length it gets taller. In that taller area of that flat rail there should be some smaller numbers stamped there. Those are the engine serial number, which would loook similar to the tractor serial number, being a letter followed by a 6 digit number. If that letter at the beginning is a B then the engine was built for a 2000 series tractor and if it is a C it was built for a 3000 series tractor. So a B would indicate that it is probably a 2110 that someone put 3000 decals on at some point and a C would mean that it was probably a 3000 originally and it had a transmission from a 2110 swapped in at some point.

In any case, the power steering pumps were the same between the 2000 and 3000 series tractors, so the answer to your questions about the power steering pump are the same for either. The number on the tag on the outside of your pump are not not the part number in terms of what part you need to order from a dealer. If that pump is original to the tractor then that number is the part number that the factory used to track the parts internally on the assembly line. The assembly line part numbers were usually different than the dealer parts department part numbers so they could track them separately for inventory and tax purposes. A manufacturer doesn't treat the parts for something they are building the same as individual parts that would be sold to consumers so they need to be tracked differently by the accountants.

Yes, E6NN3K514DA is the current official New Holland part number for the pump that you need. If you buy it using that part number from a New Holland dealer you should get the correct one, but it will be fairly expensive.

There are many third party companies making and selling replacement pumps that look the same and will fit and work on your tractor, but most of them will claim to be replacements for multiple pump part numbers and to work for a large range of tractor models and the vast majority of them have the relief valve set at 1100 psi, which is too high for your tractor. The power steering components (cylinders and control valve) for the 2000 and 3000 series were designed to be used with a pump that had its relief valve set to 650 psi. Ford used that same pump design on most of their tractors from 1968 through the mid 1990's and starting around 1981 to 1983 all tractors used the 1100 psi pump, and prior to that only the 2xx and 3xxx series used the 650 psi pump, and the 4xxx and some of the 5xxx series used an 850 psi pump for some of the years, and the only difference between all of them was the pressure relief valve setting, which can actually be changed by removing or adding shims inside the relief valve itself.

So an 1100 psi pump will mount to your tractor and probably work for a while because under normal operation the system never gets above its intended pressure rating, but every time that the steering is turned to the full stop left or right position the relief valve won't open up when the pressure reaches 650 psi as the correct pump would, instead it will climb to 1100 psi, so in the long run the seals inside the cylinders and control valve in the steering column will fail prematurely. If any of those seals are old and getting ready to fail they will do so in short order if you install an 1100 psi pump.

So make sure that the pump that you buy is a true 650 psi pump. They are hard to find these days and generally cost a bit more than the readily available 1100 psi pumps. Or if you have the ability and feel up to it you can pay the lower price for an 1100 psi pump and remove some shims to drop the relief pressure to 650 psi. You would need to create a test setup on your bench with an electric motor to spin the pump, a line connecting the pressure and return ports together with a fitting for a pressure gauge in it and a valve to restrict the flow so that the pressure builds to the point that the relief valve opens, and then disassemble and reeassemble the pump a few times removing or adding shims to get the relief setting correct. Removing shims lowers the relief pressure and adding them increases it.
 

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The model number, B1123C, says that it is a 2110, not a 3000. The 2110 is the Low Center of Gravity (LCG) model within the 2000 series.

B1123C
B11 - 2110 LCG model
2 - gasoline engine
3 - live PTO
C - 8 speed transmission

The unit number, OH21B, says it was made on August 21 1970 during the day shift.

G is not a valid letter for the beginning of the serial number., It would have been an A, B or C, and it looks like a C to me, and C281675 is a 1970 serial number for a tractor made at the plant in the US.

Now those numbers are stamped into the transmission bell housing, so they really only apply to the tractor that the transmission was part of when it left the factory. So if the transmission ever failed and was swapped out then yours might be a 3000 that had a transmission from a 2110 swapped in, but we can't tell for sure without more information. On the right side of the engine block, down low, just above the oil pan, there is a smooth rail that runs from the front to the back, and in the middle of its length it gets taller. In that taller area of that flat rail there should be some smaller numbers stamped there. Those are the engine serial number, which would loook similar to the tractor serial number, being a letter followed by a 6 digit number. If that letter at the beginning is a B then the engine was built for a 2000 series tractor and if it is a C it was built for a 3000 series tractor. So a B would indicate that it is probably a 2110 that someone put 3000 decals on at some point and a C would mean that it was probably a 3000 originally and it had a transmission from a 2110 swapped in at some point.

In any case, the power steering pumps were the same between the 2000 and 3000 series tractors, so the answer to your questions about the power steering pump are the same for either. The number on the tag on the outside of your pump are not not the part number in terms of what part you need to order from a dealer. If that pump is original to the tractor then that number is the part number that the factory used to track the parts internally on the assembly line. The assembly line part numbers were usually different than the dealer parts department part numbers so they could track them separately for inventory and tax purposes. A manufacturer doesn't treat the parts for something they are building the same as individual parts that would be sold to consumers so they need to be tracked differently by the accountants.

Yes, E6NN3K514DA is the current official New Holland part number for the pump that you need. If you buy it using that part number from a New Holland dealer you should get the correct one, but it will be fairly expensive.

There are many third party companies making and selling replacement pumps that look the same and will fit and work on your tractor, but most of them will claim to be replacements for multiple pump part numbers and to work for a large range of tractor models and the vast majority of them have the relief valve set at 1100 psi, which is too high for your tractor. The power steering components (cylinders and control valve) for the 2000 and 3000 series were designed to be used with a pump that had its relief valve set to 650 psi. Ford used that same pump design on most of their tractors from 1968 through the mid 1990's and starting around 1981 to 1983 all tractors used the 1100 psi pump, and prior to that only the 2xx and 3xxx series used the 650 psi pump, and the 4xxx and some of the 5xxx series used an 850 psi pump for some of the years, and the only difference between all of them was the pressure relief valve setting, which can actually be changed by removing or adding shims inside the relief valve itself.

So an 1100 psi pump will mount to your tractor and probably work for a while because under normal operation the system never gets above its intended pressure rating, but every time that the steering is turned to the full stop left or right position the relief valve won't open up when the pressure reaches 650 psi as the correct pump would, instead it will climb to 1100 psi, so in the long run the seals inside the cylinders and control valve in the steering column will fail prematurely. If any of those seals are old and getting ready to fail they will do so in short order if you install an 1100 psi pump.

So make sure that the pump that you buy is a true 650 psi pump. They are hard to find these days and generally cost a bit more than the readily available 1100 psi pumps. Or if you have the ability and feel up to it you can pay the lower price for an 1100 psi pump and remove some shims to drop the relief pressure to 650 psi. You would need to create a test setup on your bench with an electric motor to spin the pump, a line connecting the pressure and return ports together with a fitting for a pressure gauge in it and a valve to restrict the flow so that the pressure builds to the point that the relief valve opens, and then disassemble and reeassemble the pump a few times removing or adding shims to get the relief setting correct. Removing shims lowers the relief pressure and adding them increases it.
Impressive.
 

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The model number, B1123C, says that it is a 2110, not a 3000. The 2110 is the Low Center of Gravity (LCG) model within the 2000 series.

B1123C
B11 - 2110 LCG model
2 - gasoline engine
3 - live PTO
C - 8 speed transmission

The unit number, OH21B, says it was made on August 21 1970 during the day shift.

G is not a valid letter for the beginning of the serial number., It would have been an A, B or C, and it looks like a C to me, and C281675 is a 1970 serial number for a tractor made at the plant in the US.

Now those numbers are stamped into the transmission bell housing, so they really only apply to the tractor that the transmission was part of when it left the factory. So if the transmission ever failed and was swapped out then yours might be a 3000 that had a transmission from a 2110 swapped in, but we can't tell for sure without more information. On the right side of the engine block, down low, just above the oil pan, there is a smooth rail that runs from the front to the back, and in the middle of its length it gets taller. In that taller area of that flat rail there should be some smaller numbers stamped there. Those are the engine serial number, which would loook similar to the tractor serial number, being a letter followed by a 6 digit number. If that letter at the beginning is a B then the engine was built for a 2000 series tractor and if it is a C it was built for a 3000 series tractor. So a B would indicate that it is probably a 2110 that someone put 3000 decals on at some point and a C would mean that it was probably a 3000 originally and it had a transmission from a 2110 swapped in at some point.

In any case, the power steering pumps were the same between the 2000 and 3000 series tractors, so the answer to your questions about the power steering pump are the same for either. The number on the tag on the outside of your pump are not not the part number in terms of what part you need to order from a dealer. If that pump is original to the tractor then that number is the part number that the factory used to track the parts internally on the assembly line. The assembly line part numbers were usually different than the dealer parts department part numbers so they could track them separately for inventory and tax purposes. A manufacturer doesn't treat the parts for something they are building the same as individual parts that would be sold to consumers so they need to be tracked differently by the accountants.

Yes, E6NN3K514DA is the current official New Holland part number for the pump that you need. If you buy it using that part number from a New Holland dealer you should get the correct one, but it will be fairly expensive.

There are many third party companies making and selling replacement pumps that look the same and will fit and work on your tractor, but most of them will claim to be replacements for multiple pump part numbers and to work for a large range of tractor models and the vast majority of them have the relief valve set at 1100 psi, which is too high for your tractor. The power steering components (cylinders and control valve) for the 2000 and 3000 series were designed to be used with a pump that had its relief valve set to 650 psi. Ford used that same pump design on most of their tractors from 1968 through the mid 1990's and starting around 1981 to 1983 all tractors used the 1100 psi pump, and prior to that only the 2xx and 3xxx series used the 650 psi pump, and the 4xxx and some of the 5xxx series used an 850 psi pump for some of the years, and the only difference between all of them was the pressure relief valve setting, which can actually be changed by removing or adding shims inside the relief valve itself.

So an 1100 psi pump will mount to your tractor and probably work for a while because under normal operation the system never gets above its intended pressure rating, but every time that the steering is turned to the full stop left or right position the relief valve won't open up when the pressure reaches 650 psi as the correct pump would, instead it will climb to 1100 psi, so in the long run the seals inside the cylinders and control valve in the steering column will fail prematurely. If any of those seals are old and getting ready to fail they will do so in short order if you install an 1100 psi pump.

So make sure that the pump that you buy is a true 650 psi pump. They are hard to find these days and generally cost a bit more than the readily available 1100 psi pumps. Or if you have the ability and feel up to it you can pay the lower price for an 1100 psi pump and remove some shims to drop the relief pressure to 650 psi. You would need to create a test setup on your bench with an electric motor to spin the pump, a line connecting the pressure and return ports together with a fitting for a pressure gauge in it and a valve to restrict the flow so that the pressure builds to the point that the relief valve opens, and then disassemble and reassemble the pump a few times removing or adding shims to get the relief setting correct. Removing shims lowers the relief pressure and adding them increases it.

Thank you for that thorough reply!

oh course i already ordered the 1100psi and will return it when it comes... I called the company selling them and he couldn't find the 650psi replacement. I asked about rebuild kits or whatnot and couldn't help.

I found the serial number on the engine "i think" it is: C229667
2459514


So that means I have a 1970 Ford 3000 with a 2110 transmission? (just for my own reference)

I guess my question(s) now is:
Do they sell a rebuild/seal/"fix it" kit for this pump and woud you happen to know the part number (because there are so many different variables going on)?

I'm very apprehensive to pull that bumblegum looking stuff off the leak, is there something or a kit to fix this leak? Stinks I can't see if it's a seal/crack/whathaveya going on in there and i'm worried i'll make it worse if i pull it off without at least knowing how to maybe fix that part first.. I wanna peal it off....buuuuuuut...

Thanks again for your response/help/your time. This seems like a great resource here!
 

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That kind of looks like silicon on there. Not the way to fix that pump, especially if there’s a crack. Maybe if it isn’t under pressure it might help temporarily.
oh I'm sure it was a quick fix and it is a rubbery substance. I can't remember if he said the entire pump needs replaced or if he couldn't stop the leak and the pump is still good (i'm waiting on a call back). The reservoir is full and it's a bugger to turn so i am assuming the pump is out... but i'm not sure and i've never tested one before so i'm looking into how to check it
 

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I think... I'm going to try and remove the shims from the new pump. this link here explains it a bit further but if there is a walk through of this, please don't hesitate to post it.


edit: ....would it be possible to just take the shims from the old pump and swap them into the new ones?
 

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Well you have a 3000 series engine, which means that the transmission was swapped out at some point with one from a 2110, but that's OK because the same transmissions were used in both series. As for it being a 1970 tractor, that only applies to the tractor that the transsmission was originally in. Remember, those numbers are stamped into the transmssion so that Unit Number came along with the transmission from the 1970 2110 donor tractor. Look on the under side of the right side hood panel, up above the battery when you open the hood. There may be a foil sticker there that has the original model number, unit number and serial number that will tell us when the rest of the tractor was made.

That fitting where the power steering pump is leaking is not included in a rebuild kit and it is not sold as a separate part as it is part of the reservoir cover itself.

As I said, you can find the 650 psi pumps out there but they are more expensive.

Just another observation, the fact that the blue paint is peeling and there is yellow paint under the blue, it is likely that tractor started its life out as a highway mower.
 

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Well you have a 3000 series engine, which means that the transmission was swapped out at some point with one from a 2110, but that's OK because the same transmissions were used in both series. As for it being a 1970 tractor, that only applies to the tractor that the transsmission was originally in. Remember, those numbers are stamped into the transmssion so that Unit Number came along with the transmission from the 1970 2110 donor tractor. Look on the under side of the right side hood panel, up above the battery when you open the hood. There may be a foil sticker there that has the original model number, unit number and serial number that will tell us when the rest of the tractor was made.

That fitting where the power steering pump is leaking is not included in a rebuild kit and it is not sold as a separate part as it is part of the reservoir cover itself.

As I said, you can find the 650 psi pumps out there but they are more expensive.

Just another observation, the fact that the blue paint is peeling and there is yellow paint under the blue, it is likely that tractor started its life out as a highway mower.
I think I found it and they sure are expensive..

Hah! this is my first tractor and I knew it would need some work so here i am, "doing some work". That foil sticker seems long gone (on the right hand side, i have not undone the bolts and muffler to get to the other side yet).

It is yellow under there and that's what I sort of figured too..

The 1100psi pump will be here tuesday and i'd really like to try to change out the shims to make it 650psi... it probably wouldn't be as straight forward as taking the shims from the old pump and putting them into the new one would it? (golly that would be great....)

like i said, it's my first so i've grabbed the manuals, researching, and learning, it's good stuff. it runs well! it's just this and a couple lights out (for now).

thanks again for your help!
 
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